Collectible Teapot and Tea Calendar 2015 (from Yahoo Images)

Collectible Teapot and Tea Calendar 2015 (from Yahoo Images)

When I wrote a profile of tea person and author Babette Donaldson a little while back it somehow escaped my notice that she had written a tea-themed book for children. Although I guess it’s more correct to call it a book for both children and adults. It’s called Fun With Tea: Activities for Tea Loving Adults to Share With Their Favorite Young Sippers and it’s described as a “teatime activity book for all ages and various kinds of tea parties.”

Over the years I’ve written about some of the various ways that tea has made its way into fiction and here’s yet another example. It’s the recently released Tempest in a Teapot, by Amanda Cooper. It’s billed as A Teapot Collector Mystery and it’s apparently the first in yet another series in the popular field of whimsical themed cozy mysteries. And while we’re speaking of teapots it’s as good a time as any to make a note on your calendar to pick up The Collectible Teapot & Tea Calendar 2015, by Annabel Freyberg and photographer Martin Brigdale.

Speaking of tea and fiction, one of the better known titles that uses tea and yet has nothing directly to do with tea is due for a reissue later this year – when it will appear for the first time in a trade paperback edition. That’s The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul, by the late Douglas Adams, best known for his The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

If it’s tea houses that thrill your soul then you might want to get a look at Neo-Chinese Style Tea Houses, which just made its way to bookstore shelves. Which I first mentioned in an article on tea houses and the like called A Space for Tea. It’s an impressive coffee table (pardon the expression) type book and as the description notes, it “showcases some of the most elegant teahouses, simple yet contemporary in design; beautiful corridors and intimate rooms lead towards escape and sanctuary with a unique purpose.”

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

There are guides to this and that, books for dummies by the shelf full, 101 ways to do this thing or the other, but nowhere have I found a book, web site, or even a single article just for those of us who point our pinkies while drinking tea. Time to rectify that situation.

The Demi is more demure, but the Full keeps would-be pilferers away from your tea! (From Yahoo! Images)

The Demi is more demure, but the Full keeps would-be pilferers away from your tea! (From Yahoo! Images)

Ignore Those Know-It-All Etiquette Overlords

There are dozens and dozens of sites out there claiming to know what proper tea etiquette, including whether or not to point your pinky, consists of. (One thing is certain: I just ended that sentence in a preposition, but it’s less awkward sounding than the correct way.) They claim that pinkie pointing is a way for those of inferior breeding to look like the elites.

Supposedly, pinkie pointing was done by the aristocracy for various reasons (I’ve seen everything from saving their pinkies to stir spices into their foods – ugh! – to giving a “come hither” sign by one of those dainty aristocratic ladies to the lord, chamberlain, or page boy that caught her eye). Many claim it is a natural action, but that is up for debate. I say do whichever you please and tell the naysayers to go chase after that mom who let her kid eat that bug he/she found crawling around on that jungle gym at the playground.

Choose the Full versus Demi Pinkie Point

We all have our own personality – or should I say personaliTEA? – and so we have to choose our own style of pointing that pinkie. The more gregarious among you will want to engage in the full pinkie point. That pinkie will be extended all the way out and at a bold, “in your face” angle. Those around you will be well-advised to keep a safe distance lest they get a poke in the eye as you raise up that cuppa for a sip.

The more demure and/or timid tea drinker will do the demi pinkie point. This is my preferred method since I am loathe to ram a fellow tea lover while I am trying to imbibe. I have also poked my own eye a time or two trying that full out pinkie pointing maneuver. It took some doing and involved tea spillage.

How NOT to Use That Pinkie

While the mavens of etiquette squabble over class distinctions and rudeness, I will bring up a few practical “do nots” about pinkies.

  • Your pinkie is not a napkin. Using it to wipe away jam and clotted cream from the corners of your mouth, especially if you then lick off that jam and clotted cream from your pinkie, is a “do not” for sure.
  • Your pinkie is not a facial tissue. This is even more important. A definite “do not.” If you need to … uh … remove … uh … dislodge … uh … relieve a situation, then go for an actual facial tissue.
  • Your pinkie is not a spoon, fork, knife, etc. So, those folks who think pinkie pointing was a way to keep the digit clean to use as a utensil are a bit off. Same goes for those who think the nail on their pinkie is a suitable substitute for a toothpick.

