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Eight months gone and the ninth month of the year is beginning, a time for looking forward to cooler temperatures and the annual re-coloring of the foliage around us before it quits the branches and blankets the ground. Some teas and herbals to help you more fully appreciate this time of things falling:

5 September Teas to Fall For! (ETS image composite by A.C. Cargill)

5 September Teas to Fall For! (ETS image composite by A.C. Cargill)

 

1 Dessert in a Cup: Scottish Caramel Toffee Pu-erh Tea – Loose Leaf*

Pu-erh teas are in a class by themselves. They are what’s called “fermented” teas. The leaves are processed like a black tea (in this case) and then stored awhile. It gives them a somewhat unique flavor profile that many describe as “earthy.” This version adds in sweet caramel and toffee to combine with that earthy quality for a flavor that is sweet, burnt, and sugary – dessert in a teacup. This flavored tea also includes almond pieces, so if you have a nut sensitivity, this might be an issue.

2 Vibrant: PG Tips Vibrant Mandarin Orange Green Tea*

Part of that new line-up of teas from an iconic British brand. A top brand of tea in the UK, PG Tips is a Unilever brand. Their original special blend has been pleasing palates for over 75 years. In late February 2014 they added some updated blends and flavored teas to their line-up. This one is a natural blend of fine quality green teas from Kenya and Indonesia, this PG Tips green tea is bursting with vibrant mandarin orange flavor.

3 Crisp like Autumn Air: Apple Spice Flavored Black Tea*

Ceylon high-grown (5,500 feet elevation) black tea combines with apple pieces, cinnamon, blackberry leaves, safflower petals, and other natural flavors. The vapor-proof triple-layer bag seals in the aromas and flavors, so this tea arrives at your door with the freshness it had when it was sealed in that bag. This is one of my favorite Autumn flavor combos.

4 A Favorite Fall Flavor: Twinings Pumpkin Spice Chai*

Pumpkin time is here again! This spiced Chai (the Hindi word for “tea”) will fill your senses with that wonder pumpkin essence. In addition, you will get the perfect balance of flavors of cinnamon, cloves, ginger, nutmeg and allspice. Steep in water heated to a full boil for 5 minutes. You might want to add a touch of sugar. I like it with milk and sweetener.

5 Basic Black: Taylors of Harrogate – Pure Assam Tea Bags*

Some sources say this tea is grown from Chinese seeds, but that is not quite accurate. The Camellia sinensis assamica was already being cultivated and used to steep up a strong beverage when Robert Fortune was able to sneak plants and seeds out of China. The Brahmaputra River flows out of China into the state of Assam in Northern India and is partially responsible for the abundant crop and hearty flavor of this style of tea. While some tea growers have begun processing the leaves into orthodox black teas, green teas, and even white teas, the bulk produced is still CTC Assam, which is the basis for this tea. Malty, brisk, and full-bodied, this tea will be a real eye-opener in the morning. I enjoy it with milk and sweetener.

Hope you get to try some of these during September and get ready for the joys of harvest!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Here’s a quick quiz. It’s all of one question, so don’t be intimidated. What the best shape for a teabag? To the best of my knowledge – and not taking into consideration novelty type items – the most popular choices would be the standard rectangular teabag, the somewhat more modern round teabag, and the positively newfangled pyramid-shaped teabag.

PG Tips pyramid teabags (from the PG Tips official site)

PG Tips pyramid teabags (from the PG Tips official site)

If you keep in mind that one of the most important factors about your steeping teabag/gadget of choice is that it allows room for the water to circulate freely among the tea leaves, then that might give you a clue as to what the correct answer might be. My own vote would go to the pyramid teabag for the fact that it does seem to allow the water more room to circulate.

Which is apparently the correct answer, at least if we’re to believe a British group known as the Advertising Standards Authority, who describe themselves as “the UK’s independent regulator for advertising across all media.” They recently weighed in on a spat between two very well-known British tea companies and offered the opinion that the pyramid teabag tops round teabags.

The trouble started when one of the firms ran a TV commercial that touted the merits of their pyramid bags. The other company complained to the ASA, claiming that the commercial disparaged the company’s brand, as well as their round teabags.

In such a case, as the ASA notes, “The rules are also very clear about comparative claims. They are allowed but they must, of course, be truthful and fair as well as ensuring they avoid denigrating a competitor’s product or brand.” They ruled that company A proved their claims – and provided test results, to boot – regarding pyramid teabags and that they didn’t badmouth company B.

