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A mug is a mug is a mug…or is it? A stylish tea mug will usually have certain elements in its design. Here are a few to look for when selecting the perfect mugs for your special tea parties or even those solo tea moments.

(ETS images)

(ETS images)

Some examples:

  1. Beau Rose Bone China Can Mug – White bone china helps the beautiful Beau Rose pattern in soft pink and green really stand out. Note the little butterfly inside and the classic shape of the handle. Dishwasher safe. Holds about 10 ounces.
  2. Blue Butterfly Porcelain Mug with Strainer – Ideal for that solo tea moment – just you and a hot mug of tasty tea. This one is a charming addition to your tea time – with gold trim, a swirl border, and a lovely butterfly pattern on white porcelain. A key element here is the saucer that you can use to hold the white porcelain strainer. Dishwasher safe.
  3. Royal Albert Old Country Roses Mug – A classic pattern from the Royal Albert collection in a classic shape (a great element to keep in mind when shopping). The crisp, white, fine bone china and is decorated with the Old Country Roses’ signature motif of burgundy, pink and yellow roses, accented with lustrous gold banding. Note the easy-to-hold handle shape and slight pedestal at the bottom. Holds 9.6 ounces.
  4. Petite Fleur Mug – White porcelain, purple irises and butterflies, a pedestal base, and a unique handle design make this mug stylish indeed. Holds 14 ounces. Hand wash only.
  5. Summertime Rose Fine Bone China Mug – A classic body shape decorated in the beautiful Summertime Rose pattern. Brilliant white fine bone china makes the design of pink and red roses really pop. The classic handle has a small thumb notch at the apex for more steady holding. Dishwasher and microwave safe. Holds 7 ounces.

Body shape, handle design, and pattern on the exterior all combine to make your mug totally stylish. Fill it with your favorite tea and have a wonderful time.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Invasions can begin small and grow so gradually that, before you know it, you’re totally taken over. No, I’m not talking about people. I’m talking about teawares. They can take over your house without any warning, filling every nook and cranny. Here are some signs to watch for so you can at least manage the onslaught.

The display in our house that made folks ask when we’d set up shop! (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

The display in our house that made folks ask when we’d set up shop! (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Sign 1: Teawares fill the kitchen cupboards

Where regular dishwares and cookwares would normally be, that is, in the kitchen cupboards, resides various teapots, teacups, saucers, and dessert plates. Those other items are stacked on the counter or in boxes.

Sign 2: Teawares displace books on the shelves

The kitchen cupboards are all full up with teawares, so now you start displacing the books on the shelves and replace them with the additional teawares that just seem to magically appear in your abode. The books end up in stacks in the corners yet still handy to read while you enjoy your tea.

Sign 3: Teawares cover the dining table

The cupboards and bookshelves are full, so you start just stacking those teawares on the dining table. Who eats in a dining room much anymore anyway? Everyone wants that eat-in kitchen or that open floor plan so when guests are over the cook and/or host/hostess can be in on the action with them. So, stacking the dining table high with your teawares just makes sense and uses valuable space.

Sign 4: Guests ask when you set up your shop

You’re giving a party, the guests arrive, and one of the first things out of their mouths is, “When did you set up a teawares shop?” And then they start looking for the price tags. It could take you awhile to convince them that it’s really not a shop. Some will remain unconvinced and say to you as they leave at the end of the party, “Let me know when you have a sale.”

Sign 5: A 3.5 to 4.5 Earthquake makes a big clatter

An earthquake of 3.5 magnitude is known to shake things in your home or office but otherwise may not even be felt, and a 4.5 magnitude quake will definitely rattle things. [source] Your teaware-filled house will resound with the clinking of those teawares during that earthquake. Sort of a symphoTEA!

Sign 6: You never need to wash teacups

You have so many teacups around that you never need to wash them in order to have a clean one. It works at a Mad Hatter Tea Party, so why not at your house? Just have a cuppa, set that teacup aside, get a clean cup, and have another cuppa.

Sign 7: Ditto for teapots

Once the teapot is empty, simply set it aside and grab another full teapot to continue imbibing.

Sign 8: You don’t ask for borrowed teawares to be returned

A neighbor or friend asks to borrow a teapot and/or teacups and saucers. You say sure and never bother to ask for them to be returned. And when they try to return them, you run the other way.