Respect your pinkie, whether you decide to point it while raising that cup or not!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

When thinking of having that perfect cup of tea several wonderful things come to mind that might accompany such a wonderful beverage. Cakes and cookies are a perfectly good option, but biscuits with honey are on the menu today. A warm buttery biscuit with that tangy sweet honey that pairs so perfectly with a cup of tea. Oh, how delightful!

Tea Buttermilk Biscuits with Honey (photo by Janet Sanchez, all rights reserved)

Tea Buttermilk Biscuits with Honey (photo by Janet Sanchez, all rights reserved)

Preparation:

1 ¼ cup cold buttermilk
1 tbsp Golden Needle black tea (Substitute: Puerh or a very strong short steeping time tea)
1 tbsp boiling water

In a small cup combine the boiling water and tea. Steep for about 30 seconds to a minutes or until much of the liquid has been absorbed by the tea leaves. Pour the plumped tea leaves into the cold buttermilk. Let set in the fridge for at least 2 but up to 8 hours. Then remove the leaves from the buttermilk.

Recipe:

Preheat oven to 425°

2 ½ cups flour
1/8 cup sugar
¼ tsp salt
1 tbsp baking powder
¼ cup cold butter
¼ cup shortening
2 tbsp melted butter

Combine flour, sugar, salt and baking powder in a food processor or bowl. Cut the butter and shortening into small pieces. Place the cut pieces into the flour mixture and combine.  If using a food processor pulse until combined. If using a bowl, take a pastry cutter or fork and cut in the butter and shortening until the mixture is mealy. Either method should give you the same result. Slowly add in the tea buttermilk until combined. The dough should be wet and form a lump. Pour out onto a floured surface. Flour a rolling pin and roll the dough out to about ½ inch thick. Use a biscuit cutter and cut out the biscuits. Brush the top of each biscuit with the melted butter and place into a 425° preheated oven. Bake for 12-15 minutes.

The yield will vary depending on the size of the cutter. Using a 3½ inch biscuit cutter this recipe will garner about 8 biscuits.

See more of Janet Sanchez’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

There you are pouring tea for your guests and yourself (the tea time “mother” always pours for herself last), and the teapot is dripping all over the place every time you tilt it back up after the pour. How awkward! What can you do about that drippy teapot spout? Well, I have several suggestions. But first, a bit about why teapots drip…yes, there is a reason other than just to annoy you.

1 - Yellow lemon, 2 - white paper (disposable), 3 - red hand-crocheted, and 4 - a combo drip catcher lid holder. (From Yahoo! Images)

1 – Yellow lemon, 2 – white paper (disposable), 3 – red hand-crocheted, and 4 – a combo drip catcher lid holder. (From Yahoo! Images)

Why Teapots Drip

For decades this very question has plagued the scientifically minded as well as the rest of us. Many physicists thought it had to do with the surface tension of water – the force that holds a drop of water together and that gets broken when you boil water, causing those air bubbles. Finally, though, a very plausible and reasonable answer has been put forward by a distinguished professor of engineering and mathematics: Dr. Joseph B. Keller. First, a fellow scientist showed that it was not surface tension causing those drips (easy to disprove a theory and much of scientific effort is spent on doing just that). Then, Dr. Keller showed in his paper, The Teapot Effect, that it was air pressure causing the drips. I know, probably more than you care to think about when serving tea. But it helps to know what causes a problem so you know how to solve it, bringing us to the following:

Solution #1: Use a Drip Catcher

The drip catcher comes in two basic styles: those that fit over the spout and those that hang from the spout with cords and a decorative element that fits over the teapot to also hold the lid on. Each has benefits and issues. Even the cutest ones can be odd looking on your gorgeous fine bone china teapot, and they can get so filled up that they start dripping, plus they get tea-stained over time.

Solution #2: Use a Small Cloth

The cloth will get tea-stained. Very. So use something close to the color of the tea you are serving. A nice reddish brown (raw or even burnt sienna) comes to mind here. It would even work for teas where the liquid is lighter. Just remember to wash it now and then, like you do for your oven mitts, potholders, aprons, napkins, tablecloths, etc.

Solution #3: Shop for a Non-dripping Teapot

The spout shape is the key. Some spouts are made for dripping and others aren’t. Back to Dr. Keller here, who claims he can look at a teapot spout and tell you if it’s a dripper or not. Two things to look for:

  1. A teapot spout that points up and then straight down at the pouring end – dripping is prevented because the tea will flow back into the pot when the pot is turned upright again
  2. Avoid the sharp spout like most metallic teapots have – that sharp edge assures a drip since the tea can’t flow back into the pot.

