Keemun Panda (ETS image)

Keemun Panda (ETS image)

Sometimes a tea will surprise you. Not that this is necessarily a good thing. For me, at least, there have been good tea surprises and there have been bad ones. Obviously, I’d prefer the former but sometimes in this life we have to take the hand (or tea) we’re dealt.

I’ve learned to like Keemun over the years, a type of tea I didn’t care that much for at first. It’s a black tea from China that often has a hint of smokiness, something that I don’t normally like much in tea. But over time I’ve learned to like the more subtly smoky examples of this tea.

So I was mildly interested when a bunch of samples I was sent recently contained something that was described as a “superfine” Keemun. I was even more interested – in fact, quite intrigued – when I opened the package and was assaulted by the overwhelming aroma. And I mean that in a good way. I hastened to move this tea to the head of the stack of samples I’d been sent and steeped some right away.

And what a surprise it was. I wouldn’t say that it didn’t have any taste at all, but I’d venture to say that it came very close. I was less than impressed. I intend to give it another try just to make sure that I didn’t make a mistake while I was preparing it. But for now I’ll check this up to the “not very good surprise” category.

But there are also some good surprises when it comes to tea. As I’ve already suggested, one of my first steps in judging a tea is to simply open the package and evaluate the aroma of the dry leaves. There is generally a correlation between the smell of the leaves and the taste of the tea, except in such cases as noted above. The flip side of this are those rare good surprises when a bland smelling tea turns out to be a winner. It doesn’t happen often but that only serves to make it more surprising.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Apple Spice Naturally Flavored Black Tea (ETS image)

Apple Spice Naturally Flavored Black Tea (ETS image)

For some folks, Labor Day is officially the end of Summer, which among the folks in the Hamptons also means it’s the last day to wear white until Memorial Day, but officially Summer continues until around the end of the 3rd week of September. I always like to observe this official version of the change of seasons with a nice toast of the teacup. And that means steeping up some tea with great Fall flavors.

Autumnal Darjeeling Teas

Most teas come from leaves of the Camellia sinensis bush (lots of various cultivars, actually) and are harvested 3, 4, or even 5 times per growing season (flush). Each harvest has its own flavor characteristics. Many tea connoisseurs go ga-ga for first and second flush Darjeeling teas. These are the ones harvested during early to mid-spring and in June or July. But my faves are the autumnal teas, harvested during September-October. They are the final “hurrah!” of the growing season, and the plants put a lot of “oomph!” into them. They tend to steep up stronger tasting, enough so that their flavors endure in the cup even after you add a bit of milk and sweetener, which make the flavor even more naturally fruit-like with a hint of an Assam maltiness.

Apple and Cinnamon Flavored Teas

A fruit that is usually harvested around this time of year, the apple is seemingly made to go with tea. And an apple-flavored tea is better than apple pie or some other calorie-laden dish. Add a dash of cinnamon and this tea really brings out that Fall atmosphere.

A great example: Apple Spice Flavored Black Tea – A blend with a lively, fruity flavor of fresh orchard apples with delicious cinnamon notes. Uses natural high grown Ceylon tea from estates at more than 5,500 feet above sea level. Includes apple pieces, cinnamon, blackberry leaves, safflower petals, and natural flavors.

Pumpkin Flavored Teas

Another crop that is harvested about now is pumpkins. Items with pumpkin in them start popping up all over. Pies, cakes, breads, soups, candies, and teas, to name a few. A cuppa this style of tea is just right for enjoying cooler weather after the heat and humidity of Summer.

A great example: Pumpkin Spice Flavored Black Tea – A blend of black teas and South African Rooibos (redbush herbal) – absolutely perfect when served hot with milk and sugar. Includes black tea, Rooibos, apple, almond, orange, rosehip, and vanilla pieces, calendula and sunflower and hibiscus petals, cinnamon, nut oil, and natural flavors.