Sign 9: Dusting/cleaning your teawares involves an Indie 500 style pit crew

The pit crews at the Indie 500 know their assigned jobs and perform them to the utmost to help the driver get out of that pit and back on the track in the shortest time possible. Imagine them, dust rags and dishcloths in hand, making short work of dusting and washing your teawares. Like those pit crew members who change the tires, refill the engine oil and other fluids, etc., your teawares dusting crew will each have its assigned area, some dusting the items on the bookshelves, others tackling the ones stacked on the dining table, and still others collecting the used teacups and teapots left sitting around and giving them a cleaning.

So, has your house been taken over? Ours sure has.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Teabag and useful but annoying string. (stock image)

Teabag and useful but annoying string. (stock image)

Let’s put aside for now the matter of whether tea bags are a good thing or not. Some would say they are, and others scorn them. But the fact is that there are plenty of tea drinkers who use them. Probably all of whom have experienced that nagging problem of the tea bag string that escapes from its designated spot outside the tea cup and ends up in the tea.

It’s a problem that has inspired a significant amount of innovation and gadgetry. As I noted in an article here last year, some of the gadgets devised to get around the problem included the Tea Bag Buddy and the Tie Tea Cup. The Washington Post even deemed the problem significant enough that they compiled a list of suggestions from their readers of how to get around it.

But wait. There’s more. Of course there’s more when it comes to those pesky tea bag strings. This Tea Bag Cup Lid patent was filed for in 2007. It resembles the Tea Bag Buddy mentioned above in that it somehow attaches the tea bag to the lid and, as the application says, “a resilient stopper (38) is disposed within the access opening in the lid, holding the tea bag string (36) between the stopper and the access opening, permitting the tea bag (22) to be initially immersed in hot water within the cup for brewing with the capability of retaining the tea bag string when the tea bag is manually drawn upward away from the tea after brewing. The invention allows brewed tea to be consumed through the lid body without of removing the tea bag until any time after drinking the brewed tea.”

Here’s a patent awarded a year earlier for an “an improved tea bag has a pouch containing tea and a string connected to the pouch. A securing element is connected to the string. The securing element is releaseably attachable to an object such as a tea cup or tea pot.” Or you could try a 2003 patent from Germany whose name describes exactly what it sets out to do – Elongated Handle With Slit for Holding String of Tea Bag Has V-Shaped End to Slit to Facilitate Insertion of String Into Slit

Here’s a rather intricate patent from 1967 for a Teabag Dipper that doesn’t seem to attack the string problem head on but solves it anyway. It’s described, in part, as “a teabag dipper in the form of a saucer for a teacup combined with a receptacle and provided with an arm to which is attached a teabag which, by rotation of a crank mounted upon the arm, can be transferred from a position whereby the teabag is dipped into the water in the teacup to a position whereby the teabag is dumped into the receptacle for disposal.”

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Drawstring Tea Filters (ETS image)

Drawstring Tea Filters (ETS image)

There are any number of alleged uses for a used tea bag, including various cleaning tasks, soothing your weary eyes, and fertilizing plants. Tea has also been used in various ways to make art, and the same goes for tea bags. But what about making your own tea bags? Well, I’d have to say this article is the first time I’ve ever run across such an unusual notion. Instructions are included, if you’d like to play along, and the end result is interesting. Although it seems like more effort than I’m willing to expend.

Did you know that boiled lambskin used to be used as armor for Icelandic warriors? Me neither. Not until I ran across this article that notes that nowadays it is being used for more mundane purposes such as sleeves for iPads and teapots. Great stuff – unless you’re the lamb.

I’ve written a number of articles about offbeat tea patents but think I might have overlooked the one that offered a “method of enhancing tea flavor and aroma,” one that makes use of various extracts from fruits such as apricots, bananas, apples, and more.

Tea at its most basic – leaves, hot water, and something to steep it in – seems like a formula that can’t be improved on much but that doesn’t stop people from trying. There’s the tea bag, for example, and more recently there are those single-serving tea pods that are alleged to be an improvement on the basic tea formula. Along the same lines is the Teadrop, which is said to be “a portable morsel comprised of finely sourced tea, natural sugar, and aromatic spices creating a blissful tea blend that can be enjoyed any time, any place, with just hot water.”