He further advises against overfilling the teapot, since the lower the volume of tea in the pot, the faster it will flow and the less likely it will cling to the spout tip.

One Final Note

I bought one of those metal springy things that you insert into the teapot spout to prevent drips. It worsened them. Just wanted to let you know.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Australia, home of billy tea

Australia, home of billy tea

For tea at its most basic (and probably hair-raisingly strong) you might try preparing it in the manner that’s used in the Australian bush – using a billycan, sometimes simply referred to as a billy. Rather than attempt to instruct you in this art I’ll point you to our previous articles on the topic. As the story goes, this no-frills item of tea gadgetry took its name from the cans that were used to ship corned beef to Australia, which back in the day were pressed into service to make tea.

It might sound like pretty simple stuff, but according to at least one scholar, it might not be so, at least not if you closely analyze a certain popular song that references this object. Death Watch: Reading the Common Object of the Billycan in ‘Waltzing Matilda’ is some pretty deep stuff, if you ask me, but there it is. For a more down to earth explanation of why there were two versions of this great old Australian tune, one that was altered a bit in service of product placement, have a look at this article from the Australian press.

As the article notes, there was once an actual Billy Tea Company. Further research reveals that this was started by a Scottish businessman in 1881 and a couple decades later began using said song to push its products. Some decades later the song was so popular that it received a substantial chunk of votes recommending it as a new national anthem – which didn’t happen. More details here and have a look at some Billy Tea advertising material here.

It’s hard to say exactly when this sort of thing came about but one of the oldest references I was able to find comes from 1849. In a volume called The Working Man’s Handbook to South Australia: With Advice to the Farmer, and Detailed Information for the Several Classes of Labourers and Artizans, by George Blakinston Wilkinson, the billy is synonymous with a tea kettle. But for the last word on billycans, billy tea and the like don’t miss this article from the National Museum of Australia that’s enhanced with a number of interesting photos and drawings.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The buzz these days seems to be about tea from Nepal. You know, that little country spread across the Himalayas just north of the Bihar state in India which is becoming more of a contender in tea production, too. I thought, therefore, the time had come to take a closer look.

Kanyam Tea Garden, Ilam, Nepal

Kanyam Tea Garden, Ilam, Nepal

Key Gardens and Producers

The Ilam district boasts two main tea gardens: the Ilam Tea Garden near the Ilam Bazaar, and the Kanyam Tea Garden, halfway between Ilam Bazaar and the plains of the Terai. There are smaller gardens such as Tinjure. Other major tea producing districts are Dhankuta, Sankuwashabha, Terathum, and Bhojpur districts.

The Himalayan Tea Producers Cooperative Ltd. (HIMCOOP)

Like growers elsewhere, the tea farmers and producers in Nepal recognize there is strength in numbers. The Himalayan Tea Producers Cooperative Ltd. (HIMCOOP) was established in 2003 and provides these tea producers who focus on more high-quality teas a common platform for selling to an international market. They currently represent 20 different factories and estates that produce a variety of teas (white, green, black, and oolong).

More Gardens

Jun Chiyabari Tea Garden, established around 2000-2001, is located in the hills around Hile in Dhankuta district in the eastern Himalayan region of Nepal. It is at an elevation of about 1600-2000 meters. Like many of the gardens in Nepal, this one is relatively small (about 75 hectares, with 50 hectares planted in tea). The plants are young compared to those in Darjeeling and China and are cultivars from not only Nepal but Darjeeling, Taiwan, and Japan.

Mist Valley Tea, founded by the late Asal Bahadur Limbu, is in Jitpur in eastern Nepal. The small rural village is frequently enveloped by mist and fog, giving it the nickname used for the company. The garden is known as one of the best manicured around and has a factory for processing and packaging the teas (currently about 100,000 kgs per year of premium tea). Other tea gardeners also bring their leaves to the factory for processing.

Darjeeling (#1) vs Nepalese (#2) (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Darjeeling (#1) vs Nepalese (#2) (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Some Quick Facts About Nepali Teas

Here’s a quick rundown:

  • Two general categories: orthodox and CTC
  • Four flushes: 1st (4th week of March thru end of April); 2nd (2nd week of May thru end of July); Monsoon (last week of July thru September); and Autumn (October thru November).
  • While flavors of the the flushes for orthodox teas varies, the CTC teas are fairly consistent in their flavors.
  • Flavors between Darjeeling and Nepalese teas are almost indistinguishable, as hubby and I discovered recently.