Robust Black Teas

Another aspect of a good Fall time cuppa is a more robust flavor, mainly because many of us like a tea this time of year that can take a bit of milk and sweetener. A few options are:

  • Yorkshire Red Label Tea – A blend of the very best of teas from India, Africa and Sri Lanka to create the unmistakable character of Yorkshire Tea. It has a strong aroma, rich color and satisfying flavor.
  • Irish Breakfast Tea – A stout robust blend of February Kenya BP1 and 2nd flush Assam. A superb color and very full-bodied tea.
  • Organic Assam TGFOP Tea – A flavorful tea with superb astringency and jammy profile. The expansive malt character opens with milk.
  • Taylor of Harrogates Scottish Breakfast Tea – A thick-tasting and strong cup of Assam tea with a rich malty character best served with milk and a bit of sweetener.
  • PG Tips – The Strong One – A blend of Kenyan and other African teas for a bold cuppa tea. A strong, ruby-colored liquid with a malty aroma and thick tea character. Great with milk and sweetener.
  • Sylvakandy Estate Orange Pekoe Tea – A malty flavor that smoothes with a floral character. Best enjoyed hot with a dash of milk to help open and expand its flavor profile.
  • Kambaa Estate Tea – A very malty flavor with light hints of currant.

Whichever tea you choose, it should be a great way to start Fall. Enjoy!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Tea Bag Squeezer (ETS image)

Tea Bag Squeezer (ETS image)

To dunk or not to dunk? To squeeze or not to squeeze?

I suspect that for many people who use a teabag to prepare tea it’s probably quite common to dunk the bag repeatedly and to squeeze it when you’re finished. There are even specially constructed tongs that are designed to assist with the latter action. But should you be inflicting all of this on your teabag? What exactly is the proper way to handle your teabag? Our very own esteemed editor tackled that topic a little while back and came down on the side of not squeezing, but I thought I’d look around to see if any research had been done on the topic.

Lo and behold. It turns out that there has been some research. With regard to the dunking question, here’s an article that recently appeared in the Irish press that weighed in on the matter, courtesy of a chap identified as a tea chemist. Read it all, if you’re so inclined, but here’s the conclusion, “I cannot find a difference between dunking and not dunking under controlled circumstances – so do it how you want.” Here’s a more detailed version of the same article that even includes some math that supposedly helps explain it all.

But what about squeezing? There’s no research cited, but some of the great names of British tea selling have weighed in on this very matter. At the Twinings web site they offer a primer called “How To Taste Tea” which suggests that squeezing your tea bag is not necessarily a bad thing, but “Its best not to overly squeeze your tea bag because this could release deep rooted tannins and they taste very bitter.”

At the web site for yet another British tea maker, Yorkshire Tea (part of Taylors of Harrogate), they offer some tips on how to make a proper brew and also suggest that squeezing in moderation is probably the best course of action, “Remove the teabag with a spoon giving it just one gentle squeeze.”

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The infusing of those magic leaves of the Camellia sinensis bush has been going on for a long time – over 5,000 years according to some historical records and archeological digs. They were not only capable of transforming water into a cup of flavorful aromatic liquid, but they brought folks together in a very social way. Long before social media sites like Twitter and long before there were hashtags, there were regular gatherings, tea ceremonies, and special occasions celebrated with tea. These very often took place in tea rooms. The original social media (as stated by the author of an inspiring article I saw online recently)!

The Tea Dance – very social! (From Yahoo! Images)

The Tea Dance – very social! (From Yahoo! Images)

An Historic Chinese Tea Room

The Heming Teahouse is part of the history and culture of China and remains a favorite with locals even now, serving only locally grown green teas that are made with hot water poured from special long-spouted copper pots. The Chinese game of mahjong, very popular also here in the U.S. these days, and open conversation (tea houses have always been one of the few places in China where people could speak freely, making them targets of shutdowns during times of unrest) are still ongoing in this teahouse that has been around well over a century. It has seen the fall of the Qing Dynasty in 1911, a Cultural Revolution, and rioting in 1989. Chats while sipping tea were and are often their only way of exchanging opinions on life around them. No Twitter. No Facebook. This teahouse and others remain unchanged as the world around them changes faster and faster. And that is another aspect of their continuing appeal.

Tea Rooms Take Over Europe

Tea came to The Netherlands and France in the 1600s and shortly thereafter to England. But tea rooms didn’t begin their take-over as a social venue until the late 1880s. Tea was still too expensive for casual consumption until the early 1800s and having tea at home was considered more normal. People would also take turns hosting afternoon tea for their neighbors who would come to call and partake in the front parlor, set up especially to receive guests (see my article here).

As tea prices came down, however, a change occurred. Hotels began setting up special tea rooms and offering tea service there, usually in the late afternoon. It was a way to build up business by offering a social venue for many single and even married women to gather in a public place in a respectable manner. Elegance was the byword. Good manners and polite conversation were expected. But a bit of gossip, sharing of domestic information (servant problems, recipes, issues with the male elements of their lives, etc.), and even daring to discuss politics, foreign relations, and other matters about which they were not supposed to “worry their pretty little heads” were also spoken of. Again, no Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, etc., for such exchanges. Just lots of “face time.” Add in some dancing as men began attending these tea functions (hey, they go wherever female companionship can be found), and the social aspect was complete.