Which isn’t exactly definite proof that pyramid teabags are superior to the round ones (and by extension, the standard issue rectangular teabags) but’s it’s interesting to note nonetheless.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

I used to wonder what it meant to “call on” someone and why there were front parlors and back parlors in old Victorian era houses. Then I watched the BBC series Cranford and light dawned. And tea played a part in the solution to the mystery, as you will soon see.

(via Pinterest, Yahoo! Images, and BBC site)

(via Pinterest, Yahoo! Images, and BBC site)

About Cranford

Elizabeth Gaskell had three novellas published from 1849 to 1858 about the fictional village of Cranford in England. The BBC One TV channel in England broadcast the series based on these novellas in November and December 2007. In May 2008 they were shown in the U.S. There was also a two-part Christmas special aired in 2009. What was the appeal? A glimpse into a time in the history of England that had charm and lots of human drama without a lot of gore, swearing, and high-speed car chases. It also didn’t have loud, wild music and lots of split-second cuts so you could barely follow what was going on.

And a lot was going on, mainly among the town’s single and widowed middle class female inhabitants; they were comfortable with their traditional way of life while placing great store in being proper and portraying an appearance of gentility. Part of that appearance was the receiving of “callers” (visitors) for tea in the front parlor (a word derived from the French word parler which means “to speak”). To make things run smoothly, they would take turns during the week being the receiver of these callers, and on the other days they would be the callers.

Another is keeping up appearances even when your finances take a downward turn. Miss Matty, a spinster in the village, suffers a financial loss, but her friends secretly help her with money (that they say is due to a bank error) that she then uses to turn her front parlor from a place to enjoy tea into a place to sell tea – she goes into trade, as the expression of the day went.

Scenes from the series (see image at right):

  1. Several ladies of Cranford keeping watch to see who would be calling on them for tea. Or are they just hoping to catch something juicy to gossip about over their cuppas?
  2. Miss Matty in her front parlor that gets turned into a tea shop.
  3. A tea party typical of the era and definitely not one that you can whip together without considerable advance notice.

The Front Parlor

In the days before TV and video games people used to visit each other in their homes. Certain rules got established over time. One such rule was to confine one’s visit to the special “caller” room, call the front parlor. It was usually kept in peak condition and well-dusted. There would be various knickknacks around. Behavior was strictly proper and congenial. And tea was served, rolled in on a trolley. All of this comes through in the Cranford series and clears up a lot of mystery for us modern day folks.

Modern Day Parlors

These days we have open floorplans and very casual attitudes. We still try to keep things congenial and mind our manners, but it won’t cause a village-wide scandal if we fall short on either account. At least, I hope not!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

(From Yahoo! Images)

(From Yahoo! Images)

Tea time can get reflective, with memories of days gone by flooding into your consciousness. Thus it was the other day that, while sipping my mid-afternoon cuppa Darjeeling (or was it an oolong?), that the memory of the oscillating fan came to the forefront and imposed itself over all the other things circling around in my brain (from grocery lists to my plans for upcoming tea tastings). Oscillating fans are still quite popular, but there was a time when their importance during those sultry days of Summer was beyond price. Let me explain…

I remember the days of my youth before we had air conditioning. The oscillating fan blew on me – ah! Turned away – agony! It was set in a wide-open window in the bedroom in a vain attempt to give some relief so I could sleep. Heat is bad enough, but coupled with high humidity makes it like lying in a pool of hot water. Even those who are raised in Equatorial or Monsoonal regions never really acclimate. The worst is when the temperature in the evening after the sun goes down stays up relatively high. A drop from 99° to 85° Fahrenheit hardly matters when humidity is 70-80-90%. And neither do oscillating fans. But every time it turned my way I gave a sigh of momentary relief.

I wanted to stop the oscillation and have the fan blowing on me all the time, but it was supposed to be better for air movement with the breeze going around the room. Maybe so, but one thing was for sure … it was even better with a glass full of ice and tea in hand. In the daytime, I would either be outside under a shady tree with that cold tea or inside in front of that oscillating fan. Fortunately, there was only a limited portion of the year when such weather was in force. But I don’t know how I would have survived with the fan and the tea.