Finally, it’s become something of a tradition to mention an exceptional novelty tea infuser in each one of these monthly gadget reports. This time around we were going to present the Octeapus. Which is probably about what you’d expect, given the name. As the manufacturer’s description puts it, it’s a Tentacled Tea Infuser. Sadly, it’s already sold out.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

No matter what useful object there is out there, some artist can take it over and make it into something extraordinary. The teapot has been a key subject over the centuries for such makeovers. And taking it a step further to the sculpture stage seems to be quite the rage. I’ve certainly come across a fair number of these in my “travels” around the internet, especially sites that focuses on sharing pictures.

3 examples of teapots transcending to the sculpture category (from Pinterest)

3 examples of teapots transcending to the sculpture category (from Pinterest)

  1. Hull Ebb Tide Teapot Found on images.replacements.com
  2. A very sculptural teapot found on new.artbash.co.nz
  3. James Diem’s teapot sculpture from the 2013 Utah Arts Festival

When transcending a teapot from function to form, from steeper to statue, from kitchen necessity to décor frivolity, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, it needs to retain the essential elements of that teapot that is its heart and soul. That means there must be a handle, a spout, an interior cavity to hold liquid, an access to that interior, and of course a way to sit upright. Second, it must in some elevate the form above the function, emphasize the aesthetic over the practical, look so delightful, beautiful, or just plain unusual that you wouldn’t think of it first as a teapot but as a sculpture.

The line between objectified teapots and these teapot sculptures can be pretty ephemeral, shifting, and impossible to define in any very straightforward manner. It’s the sort of thing about which you say “I’ll know it when I see it.” Sadler is the example that comes quickly to mind here. They do teapots shaped like Big Ben, cottages, Henry VIII, and so on. The style, colors, and overall designs keeps these from making that transcendence to sculpture. But their usability and quality make them very collectible!

A final word on those teapot sculptures: if you see one you like and can afford it, go ahead and buy it. A tea lover can never have too much tea paraphernalia around.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

These days most of the teas in my pantry are not only loose leaf teas but come in a pouch, not a tea tin. You can squeeze excess air out of a pouch and keep your teas fresher longer (not that ours last that long around here for it to matter that much). However, tea tins are missed. Why? Because they can be reused for so many things once the tea has been steeped and enjoyed and the tea leaves used in the garden to enrich the soil.

A Few Typical Tea Tin Reuses

A favorite tea tin is the classic design from Twinings. It seems to show up just about everywhere, but a very typical use is as a planter for your window sill. The Harney & Sons tins (those very special looking ones) showed up as a wall organizer. Candle holders, storage of things like pushpins, pencil holders (especially good in the tall, round tea tins), flower vases (be sure the tin is water tight), and even jewelry storage are other typical ways these tins get reused.

A Few Typical Tea Tin Reuses: 1 – candleholders, 2 & 3 – planters, 4 – pen/pencil holders (From Yahoo! Images)

A Few Typical Tea Tin Reuses: 1 – candleholders, 2 & 3 – planters, 4 – pen/pencil holders (From Yahoo! Images)

A Few Very A-Typical Tea Tin Reuses

A ceiling light fixture where the lightshades are made of tea tins is one unusual use I’ve seen. Another is a tea tin refitted as a pin cushion. Another possibility: A windchime ensemble – poke holes in the botton of several tea tins of various sizes, put a string through the hole and knot one end to hold in it place, tie the other end around a stick. Still another possibility: As a cookie tin – bake some cookies just the right size to stack in one of those tall, round tins and then decorate the outside with your own label (for example, “Susie’s Cookies Baked Just for Your Birthday”).

A Few Very A-Typical Tea Tin Reuses: 1 – ceiling light fixture, 2 – pincushion (From Yahoo! Images)

A Few Very A-Typical Tea Tin Reuses: 1 – ceiling light fixture, 2 – pincushion (From Yahoo! Images)

Getting fancy with that tea tin redo. (Screen capture from site)

Getting fancy with that tea tin redo. (Screen capture from site)

Getting Fancy with Your Reused Tea Tin

Let your imagination be your guide. Go fancy with that reused tea tin. I found an example on this blog, but there are plenty more ideas out there. That tea tin can be a work of total splendor.

Time to dig that tea tin out of the trash and see what you can do with it!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

There you are pouring tea for your guests and yourself (the tea time “mother” always pours for herself last), and the teapot is dripping all over the place every time you tilt it back up after the pour. How awkward! What can you do about that drippy teapot spout? Well, I have several suggestions. But first, a bit about why teapots drip…yes, there is a reason other than just to annoy you.