These days tea rooms dominate Europe, with France being a top country for such gathering places. The U.S. picked up on the trend at places like The Ritz in Boston and The Plaza in New York back in the late 1880s to early 1900s, but today the country lags behind in tea room numbers. People are too busy tweeting and skyping to sit still long enough for a nice cuppa and a chat.

You can still toss aside that laptop, iPhone, computer tablet, etc., and go to a physical tea room to enjoy the real thing. Time to get social!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Getting the gold can sure be a thrill. (via Yahoo! Images)

Getting the gold can sure be a thrill. (via Yahoo! Images)

Awards are great…sometimes. And other times they serve other purposes. It’s true just about everywhere, including in the world of tea. So I present here a few personal thoughts on these tea awards and welcome yours.

Awards for tea are a sign that someone thinks that the time and effort invested in the award-winning tea was well-spent. However, there is no guarantees with that award that you will like the tea so honored. Some of the awards aren’t even related to the tea’s flavor. The ones for package design and marketing plans come to mind here. Setting those aside, though, I have to note that even the awards related to taste, such as best in category (black, green, flavored, etc.), are rather iffy. The judges are focused on certain aspects of the tea and also taste it differently than you do, slurping in a mouthful, swishing, and then spitting it out. I don’t know too many folks who do that at home or in a restaurant or tea room, but then I haven’t done any official surveys. Plus, no two sets of tastebuds are alike, and taste perceptions are influenced by several things, including your health and what flavors you grew up with. Just check out popular ice cream flavors in Asian countries as an example. Wasabi Ice Cream with Honey is one, and Chile, Ginger, and Lemongrass Ice Cream is another; they aren’t very appealing sounding to me, even though I love these flavors in other things (in fact, I’m craving some wasabi right now just writing about it here).

Another issue is that not all tea producers or vendors can afford to enter such competitions and attend the events at which the awards are presented. So the winners are folks who can afford these things. It shuts out smaller, and possibly superior, growers/processors. I have tasted teas from these shut-outs and compared them with some award winners. And since I don’t use the slurp/swish/spit method, my taste experience is going to be more like yours, even though our tastebuds are different. And I can tell you that the shut-outs are often unknown (and therefore undervalued) treasures.

So, why pay any attention to the whole tea award thing? For the same reason we seem to be riveted to beauty pageants, the Oscars, and the Grammys. We just like competitions. It is the struggle of one against another, pitting skills and achievements. And just as we may not be thrilled by the winner of Best Picture or the Rock Album of the Year, we may not be thrilled with that winner of best tea in category. It happens a lot. After all, as I said earlier, the judging of tea is done under special conditions using special methods by highly trained and experienced individuals. In other words, this is not like your life situation, your kitchen, your teawares, even your water. And don’t forget your own unique tastebuds.

That’s life. If you want to venture to try a tea because it won an award, here’s hoping the experience meets expectations. But don’t be surprised if it doesn’t. Enjoy the experience!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Ceylon Tea (ETS image)

Ceylon Tea (ETS image)

Once upon a time the country off the southeastern coast of India that we now know as Sri Lanka had another name. It was called Ceylon and though the name would eventually change the tea that is grown there still bears the old one. Ceylon tea is a relatively new development, coming to the island only about a century and a half ago after the coffee crops there were severely damaged by disease.

It was in 1907, just a few decades after tea growing got underway there, that a publication called The Tropical Agriculturist and Magazine of the Ceylon Agricultural Society featured an article called “The Leading Teas of the World – Ceylon.” It was written by a gentleman identified as “the late Herbert Compton” and it’s perhaps just a bit on the dry side, with plenty of facts and figures, but it’s interesting nonetheless.

Compton opens with a reference to the island’s “nine (commercial) lives,” which also included such commodities as spices, pepper, and cocoa, but stresses that tea “still holds current pride of place as the staple crop of the Colony.” He summarizes the fall of coffee and the rise of tea and notes that about 160 million pounds of the latter was being produced annually at the time.

