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Tea drinkers often fall into one of two categories: those with iron-clad tea habits and those without. These tea habits may involve drinking only specific types of tea at specific times, using specific tea wares with specific teas, or always steeping certain teas in certain ways. I certainly have some tea habits; however, they are far from iron-clad as my tea habits often shift depending on what my schedule is during a given period or on what I am doing.

Which tea are you in the habit of drinking? (ETS image)

Which tea are you in the habit of drinking? (ETS image)

One of the things that tends to shift the most is the amount of tea that I drink—whether this is the overall amount or the amount of certain types of tea. If you are anything like me, you may go through periods when your tea consumption goes up or down, sometimes incrementally, sometimes more so. It could depend upon things like increased workload, more free time, or simply having more tea in the house.

Recently, I noticed that my black tea consumption went up considerably. This was in part due to a lack of access to the other teas that I normally drink (rather tragically, I ran out of both my Japanese green tea and my oolong around the same time), and in part due to an increased need for afternoon pick-me-ups (the result of a heavy workload and not quite enough sleep). For the most part, this was not really a problem— indeed, many people would consider getting to drink more tea an excellent thing— and I certainly do not have any complaints tastewise. However, in this particular instance, I found myself becoming less sensitive to the caffeine in the tea. The effect was twofold: firstly, I felt the need to drink even more tea (again, not such a terrible thing for my taste buds), and secondly, I found myself defaulting to black tea over green or oolong, even when I once again had access to those teas.

Although it is tempting to put that behavior down to a dependency on caffeine, the issue of caffeine levels in tea is not as straightforward as it is often claimed to be (take a look at this article for an insight into the complications surrounding the issue), and my defaulting to black tea was really just a taste habit. I had got into the habit of drinking a lot of black tea, and this is what my body expected when I thought of having a cup of tea. Luckily, it didn’t take too long to remind myself why I also drink a lot of green and oolong tea— just a cup or two and my taste buds were back on board. Nevertheless, it did take a few days to stop myself automatically reaching for my tin of black tea when I felt the urge to brew up a cuppa—to kick the black tea habit, if you will. And whilst having a black tea habit falls pretty low on the cause-for-concern scale, it did leave me with one thought: tea habits, like any habits, can be hard things to break.

See more of Elise Nuding’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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“Café by day. Bar by night. Fun things to do.”

This is how Drink, Shop & Do describes itself, and this London tea spot certainly does offer a wide variety of entertainment. As well as serving food and drink, it hosts a range of events from dancing, to poetry readings, to arts and crafts activities, to live DJ sessions. But it was their food and drink that was my focus on a recent visit—or, to be specific, their tea.

Interior of Drink, Shop & Do - party time! (photo from their web site)

Interior of Drink, Shop & Do – party time! (photo from their web site)

Drink, Shop & Do has a lovely selection of loose teas, which are ordered by the pot. In addition to the unflavoured black teas, several flavoured black teas sit alongside a range of rooibos infusions, a white tea, and a standard (but still tasty) Japanese green tea (they did not specify which one, but my guess is a sencha). I was there with a few friends and since we ordered different teas I was able to sample more than just one of Drink, Shop & Do’s offerings.

I ordered the green tea (the suspected sencha), and it was no more nor less than what I would expect: the slightly sweet, grassy taste of green tea came through clearly, and the presence of an infuser allowed me to steep it to my preferred strength. One tea companion ordered the chai — not a traditional Indian masala chai, but a black tea flavoured with various spices. It was very aromatic, and flavourful to boot; the spices were deliciously strong. However, if you are not partial to strongly spiced teas, this chai may not be one that you would enjoy. The third tea drinker in our party ordered a classic: Earl Grey. This Early Grey blend had a decently strong black base, which meant that, although it was still aromatic, for me this would be a morning brew rather than a light afternoon tea. But since I find it hard to go wrong with an Earl Grey, this tea certainly got my approval.

Perhaps one of the most enjoyable things about Drink, Shop & Do is its décor. The furniture is charmingly mismatched, and the colourful interior gives the café a fun vibe. The mismatched theme continues in their teawares, and it is always a lovely surprise to see what style of teacup and teapot your tea will arrive in. And, significantly for this tea drinker, most of their teapots are very generously sized. One of our party actually found himself unable to finish his pot—not a common occurrence, I can assure you! But fear not, the unwanted tea did not stay unwanted for long.