1 - Yellow lemon, 2 - white paper (disposable), 3 - red hand-crocheted, and 4 - a combo drip catcher lid holder. (From Yahoo! Images)

1 – Yellow lemon, 2 – white paper (disposable), 3 – red hand-crocheted, and 4 – a combo drip catcher lid holder. (From Yahoo! Images)

Why Teapots Drip

For decades this very question has plagued the scientifically minded as well as the rest of us. Many physicists thought it had to do with the surface tension of water – the force that holds a drop of water together and that gets broken when you boil water, causing those air bubbles. Finally, though, a very plausible and reasonable answer has been put forward by a distinguished professor of engineering and mathematics: Dr. Joseph B. Keller. First, a fellow scientist showed that it was not surface tension causing those drips (easy to disprove a theory and much of scientific effort is spent on doing just that). Then, Dr. Keller showed in his paper, The Teapot Effect, that it was air pressure causing the drips. I know, probably more than you care to think about when serving tea. But it helps to know what causes a problem so you know how to solve it, bringing us to the following:

Solution #1: Use a Drip Catcher

The drip catcher comes in two basic styles: those that fit over the spout and those that hang from the spout with cords and a decorative element that fits over the teapot to also hold the lid on. Each has benefits and issues. Even the cutest ones can be odd looking on your gorgeous fine bone china teapot, and they can get so filled up that they start dripping, plus they get tea-stained over time.

Solution #2: Use a Small Cloth

The cloth will get tea-stained. Very. So use something close to the color of the tea you are serving. A nice reddish brown (raw or even burnt sienna) comes to mind here. It would even work for teas where the liquid is lighter. Just remember to wash it now and then, like you do for your oven mitts, potholders, aprons, napkins, tablecloths, etc.

Solution #3: Shop for a Non-dripping Teapot

The spout shape is the key. Some spouts are made for dripping and others aren’t. Back to Dr. Keller here, who claims he can look at a teapot spout and tell you if it’s a dripper or not. Two things to look for:

  1. A teapot spout that points up and then straight down at the pouring end – dripping is prevented because the tea will flow back into the pot when the pot is turned upright again
  2. Avoid the sharp spout like most metallic teapots have – that sharp edge assures a drip since the tea can’t flow back into the pot.

He further advises against overfilling the teapot, since the lower the volume of tea in the pot, the faster it will flow and the less likely it will cling to the spout tip.

One Final Note

I bought one of those metal springy things that you insert into the teapot spout to prevent drips. It worsened them. Just wanted to let you know.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The well of novelty tea infusers is so deep that it can surely never run dry. It’s become kind of a tradition in these gadget reports to comment on a notable one of these gizmos and this edition is no exception. But this time around we’ll feature not just one but two outstanding novelty tea infusers – all for our usual low price. First, for those who’d like to add a bit of a scientific feel to tea time, there’s this Lab Beaker Tea Infuser. Next up, you could probably almost guess what the Teatanic Unsinkable Tea Infuser is like, but if you need to confirm it look here.

One of the more unusual tea gizmos I’ve run across lately is a tea bag that’s emblazoned with a symbol that’s made of an ink that’s safe to ingest. Which is kind of nifty. But wait – there’s more. When the tea bag is steeped the symbol morphs into something else entirely. For example, as the tea is steeping, a hawk might change into a dove.

The singer Lady Gaga is probably one of the more high profile celebrities these days who is known to be a tea lover. When she passed through Minnesota recently a local tea merchant was given the task of creating a custom blend for her. The full details are not available, but apparently it contained a curious mix of Minnesota wild rice, juniper berries, saffron, and whole vanilla bean – and presumably some other ingredients. I’d have thought that someone with Lady Gaga’s means could afford to travel with her own tea sommelier but apparently she hasn’t gone to that extreme just yet.

I’ve never tried tea made with one of those single serving pod type machines, and I’m not really itching to. But our Esteemed Editor had a less than stellar experience with one not so long ago, which she discusses here. Whether or not you like tea prepared this way, you might find it interesting to know that one company is making a recyclable version of the pods that are used therein.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Drawstring Tea Filters (ETS Image)

Drawstring Tea Filters (ETS Image)

Like it or not, the tea bag is probably not going anywhere. Common wisdom suggests that it was invented just over a century ago and that it has undergone many changes since then. You can still get dubious tea in a standard issue tea bag, if you choose to do so. Or you can upgrade to high quality loose leaf tea in various “gourmet” tea bags that allow the leaves more room to steep.