Give them a try some time and see for yourself.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

I ran across a press release recently that announced that a certain well known convenience store chain was rolling out something called “fresh-brewed” iced tea in its stores. Which got me to wondering. I’ve seen this phrase used before and have never thought much about it, but just exactly what does fresh-brewed tea mean? I have my own thoughts on the matter. Which is to expect that “fresh-brewed” iced tea would be tea made on the spot from actual tea leaves.

But exactly how would this work, especially in the busy environment of a convenience store or a restaurant or somewhere where the employees don’t necessarily have a lot of time to spend on steeping tea leaves? As it so happens, the press release in question suggests that actual tea leaves are steeped as needed, with a “proprietary blend of black tea leaves” that are “brewed fresh throughout the day” and “dispensed from lined, stainless-steel urns.” I’m sure we’ve all seen the latter in our convenience store or restaurant of choice. On the flip side, the company also offers a liquid tea concentrate for those times when circumstances preclude whipping up a batch of the real thing.

According to the web site of a firm that claims to be the top supplier of iced tea to the foodservice market in the United States, they deliver “fresh brewed taste prepared from choice tea leaves,” using blends of tea leaves from China and other parts of Asia and South America. They go on to reveal that they use a patented type of square tea bag in which said leaves are actually contained and steeped. So it appears that for this foodservice iced tea behemoth, at least, fresh-brewed might actually mean what it says.

Of course, like anything else in the great wide world of tea, methods and results are sure to vary from place to place. As a general rule, I’ve found that iced tea that’s available in these settings often leaves a lot to be desired, with some of it dipping into the barely drinkable category. But that’s not a given and I should point out that one of the best iced teas I’d ever had the good fortune to sample was served at a restaurant I used to frequent – from one of those “lined, stainless-steel urns.”

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

C Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The avalanche of tea books seems neverending, with many of them highlighted on this blog by my fellow blogger Bill Lengeman (his latest: Recent and Upcoming Tea Books 17). At some point my mind starts to overheat, the gears start to go “Screeeeee!” and I call out “Enough!” The next words out of my mouth are usually “Are there too many tea books?” As usual, it depends.

Sipping Vanilla Comoro while leafing through “The Harney & Sons Guide to Tea” (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Sipping Vanilla Comoro while leafing through “The Harney & Sons Guide to Tea” (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

“Too many” usually means there is far more than is needed to meet a specific requirement. In my early days of writing about tea, my Harney & Sons tea book was a must, but a horde of books on tea would have been repetitive and overwhelming. This book covers basics and helps those just starting to learn about tea. Another book called simply Tea was also a great intro. And it has lots more large, gorgeous photos. Ah! The visually oriented part of my brain was made very happy.

“The China Tea Book” – gorgeous and informative! (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

“The China Tea Book” – gorgeous and informative! (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Sooner or later, tea drinkers find that they want to focus on certain types of tea. In my case, I am shifting more towards an Asian experience (it’s about 20% of my tea drinking right now) and so wanted to focus my reading more in that direction. So, when I had the chance to receive a review copy of a book about tea in China, I said “Sure!” So, my tea library grew when The China Tea Book arrived. Great info and more gorgeous photos. The perfect book to peruse during my Afternoon Oolong session.

In between the books named above, other tea books came my way, some fiction, some more factual, and some a total jumble. Some were fun reads, others bored me to tears. But I digress. The question still remains about there being “too many” tea books.

As far as the world is concerned, there can probably never be too many tea books, but for my little library, I’m going to be very selective and avoid the daily barrage of new tea books that come on the market. One reason: most of them repeat information I can readily find elsewhere and others are published more as vanity books than to add to the array of knowledge about tea. That brings up another question: are there too many inaccurate and frivolous books out there about tea? The answer is……

Sorry, that’s for another article!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Whilst in Brussels, I managed to find time to stop by the delightfully named Pepper Mint Tea Room. Although they do a well-rounded menu of quiches, salads, sweet treats, wine, and beer (it is Belgium, after all), their most extensive offering is tea. With a separate tea menu listing more than forty different tea options, this is definitely a place for tea lovers to stop by if in the neighbourhood. They serve tea for one or two, and also sell it loose should you care to take some home with you.