All in all, Drink, Shop & Do is a lovely place to stop off for a (large) pot of tea. And, if you are up for something a little more extravagant, or if you fancy a bite to eat, they also do a traditional Afternoon Tea, along with several variations on the theme (such as “Boozy Afternoon Tea” and “Man’s Afternoon Tea”)…

Tempting. Perhaps I’ll sample some of those on my next visit.

Can’t get to London? Shop for the same tasty teas here.

See more of Elise Nuding’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

During my stay in Brussels I found time to stop by the A.M. Sweet Tea Room, which is conveniently located near the old city centre. A.M. Sweet Teahouse serves a wide range of loose tea, all sourced from the Mariage Frères tea company. Their tea menu includes several Japanese green teas, an extensive range of flavoured green teas, a number of pure black teas, flavoured black teas, several rooibos, a few oolongs, and a white tea.

Shop sign photo from their blog

Shop sign photo from their blog

Among their green teas, I spotted one with which I was not familiar: Fuji-yama. This Japanese green tea is grown near Mount Fuji, and, according to the menu’s description, is defined by its “fine leaves, grand aroma, and subtle taste.” As a green tea fan who is always curious to try new varieties, I opted for Fuji-yama. My tea came served in a teapot with a loose leaf infuser, along with a complimentary, typically Belgian, biscuit. As you might expect, Fuji-yama had the distinctive grassy, slightly sweet taste that is characteristic of Japanese green teas. However, although it was not quite as grassy and sweet as a Gyokuro, it was slightly richer and more full-flavoured than a sencha.

A bit of gyokuro (photo by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved)

A bit of gyokuro (photo by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved)

On top of a tasty tea, the cosy interior and the very lovely, welcoming owner made my experience at the A.M. Sweet Tea Room an extremely pleasant one. And in case you need anything to accompany your tea, they also offers a delicious range of baked goods and sweet treats (both to eat whilst you are there, or packaged up to enjoy later or give to someone as a gift)—including, of course, some bona fide Belgian chocolates!

See more of Elise Nuding’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Whilst in Brussels, I managed to find time to stop by the delightfully named Pepper Mint Tea Room. Although they do a well-rounded menu of quiches, salads, sweet treats, wine, and beer (it is Belgium, after all), their most extensive offering is tea. With a separate tea menu listing more than forty different tea options, this is definitely a place for tea lovers to stop by if in the neighbourhood. They serve tea for one or two, and also sell it loose should you care to take some home with you.

Tarte Meringuée at The Pepper Mint Tea Room (photo by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved)

Tarte Meringuée at The Pepper Mint Tea Room (photo by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved)

Perusing their long list of teas, there were several options that stood out. Rather than go for one of the classic teas, I thought I would try something a little more unusual. I found just such a tea in the somewhat extravagantly named “Tarte Meringuée.” This tea combines white tea, green tea, sencha (yes, I know sencha is also green tea, but this is what the menu says…) with pineapple, papaya, grapes, coriander, cinnamon, coco, cardamom, mango, meringue, orange, lemon, apricot, and grilled almonds. Ok, so maybe it’s not the name that is extravagant, but the tea itself! In any case, this tea was a new item of theirs and one of the more interesting ones on the menu, so I thought I would give it a try.

Not quite knowing what to expect from a mixture of white and green tea with all of those flavours, I was pleasantly surprised. Of the spices, the cinnamon flavour was the strongest, but was not overpowering. The fruit flavours come through the spice, but again, their sweetness was not overpowering, and the combination of so many flavours prevented the tea from tasting too much like any one fruit. Overall, the sweet and the spice balanced each other out very nicely. As for the mix of the green and white tea, again one did not overpower the other; it did not feel like I was drinking either a green tea or a white tea. The resulting in-between flavour (which came through despite all of the added fruits and spices!) was mellow and very pleasant.

In addition to offering a wide range of teas, the Pepper Mint Tea Room also knows how to serve it; my tea arrived brewing in a tetsubin (cast iron teapot) of a very respectable size, complete with Japanese-style teawares from which to enjoy my tea. If I’m in the city again, this is a definitely a place I will come back to!

See more of Elise Nuding’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

As recently discussed on this blog, there is a new(ish) tea plantation in Perthshire, Scotland. Being home to 2,000 Camellia sinensis plants, it is, apparently, one of the largest tea plantations in Europe. The interesting thing about this is that, considering that Asia (and to a lesser extend Africa) is the major tea-growing continent, there actually are a number of tea plantations in Europe. The increasing popularity of growing tea locally (local to its European consumers, that is) is certainly interesting, but is it merely a novelty?