These days I drink hot tea year round (and others do the opposite – drinking iced tea year round). And we have air conditioning. But the memories linger. It makes my gratitude for technology all the greater.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

 © Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Nothing seems to drum up headlines like ridiculously expensive tea. Okay, there are plenty of other things that drum up headlines, like problems in the Middle East and celebrities behaving badly. But pricey tea is still good for a headline or two.

Like one from a British newspaper not so long ago. And I quote: Would you pay £180 for a pot of TEA? World’s most expensive brew goes on sale. I’d be more excited about all of this but, as the title of my own article suggests, this sort of thing is hardly unusual. I’ve written on this topic before – here’s a recent example – but I’m always open to taking another look.

The pot of tea in question will set you back the equivalent of just over $300 and can be had at the “prestigious Royal China Club on London’s affluent Baker Street.” The tea in this case is said to be a “Da Honh Pao (Imperial Red Robe)” whose leaves have supposedly been aged for 80 years. The result, “an aromatic infusion with distinctive dark cocoa notes, a toasted fruity flavour and a long smooth aftertaste that lingers for several minutes after consumed.” Which sounds enticing enough.

So, let’s allow that a teapot contains four cups, on average. If you wanted to go in with four of your pals and spring for a pot of this elixir you could each get a cup of it for about 75 dollars. Which is nothing to sneeze at and, while I’m certainly an avid cheerleader for drinking the best tea that you can, I can’t help but wonder if there’s any tea in existence that’s worth that much. But I’ll extend the same offer I have before when writing about such pricey tea. If anyone would like to pass along a sample, I’ll be glad to give it a try.

If you’re not up for paying 75 big ones for a cup of tea, take heart. If you’re ever at the Royal China Club and you’re a little bit short you can get a much more reasonable serving of tea for two for a mere eight dollars.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Tea and a big sneeze is a bad combo. But it happens. You feel it coming on. You try to hold it in. For awhile it seems as if you will succeed and have time to swallow that big mouthful of tea you just swigged from the teacup. Then, just when you are mentally giving a sigh of relief and about to swallow that tea, the sneeze bursts forth…along with that mouthful of tea. Murphy’s law at work here.

(From Yahoo! Images)

(From Yahoo! Images)

Well, the other day, without warning or any opportunity to try to hold it back, the big sneeze totally wasted a mouthful of superb English Breakfast No. 1 (with some milk and sweetener, of course). But just as you shouldn’t cry over spilt milk, crying over sneezed tea is equally futile. Thankfully, it wasn’t the last drop of tea in the house, or I must confess that an air of panic would have gripped me quite strongly at that moment. As it was, the biggest issue was clean-up. The next issue was getting the tea that went up my nose back out again (trying to be delicate here). It takes awhile. And a lot of facial tissues.

Tea is said to have a lot of health benefits (some backed up by real scientific studies and others…well…). Their effect on your nasal membranes can be less than beneficial, however. And things added into the tea, such as flower petals, fruits, lemon juice, sugar, and honey, will have their own effects, good or bad. Tea with milk in it is better, though, and can lessen the effects somewhat. That’s been my experience, at least, but definitely is not scientific. In fact, I searched and searched and cannot find a study done on people sneezing while drinking tea and having some or all of it go up their nose. Maybe some bright doctoral student will take this on as his/her thesis. Or not.

My personal tips:

  • Blow your nose well until you get out as much tea as you can.
  • Use a mild nasal spray, preferably one that is just a saline solution, spray up both sides of the nose per manufacturer’s directions.
  • Take smaller gulps of tea.
  • Avoid black pepper and other sneeze-inducing substances when drinking tea.
  • Keep plenty of extra tea on hand so wasting a little won’t be too disastrous.

These days, we tend not to carry cloth handkerchiefs, but you might consider it. Not those delicate and virtually useless lace ones. Have handy those nice white cotton cloth square ones. You may have to grab it at a moment’s notice to save your tea time guests from an unexpected incident.

Above all, don’t worry about it and enjoy your tea!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

My theory: there are 3 types of tea drinkers (for pleasure, for some health benefit, to save the world/become one with the universe). You may think of some more, but I think this pretty much covers the spectrum. Most tea drinkers are a blend of one or more of these types, at least so far I have not met any purists (all one type or the other). Time to elaborate.