The majority of this ended up in the United Kingdom, not surprisingly, but substantial quantities ended up in Australasia, North America, and Russia. Next up is a description of Ceylon teas, which he likens to “a blend of Indian and China leaf,” and remarks that it is “silky and smooth to the palate.” From there it’s on to intricacies of pricing and whatnot that are more geared to professional tea buyers followed by a summary of some of the notable tea growing regions there.

Compton closes things by noting that Ceylon growers were beginning to turn their efforts from producing mostly black teas and including more green tea, the latter of which was designed to appeal to the American markets.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Lifeguards at Bethany Beach Delaware (via Yahoo! Images)

Lifeguards at Bethany Beach Delaware (via Yahoo! Images)

Some parts of the U.S. have seen snow. And unseasonably cold temperatures. (There was also an early snowfall in northern India around the beginning of September.) And too much rain. And flooding. With such events going on, some of us are prompted to relish the last hurrahs of Summer with some suitable tea moments. I’m here to show you how.

Keep the Iced Tea Flowing

For you folks who live in the warmer parts of the U.S. (primarily southern states), iced tea can be a year round phenomenon. But some folks up in those northern states can enjoy this version of tea also throughout the seasons. It can have a real psychological benefit, even when you’re enjoying it before a log fire and have three sweaters, a muffler, ear muffs, and two knit caps on, plus a blanket or two wrapped around your legs as you sit on the sofa before that fireplace ablaze.

Stick with Summer Tea Favorites

Some teas just seem to go naturally with the fun of Summer. Green teas with fruity flavors added come to mind here. The heavier tasting teas, such as Assam CTC black teas and Young Pu-erh, are more Wintry teas. They also go well with foods more popular in colder weather: macaroni and cheese, beef stew, pumpkin pie, etc. The lighter green tea flavors will not only squeeze out that last hurrah of Summer but go well with the last of the Summer time foods such as fresh strawberries and green salads. Even some grilled hotdogs and burgers would be good here, just to keep that picnic-like feeling going.

Pop a Summer Time Movie in the DVR

…or pull it up on Netflix. Whatever. Just get Beach Blanket Bingo or even Jaws going on the TV indoors so you can ignore the blizzard going on outdoors. Again, psychology is the key here. You might even call it self-hypnosis. Just as Dorothy had her magic phrase repeating while clicking together the heels of those ruby slippers, you can keep repeating this magic phrase: “There’s no time like Summer. There’s no time like Summer.”

Hope it works for you. I got a nice tan just writing this!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

In an article I recently wrote on tea drinking in the American colonies and the early United States I mentioned that a significant quantity of Japanese green tea was exported here during the latter part of the nineteenth century. Which led me to think that it might be interesting to look at Japanese tea history as it relates to interactions with the Western world.

Tea Growing Regions of Japan

Tea Growing Regions of Japan

While this is hardly an exhaustive study of the topic, one early reference that I found to tea and Japan comes from a book by Russian naval officer Vasily Mikhailovich Golovnin, that was quite popular in its day. Captivity in Japan During the Years 1811, 1812, 1813 came out in the early part of that century with the title serving a good summary of its contents. Golovnin makes numerous references to tea throughout, at one point remarking that it was served in “the Japanese fashion,” with cups half filled, no saucers and on trays of varnished wood.

A few decades later The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Miscellany remarked in an article about the East-India Company that at the time tea was being grown in most provinces of China, as well as Japan and a few other places. The article later notes that some of the tea grown in China at the time was making its way to various places, including Japan. Which is thought by most to be how tea got to Japan in the first place.

In 1873, in Harper’s magazine, an article called “Report on Tea Culture in Japan” took about a half of a page to discuss the topic. As of 1872, as mentioned above, most of the tea exported from Japan wound up in the US – about 15 million pounds for the year ending May 31. That tea was usually “refired” after processing to give it the “toasty flavor” and “greenish color” that were desirable here. The best tea in Japan was said to be grown by priests and, as is the case to this day, the first tea of the spring harvest was the most eagerly awaited.