Here are a few things you may or may not have known about tea bags:

Origin I
It’s often said that the tea bag was “invented” more or less by accident by a New York tea merchant named Thomas Sullivan who offered samples of his tea in silk bags. Which the recipients unwittingly steeped in hot water. It seemed more like myth than truth to me, and so I attempted to sort it out in an article I wrote here a few years ago.

Origin II
In The Century Cook Book, by Mary Ronald, the author suggests that when making a large quantity of tea “it is well to put the tea into a swiss muslin bag, using enough to make a very strong infusion.” Which sounds a lot like a tea bag, if you ask me. In the next paragraph the author goes on to describe silver balls that sound a lot like the tea infusers we use nowadays. Which is noteworthy since the book was published in 1895, about a decade before the tea bag was supposedly invented.

Origin III
Going back more than another decade, to 1883, an article in The Coffee Public-House News and Temperance Hotel Journal suggests using “a muslin or other bag” to make larger quantities of tea at one time. Which also sounds a lot like a tea bag.

Mess Prevention
One of the long standing problems with tea bags is that they tend to be messy. A lot of time and energy has gone into getting around this and I’ve written about a number of these gadgets. Here’s a rather intricate solution from 1959 that was known as a Self-Squeezing Tea or Coffee Bag.

Popularity
According to the Tea Association of the USA, as of 2012, over 65 percent of the tea brewed in the United States was prepared using tea bags. Which is a drop in the tea bucket next to the UK. There, as most accounts seem to agree, more than 90 percent of tea is made using tea bags.

Know When to Fold ‘Em
Last of all, let us make note of the fact that tea bag folding is a thing you can do. A thing that’s not completely unlike origami. Find out more at one of the many web sites devoted to this art.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Rose Teapot - 50oz (ETS Image)

Rose Teapot – 50oz (ETS Image)

There are kettles. There are teapots. And there are kettle teapots. Yep, I said “kettle teapots” … or even “teapot kettles” as some call them. They have been around about as long as humans have been drinking tea, but they tend not to be as in the public eye. Time to give them some exposure, starting with pointing out which is which.

Handle Placement

Generally (I have to qualify things here since you creative designers out there keep coming up with all kinds of new designs that blur the lines of distinction), kettles are have a handle that arcs across the top of the kettle’s body. Teapots, for the most part, have handles on the side. Some are directly opposite the spout and others are at a 90° angle. A side handle tends to be more graceful for pouring at table.

How They’re Used

A kettle teapot and a regular teapot. (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

A kettle teapot and a regular teapot. (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Top to bottom: Japanese Kettle Teapot, Red vintage Japanese tea kettle teapot from kitschCAFE, Antique Royal Worcester Pagoda Pattern Kettle Shaped Teapot C. 1880, large vintage copper teapot kettle (From Yahoo! Images)

Top to bottom: Japanese Kettle Teapot, Red vintage Japanese tea kettle teapot from kitschCAFE, Antique Royal Worcester Pagoda Pattern Kettle Shaped Teapot C. 1880, large vintage copper teapot kettle (From Yahoo! Images)

Generally (once again qualifying), kettles are used to heat water while teapots are used to infuse the tea leaves in the water that the kettles heat. As such, kettles tend to be made of heat-conducting materials that won’t be damaged by an open flame, the heating element of a stove or hot plate, or the heat generated by the plug in the wall. Teapots, as the vessels of infusion, need to be made of less heat-conducting material so the tea doesn’t cool before the leaves have a chance to steep. Some do this better than others. Silver teapots are recommended for black teas but tend to conduct heat so well that many have wooden handles so you don’t scorch your fingers. Special clay teapots from China called “Yixing” are much better at holding in that heat. Glass teapots are visually fascinating but again let the tea cool fast. But then I guess that’s why teapot cozies are so plentiful.

The Melding

Kettle teapots (or teapot kettles) meld together the two designs but not necessarily the two uses. Their handles are arced across the top but they are made of ceramic, porcelain, silver, and even glass. They are mainly about style, it seems, and not about function. They infuse the tea leaves but are a bit awkward to pour from in my estimation and certainly are not fit for sitting on an open flame – the exception is some cast iron teapots that are glazed inside so that they can be used to heat water and infuse the tea leaves. I have such a cast iron kettle teapot in my personal collection, and there are plenty of other examples out there.

Whatever style you go with, the kettle teapot will be a great addition to your bevy of teawares!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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