Flowers and a cuppa for that pleasurable tea time. (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Flowers and a cuppa for that pleasurable tea time. (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

1 The Pleasure Tea Drinker

Many of us truly love the flavor of tea in all its variations, with our without anything added, hot or iced. Starting the day without that morning cuppa, be it English Breakfast, Tie Guan Yin, or even Matcha, would be incomprehensible. The sheer joy of the aromas and flavors make that day start out right. And then there is that Elevenses tea time and Afternoon Tea – moments that the pleasure drinker looks forward to for its sensory delights.

2 The Tea Drinker Seeking Health Benefits

Tea has a long list of health benefits associated with it. Many are supported by actual controlled studies while others come from centuries of anecdotal evidence. People, hopefully with the approval of their doctors, imbibe various styles of teas to take advantage of those benefits, which range from healthy skin and hair to preventing cancer (sadly, a recent study has shown that tea doesn’t cure cancer once it has begun). Along the way, many become tea aficionados and expand their range of sipping pleasure.

3 The Tea Drinker Seeking a Higher Purpose

This type of tea drinker pays close attention to every tidbit of tea news that comes along, not always substantiating it, though, and can base their tea drinking choices on that information. On the plus side, this can send a message to those tea growers and companies that mistreatment of workers or bad agricultural practices will not be tolerated. On the minus side, it becomes easy for false and purposely misleading information to be posted and thus become a tool for strong-arming a company into caving to demands that may not be good for all involved. As long as you know that the information is reliable, you’re fine.

Bottom Line

No matter which of the above you are (and most of you will be a combination of two or more of the above), I wish you happy tea drinking.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Steeping teabags in the teapot just like grandpa did. (Stock image)

Steeping teabags in the teapot just like grandpa did. (Stock image)

The way we enjoy tea has changed over the generations. Many of us no longer make tea like our grandparents did. We’ve learned about the variety of teas out there and the variety of infusing methods. But sometimes looking back and giving those old, reliable methods a go can be good, too.

How Our Grandparents Made Tea

Grandparents alive today were most likely alive when the teabag first came into popular use (around 1944, just before the start of World War II). The most popular story of how teabags came about is that a tea vendor mailed out sample bags (made of silk) of its tea to prospective customers. They, in turn, dunked silk bag and all in hot water to steep the tea. It proved so handy and time-saving that soon most tea drunk in this country (and in some European countries) was bagged, not loose. Our grandparents would put several bags in their teapots and steep up the tea, then pull out and discard the bags. Sometimes, if they were in a hurry and not having guests over, they would just dunk that teabag into their mug of hot water until it was dark enough. Many still use teabags these days, although some of us (yours truly included) have foregone the teabag in favor of loose leaf teas. You could say that most folks stick with making tea like their grandparents made.

Other Grandpas of Tea

  • A store in Texas called “Grampa’s Tea” where their teas are micro-blended (that is, hand-blended in small batches) and have real dried fruit pieces, flowers, and herbs in some of them for extra flavor and fragrance.
  • A tea vendor with a tea called “Great Grandfather’s Tea.” It is from a single tea estate (Diyagama Estate in the Dimbula region of Sri Lanka) that has been growing and producing fine tea for over 120 years (thus the tea’s name). It is a BOP (Broken Orange Pekoe) black tea with a bold flavor that can stand up to milk or is even pleasant on its own. That flavor comes from the elevation (3,500 to 5,500 feet above sea level) and the monsoon rains plus cold, dry weather.
  • Numerous books and images of grandchildren having a “grandpa’s tea” with Grandpa. Again, tapping into those positive vibes the term generates in many of us.

The Meaningless Term “Grandpa Style Tea”

The term “grandpa style” was made up by a tea blogger and seems to have no real relation to how our grandparents (at least those here in the U.S.) had tea. Some think it refers to a style of infusing tea away from home where you toss some loose leaves into a clear glass and add hot water, or you can even do this using cold water (the infamous cold-brewing), and then there are those steeping glasses that have the filter on the lid. But in reality, it is just a meaningless term. The style of tea infusion the blogger described has no real term associated with it. The blogger is merely hijacking a word (“grandpa”) that evokes positive associations in many of us.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

englishteastore_2159_16335570Everyone has their opinion when it comes to the question of whether to add milk to tea – and that’s fine (there’s also the question of whether the tea is added first or the milk is added first, but that’s another story). I’m a member of the “no milk” camp, but plenty of people like it and that’s fine because we all like what we like.

But in my research on other tea-related issues I’ve found instances of others who were not quite so tolerant of the milk/tea combination. Most recently, in an 1897 article I wrote about that ranted about the evils of tea in general, the author of said piece said the “dilution of the infusion with milk” is folly, though without elaborating on why.