If that’s not enough tea culture in Japan, consider that an article with a similar title – “Tea Culture in Japan” – appeared in 1907 in The Tropical Agriculturist and Magazine of the Ceylon Agricultural Society. It goes into much more depth – about six pages in all – than the aforementioned. Among the topics covered, a look at some of the teas grown in Japan and the growing regions, as well as detailed descriptions of each stage of processing for each type of tea.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

A pastry fork is totally indispensible. True. Have you ever tried to hold a plate in one hand and cut a piece off that slice of pie, tart, or other goodie residing on it with a regular fork? I have. Not a pretty sight. Makes a total mush of that lovely pastry (especially éclairs and cream puffs), British-style pudding (which is more like a cake), or other delectable goodie that some talented pastry chef slaved over in a hot kitchen for weeks (okay, it was probably just days…uh, hours…anyway, you get the point). So, why is a pastry fork (aka, a “pie fork”) indispensible? Glad you asked. Here’s why:

1 Only Three Tines

First, I need to clarify that this isn’t the kind of pastry fork used to work a batch of pastry dough prior to baking. It’s for using after all that hard work is done and you get to enjoy those efforts. Salad and dinner forks mostly have four tines. But a pastry fork has only three. And they are a bit further apart to spread them across the full head of the fork, which is the same width as the salad fork. Why is three tines better? Because of how that third one is shaped.

The pastry fork explained. (ETS image composite by A.C. Cargill)

The pastry fork explained. (ETS image composite by A.C. Cargill)

2 An Extra-Wide Third Tine

The third tine, counting left to right as shown in the image here) is twice as wide as the others. You are supposed to hold the plate in your left hand and cut a bite-sized piece out of the pastry or pie with the wide tine of the fork in your right hand. Thus this pastry fork is indispensible for the more casual style of tea time served buffet style.

3 Challenges Lefties

The one drawback is that pastry forks are designed for right-handed people. At least, I couldn’t find any online made for the lefties out there. So using such a fork will be a bit of a challenge for them. Maybe a left-handed pastry fork is needed. Any of you designers out there have a golden opportunity here. And an indispensible need for inventors is a problem to solve. And that’s the lack of a left-handed pastry fork!

4 Keeps Those Dessert Spoons Company

Dessert spoons can get pretty lonely in your silverware drawer. A lot of people think they are just an odd-shaped teaspoon. So, they generate a chuckle or two and then get passed over in favor of the more normal teaspoon. But those who discover the wonders of a pastry fork (the kind you eat with) will soon learn how well it pairs with the dessert spoon. According to an etiquette site, “Traditionally, a dessert spoon and dessert fork are used when eating such pastries as cream puffs and éclairs; the pastry is held in place with the spoon and cut and eaten with the fork.” So the pastry fork is indispensible for keeping the creamy fillings from squirting out too much. And for keeping dessert spoons from languishing in the silverware drawer.

5 A Conversation Starter

Whether you’re a leftie dealing with that awkward, odd-looking fork your host foisted on you, or just one prone to observing and commenting on unusual items that cross your path, you can certainly have plenty of conversational ammo here. Awkward pauses at tea time will be a thing of the past as your host regales you with an elaborate (and probably mostly fictional) account of how the pastry fork came to be while you spend your mental capacities working out which tidbit is fact and which is falderal. So the pastry fork is indispensible here, too!

Whatever the case, your tea time (solo or en masse) will be unforgettable, thanks to the indispensible pastry fork!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The name “bread pudding” often evokes feelings of good will and joy. Something mom used to make that just says love in every bite. This recipe is true decadence with no corners cut. Cinnamon rolls by themselves are wonderfully delicious. Though it is often true that several will be bought or made and it will take several days for one family to eat the all. The longer they sit the drier they can get. Now you can have them for breakfast and then make them into a spectacular dessert the next day. Brought back to life with warm tea and crisp juicy apples, it is sure to be unforgettable.

Tea Apple Cinnamon Roll Bread Pudding (photo by Janet Sanchez, all rights reserved)

Tea Apple Cinnamon Roll Bread Pudding (photo by Janet Sanchez, all rights reserved)

Preheat the oven to 350°F

2/3 cup apple cider
1 tbsp gold needle black tea
6-8 day old cinnamon rolls cut into 1 inch pieces
1 cup heavy cream
3 eggs
3 cups diced and peeled Granny Smith apples
2/3 cup brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon

Bring the cider to a boil, remove from heat and steep the tea in it for 5 minutes. Place the diced apples into a large mixing bowl along with the brown sugar and cinnamon and tea cider. Mix together, then add in the cinnamon roll pieces and toss until all the liquid has been absorbed. Beat the eggs and cream together in a bowl just until combined. Evenly distribute the cinnamon roll and apple mixture into a greased baking dish. Pour the egg and cream mixture evenly over the top. Let set at room temperature covered for 30 minutes. Place into the preheated oven for 55-65 minutes or until the center is done. Remove and serve with whip cream or ice cream.

Recipe serves about 8 people.

See more of Janet Sanchez’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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