I think that there are multiple reasons for the growing trend (pun intended) of local tea cultivation. The increasing emphasis on locally grown products is something seen across the food industry as more and more attention is paid to the environmental costs of shipping food around the globe. Additionally, supporting local businesses is attractive to many consumers. And for tea fans, the chance to try a new variety of tea and to experience how different growing locations give rise to different subtleties of taste holds obvious appeal.

But is this local tea cultivation more than a novelty, more than a passing trend? I would like to think so, as increasing the variety of tea being grown can only be a good thing—after all, it means more variety in the tea being sold, giving tea lovers more options to explore, compare, and contrast. It diversifies the market, and makes it more of a truly global industry.

But on the other hand, locally grown tea will almost certainly cost more than your standard tea imported from the tea plantations of China, India, or Kenya—it is inevitable considering the difference in the scale, and consequently cost, of tea production in these different places. In many cases, the locally grown tea will have to be blended with tea that is not local to make the venture financially viable. And if this is the case, is it really worth purchasing “locally grown” tea?

However, just like any specialty food product, if it is something you enjoy, you will probably decide that it is worth spending a little bit more on. It is unlikely that these local teas will replace the staple (cheap) teas, and so they are just one more option for a specialty tea blend—one that happens to be locally grown.

So where do I stand in regards to the local tea trend? Well, at the end of the day I am much less concerned with where the tea is grown than how it tastes; if the tea is good, I will drink it.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

London is a city full of lovely tea spots where you can stop in and enjoy a nice cuppa. Yumchaa is one of those, and what’s more, it is a spot that deals exclusively in loose leaf tea. In fact, they are positively militant about the absence of bags, sachets, or any other device that might imprison the venerable tea leaf—one of their slogans is “Say no to tea bagging, say yes to freedom!”

Tea at Yumchaa (photo by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved)

Tea at Yumchaa (photo by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved)

Slogans like this make them my kind of people (although I must admit, I do enjoy the occasional bagged tea brand for a standard cuppa). They have several locations around London, and as well as tea shops where you can stop in for a cup of tea and a slice of cake, they also have stalls at many of the markets around London where you can pick up some tea to take home.

I ventured into their tea shop near Goodge Street (their newest shop), which has a beautiful interior lit by the natural daylight that floods through the large central skylight. If I were well versed in interior design lingo, I might call it “shabby chic”, but as I am not, I will just say that I liked their eclectic chair collection.

The first thing that I found to my liking (or the second if you count the chairs) is that Yumchaa provides a small loose sample of each of their teas, allowing you to let the aroma of the dry tea help you decide whether the tea is what you think it is (I am surely not the only one who has opted for a tea that turns out to smell/taste quite different from what its description suggested!).

With 14 black teas, 12 green teas, 6 white teas, and a number of tisanes to boot, I was certainly not short on options. However, one tiny discrepancy that caught my attention was that they lumped their only oolong—Tie Guan Yin, or Iron Goddess of Mercy—in with the green teas, which in my book is a bit of a tea faux pas.

A categorisation discrepancy aside, their tea selection was enticing. Wanting to try something different from my usual tea preferences, I decided on a flavoured green tea called ‘Wanderlust”. I am not usually that partial to flavoured green teas, especially since I am not really a fruity tea person (most flavoured green teas involve some sort of fruit). But “Wanderlust” caught my attention because, although it uses apple, the fruit is combined with cinnamon and almond. Curious to see whether the spices and nuts tipped the balance of flavours in my favour, I ordered a pot. I was not disappointed. The apple flavour was still prevalent, but it was a fruity undertone rather than an overtone, and the cinnamon and almond came through nicely. What is more, it came served in a good-sized pot, complete with a strainer to prevent leaf fragments making their way into my cup.

Tasty tea, a good selection of teawares, and a nice atmosphere—I am certainly looking forward to returning to Yumchaa to see whether their other teas meet the standards set by this visit.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

We’ve all been there: there’s that tin of tea lurking at the back of your cupboard, boldly asserting its continued existence as you make a quick grab for your favourite teas at the front of the shelf. This lurker is the tea that you thought you were going to love but somehow never quite managed to enjoy properly, the tea that you were given as a gift and never opened, the tea that is almost the same the one you drink all the time, except not as good…

There comes a turning point with these teas, when you can no longer abide their silent skulking. Or maybe it’s just because you’ve run out of space on the shelf. In any case, there comes a point when you need to decide how to deal with these un-drunk teas. If it’s a tea you are convinced you just do not like, you may opt to throw it away, with no regrets.