In Delicate Feasting, by Theodore Child, an 1890 book that’s more of a how-to volume than a proper cookbook, the author pulls no punches when it comes to the milk/tea question. He notes that the custom of adding cream or milk to tea originated “in ignorance or bad brewing.” He goes on to assert that if the tea is good the addition of milk spoils the taste and it also makes the milk harder to digest.

The following year a US consul to China tackled the topic in a government report on Chinese tea. Which is considerably livelier than one might expect for a report written by a bureaucrat. He advises not boiling tea, not allowing it to touch metal and refers to green tea as “an abomination and a fraud.” As for milk, he too advises that it “ruins the flavor of the tea, and the combination injures the stomach,” likening the compounds created by this combination to “pure leather.”

Another report with a touch of the bureaucratic about it, an 1898 edition of the Wisconsin Farmers’ Institutes Bulletin, recommends that teapots be earthen or granite but never tin and notes that for medicinal purposes green tea is preferred over black. However, it also points out that some people find tea objectionable for health reasons and that “the addition of milk to tea and coffee makes them more objectionable.”

I suspect that anyone who likes milk in their tea isn’t going to change their mind about their preferences as a result of all this. But from a historical perspective, it is an interesting side note.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

C Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Summer temperatures in much of the U.S. have been cooler than normal – and you won’t get any complaints, at least, not from us. But there is plenty of iced tea weather ahead. Those days when you really need to take in the fluids, with iced tea being the main one. Officially, Summer lasts until September 23rd (this year), but often, warm temperatures can prevail far into October and even November. (You folks living in those parts of the U.S. that have Summer all year round also get to enjoy that iced tea year round.)

To be on top of every moment of iced tea potential now through November, I have compiled this list of average high temperatures for August, September, October, and November of this year (2014). If you live in or near one of these cities, you can see at a glance how much iced tea weather lies ahead during those months.

Your guide to potential iced tea weather through November of this year.

Your guide to potential iced tea weather through November of this year.

Now that you know the iced tea potential for the next few months, gather up some great teas to have during this time. Might as well cram in every bit of potential tea-loving goodness you can. Life is short. So fill it with tea!

Some suggestions:

  • Wild Blueberry Black Tea – Packs a great deal of sweet, tangy flavor with an intoxicating aroma, delicious hot or iced, especially with a pinch of sweetener added. For the best brew, steep for 2-5 minutes in water that has been brought to a rolling boil. Ingredients: Black tea, Elderberry and Raisin pieces, Hibiscus petals, Natural flavors.
  • Blue Lady Flavored Black Tea – A uniquely sweet taste with passion fruit, grapefruit, orange, and grenadine flavors. The sweetness of the citrus mélange blends perfectly with the astringency of high grown Ceylon tea. For the best brew, steep for 2-5 minutes in water that has been brought to a rolling boil. Ingredients: Black tea, Papaya and Pineapple pieces, Calendula and Cornflower and Sunflower petals, and Natural flavors.
  • Lemon Black Tea – Combined with a refreshing medium black tea, the natural lemon flavor of this tea is great with a little sugar, and is absolutely stunning iced. For the best brew, steep for 2-5 minutes in water that has been brought to a rolling boil. Ingredients: Black tea, Pineapple and Lime pieces, Lemongrass leaves, Calendula and Sunflower petals, and Natural flavors.
  • Lemon Green Tea – A pleasant blend of tart lemon, with the sweetness of green tea (Pekoe Gunpowder, one of the stronger flavored green teas on the market, taking your taste buds on a journey of smoky depths with each sip). Also makes an excellent iced tea. Ingredients: Green tea, Lime pieces, Calendula and Sunflower petals, and Natural flavors.
  • Georgia Peach Rooibos Caffeine Free Herbal – A caffeine-free blend of peaches and Rooibos, packed with subtle nuances and a complex flavor profile. Ingredients: Rooibos, Blackberry leaves, Calendula petals, and Natural flavors.
  • Oasis Mango White Tea – An oasis of tropical mango flavor, delicate and round with light honey notes, deep hits of mango, and a lightly astringent finish. Ingredients: White tea, Natural flavors.

Do a little bit of your own blending, mixing together a bit of this flavor and bit of that flavor. Lots of time ahead to explore and enjoy!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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