Tarte Meringuée at The Pepper Mint Tea Room (photo by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved)

Tarte Meringuée at The Pepper Mint Tea Room (photo by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved)

Perusing their long list of teas, there were several options that stood out. Rather than go for one of the classic teas, I thought I would try something a little more unusual. I found just such a tea in the somewhat extravagantly named “Tarte Meringuée.” This tea combines white tea, green tea, sencha (yes, I know sencha is also green tea, but this is what the menu says…) with pineapple, papaya, grapes, coriander, cinnamon, coco, cardamom, mango, meringue, orange, lemon, apricot, and grilled almonds. Ok, so maybe it’s not the name that is extravagant, but the tea itself! In any case, this tea was a new item of theirs and one of the more interesting ones on the menu, so I thought I would give it a try.

Not quite knowing what to expect from a mixture of white and green tea with all of those flavours, I was pleasantly surprised. Of the spices, the cinnamon flavour was the strongest, but was not overpowering. The fruit flavours come through the spice, but again, their sweetness was not overpowering, and the combination of so many flavours prevented the tea from tasting too much like any one fruit. Overall, the sweet and the spice balanced each other out very nicely. As for the mix of the green and white tea, again one did not overpower the other; it did not feel like I was drinking either a green tea or a white tea. The resulting in-between flavour (which came through despite all of the added fruits and spices!) was mellow and very pleasant.

In addition to offering a wide range of teas, the Pepper Mint Tea Room also knows how to serve it; my tea arrived brewing in a tetsubin (cast iron teapot) of a very respectable size, complete with Japanese-style teawares from which to enjoy my tea. If I’m in the city again, this is a definitely a place I will come back to!

See more of Elise Nuding’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The “fish out of water” theme shows up in movies as a favorite. We all like to watch people coping with situations that are outside of their ordinary environment. The movie about the Aussie crocodile wrestler in New York City is one that made its star/writer/producer a millionaire almost overnight. And then there’s the time travel movies which have that “fish out of water” element to them, starting with H.G. Wells The Time Machine. Witness has a police detective seeing what life is like up close and personal for an Amish community. The examples roll on and on. This site has a whole list of them. And when it comes to tea, you can feel like a bit of a fish out of water as you begin learning more and more of its intricacies.

Chashitsu (Japanese tea room for Chanoyu) (Screen capture from site)

Chashitsu (Japanese tea room for Chanoyu) (Screen capture from site)

Your tea world consists of the tea or teas you are used to drinking and the way you are used to preparing and enjoying them. Consider this scenario:

You have your favorite bagged tea. You grab your favorite mug, fill it with water, stick it in the microwave and zap it until the water is boiling like crazy. Then you remove the mug (carefully to avoid the popping bubbles that can scald – been there, done that) and dunk in that teabag. If it’s the kind with a string and tag attached, you may have the habit of dunking the bag up and down in the water. When the tea is dark enough, you pull the bag out, squeeze it as best you can or just toss it (leaving a trail of drips), and either gulp the scalding tea right away or add stuff to it, whichever your personal taste dictates.

Now, imagine yourself suddenly transported to Japan (assuming you aren’t already there). You’ll encounter things like this:

Everyone around you seems to be drinking tea all day long. (They actually drink an average of 3 to 4 cups of tea per day.) Almost all of the tea will be green. But there are many different kinds. There are tearooms (chashitsu) all over that you can go to and experience the tea ceremony (Cha no yu, 茶の湯). Tea at the better restaurants is served with or at the end of the meal and is free. You can also find tea at some temples and gardens, usually served in the tranquil environment of a tatami room and with a Japanese sweet. Bottled tea is also common at stores and vending machines. Add to that the sitting on the floor in a toe-crunching, knee-stiffening position, and the culture shock can be rather acute.

Of course, tea in other Asian countries and India is equally vastly different than what Westerners do. Chawallahs in India, for example, have their milky, spicy tea available throughout the day. Tea is often made in a saucepan on an open flame. Asian tea times often involve multiple steepings of the same tea leaves and in small amounts where you barely get a mouthful in the handleless cup. You are meant to slow down and enjoy, not rush and steep and gulp on the go.

The one good thing about these “fish out of water” movies is that sooner or later you not only get adjusted to those new surroundings, but at some point you end up back in your own environment. But the best part is bringing back home with you that new perspective gained in your sojourn. The same is true of trying a new tea. Enjoy!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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