The Tea Taste by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved

The Tea Taste by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved

However, sometimes it’s more complicated. Perhaps you are one of those people who feel guilt-ridden whenever they throw things away unnecessarily.  Whatever the reason, you may find yourself having to submit this unloved tea to The Tea Test; that is, you may have to try it.

The Tea Test can be a dodgy business, especially if the tea has been sitting on that shelf for a while. Is the tea still good for drinking? Did that tea tin do its job? There is only one way to find out—after all, what’s the worst that could happen? A bad cup of tea? Granted, this is a sorry affair, and if the tea is no longer drinkable because it’s sat there too long, it will have to head for the bin. However, you might also find that the tea is still perfectly fresh and drinkable. What’s more, you might even enjoy it! After all, for many of us, tea tastes do change…

See more of Elise Nuding’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Tea cafe in Stockholm by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved

Tea cafe in Stockholm by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved

As I discovered on a recent visit to Stockholm, despite the country being a nation of coffee drinkers, many cafés stock a good tea selection. In recognition of the numerous options for stopping for tea in Stockholm, here is a quick run down (but by no means an exhaustive list!) of a few places that you can be assured of a quality cup of tea:

il caffé

This trendy little café is located on Drottninggatan in the district of Södermalm, and is a great spot to stop at if you are in the area. Södermalm is the district south of Gamla Stan (the old city) that hosts numerous boutiques, and which is generally considered as the more bohemian, younger and trendier part of Stockholm. This café fits right in, and has some delicious “bullar” (Swedish buns) to boot. A good coffee selection is a given, but their tea options are also nothing to sneer at. They offer a couple of black teas, a chai, green tea, a rooibos infusion, and the Swedish signature tea, Söder tea. Also known as Söderblandning, this is a black tea blended with tropical fruits that originated not just in Stockholm, but in Södermalm—the very district in which il caffé is located! I have actually come across this tea before—in Minneapolis, MN, no less—but, being in Södermalm, this was the obvious choice for a nice hot cuppa at il caffé, and I whiled away a pleasant hour or so sipping this flavourful, fruity blend.

Vette Katten

Vette Katten is a traditional Swedish Konditori (a cross between a bakery, pastry shop, and coffee house) and one of the places to go in Stockholm for ‘fika’—the Swedish institution that could be compared to the Brits afternoon tea. Fika traditionally consists of drinking coffee accompanied by something sweet, usually a pastry. But if tea is more your thing, there are plenty of options here, too. They offer two types of Earl Grey, Söderblandning, a green Söderblandning, Gunpowder tea, Ceylon, a rooibos infusion, and a chai blend. And the pastries, I can assure you, are superb.

Chaikhana in Stockholm by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved

Chaikhana in Stockholm by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved

Chaikhana Teahouse

Located in Gamla Stan (the old city), this is a place to wander towards if you fancy more than just the standard loose leaf options found in other cafés, especially if your tastes lean towards traditional East Asian teas. They serve teas from Japan, China, Taiwan, Kenya, South Africa and India, which span various green, black, rooibos, and oolong varieties. In addition, they offer a traditional English Afternoon Tea spread, and also a variation on this called “French Afternoon Tea.” There is brioche involved…worth a try, I should think!

Kafe Kladdkakan

This café is also located in Gamla Stan, along Stora Nygatan. A welcoming, cosy café with comfy seats and lots of cushions, it was perfect for spending an hour reading over a cup of tea whilst I waited for a friend. I spent a good few minutes scanning the names of the various teas lined up in tins behind the counter, but eventually settled on a sencha.. To top it off, as this tea drinker was extremely gratified to discover, they serve their tea in very large cups. Perfect!

See more of Elise Nuding’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Considering that the Swedes are avid coffee drinkers, stopping for tea in Stockholm might seem like a futile endeavour. But, as this intrepid tea explorer discovered, that is far from true.

My Stockholm tea experience, complete with tasty bun! (photo by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved)

My Stockholm tea experience, complete with tasty bun! (photo by Elise Nuding, all rights reserved)

Despite the prevailing image of America as a nation of coffee addicts, the land of the free and the home of the brave is far outstripped by not just one or two, but a number of countries in terms of coffee drinking. This includes Sweden, which is right up there in terms of coffee consumption per capita — depending on what statistics you look at, Sweden numbers between second and sixth on the list.

In other words, the Swedes are not tea drinkers in the way that the British are; that is, tea drinking does not feature in daily rituals and survival tactics in quite the same way that it does across the pond. However, tea drinkers will be pleased to discover that this does not mean that finding a decent cuppa in Stockholm is out of the question. In fact, far from it — I was surprised (and pleased!) to discover that most, if not all, of the cafés that I stopped into in Stockholm seemed to offer some sort of tea selection. And I am not talking about a couple of bagged options — almost every café that I stopped into offered a decent range of loose teas!

One such example is the café Under Kastanjen ( ‘Under the Chestnut Tree’). This café is located in the heart of Gamla Stan (‘the old city’), where narrow winding streets are filled with beautiful old buildings of various shades of red, orange, and yellow. This café’s tea selection includes the standard options of English Breakfast and Earl Grey, but they also offer three rooibos infusions, an herbal infusion, a white tea, sencha, and a few fruity tea blends. One of these is a green tea with lemon called ‘Hot Summer’, another combines apple with dried flowers, and yet another blend, called the ‘Favourite Tea’ uses tropical fruits. Not so shabby for a coffee drinking nation!

Being in a more conventional mood (and in need of a little caffeine boost!), I opted against the various green and fruity blends for a classic cup of Earl Grey. Their loose tea is served in a sachet, which might disappoint some of you hard-core loose tea devotees (devoteas?), and this was the case for most of the cafés I stopped into. However, considering that we are talking about standard cafés (as opposed to specialty tea cafés) in a nation of coffee drinkers, I am not inclined to fault them too much for this. The Earl Grey blend was a good one— light and fragrant rather than strong, which suited me perfectly. And accompanied by a ‘Kastanjen bun’ full of almond paste (a twist on the classic Swedish cinnamon bun), it made for a delicious afternoon cuppa.

My Stockholm adventures were full of pleasant surprises, and the abundance of good quality, loose leaf teas certainly ranks high on that list; travelling tea drinkers can rest assured that they will not be without options if they choose to stop by Stockholm.

See more of Elise Nuding’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Copenhagen is a wonderful, wonderful town (or so Danny Kaye tells us in the song from the 1952 film Hans Christian Andersen). But song lyrics aside, it really does have some wonderful things to see and explore — tea, rather unexpectedly, being one of them. Although the Danes are really coffee drinkers, I managed to find a spot or two to enjoy some tea and was not at all disappointed.

The China Tea Sampler will help you get that Danish tea experience! (ETS image)

The China Tea Sampler will help you get that Danish tea experience! (ETS image)

Although there are many nice cafes around town, if you want to be treated to a tea-for-tea-lovers experience, then A.C. Perch’s Tearoom is certainly a good place to start. The tea room adjoins A.C. Perch’s Tea Merchants, a specialty tea shop that exclusively sells tea — quite a number of teas, too! The interior of the shop is almost entirely original from shop’s nineteenth-century days. The loose tea is stored in canisters that gleam out of a low-lit interior, lining the walls from floor to ceiling. The enticing aromas from all of the delicious looking teas was enough to tempt me into the adjacent tearoom, where they serve tea and a variety of sweet and savoury goodies to accompany a nice cuppa (admittedly, it did not take much to persuade me, especially on a chilly April day). Since I stopped in during the morning, I was able to get a table easily, but I have since heard that if you want to stop by in the afternoon, reservations are advised — it seems to be regarded as the place to go!

Much of what A.C. Perch’s Tearoom serves falls into the category of the English-style High Tea experience—the menu features tea served with scones (with cream and jam, of course) and/or finger sandwiches, as well as a variety of other cakes, if they are more to your liking. However, this is the content of the menu combinations, and they also serve over 150 varieties of loose tea (this is the number they claim to serve— I did not count them!), presumably the same teas that I had just come across in the adjoining shop.

I was definitely spoiled for choice— a good problem, perhaps, but a problem nonetheless. I am currently on a bit of a green tea kick, and ended up choosing between a classic Chun Mee green tea, and a more unusual Green Darjeeling. Although I was tempted to try out the Green Darjeeling, due to its less common appearance on tea menus, in the end I followed my instincts and opted for the Chun Mee. This is typically a stronger green tea, which I felt I needed after several hours of walking around in chilly, damp weather. As is typical of Chun Mee, the tea had a slightly pungent taste, and re-steeped excellently.

All in all, stopping into A.C. Perch’s Tearoom was a wonderful experience, as the excellent range of teas was matched by a clear appreciation for tea and only tea (as they state quite emphatically, A.C. Perch’s does NOT serve coffee!), and the servers were clearly knowledgeable about their teas, and tea culture in general. The tearoom itself is also a beautiful spot, making an already lovely tea experience even more so. If you happen to be in Copenhagen, I would certainly recommend stopping in.

See more of Elise Nuding’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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© Online Stores, LLC, and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, LLC., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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