Sencha Kyoto Cherry Rose Festival Green Tea

Sencha Kyoto Cherry Rose Festival Green Tea

Roses are not only beautiful to look at, they also smell, and taste, wonderful. Rose is often used in teas and tisanes, adding both beauty to the dry leaf as well as a unique flavor to its cup.

Rose in Tea and Tisane Blends
Try adding dried rose petals or rosebuds to a tea or tisane blend. In my experience, rose does not mesh well with grassy green teas, but adds a lovely sweetness to black teas, bao zhong (pouching) oolong teas, and new-style white teas such as white peony. Rose also blends well with vanilla, anise and chocolate flavors. Incidentally, a rose-flavored black tea is wonderful on ice.

Rose Tisane
It is also possible to simply infuse rose petals or buds into a simple, refined tisane. I prefer to work with dried rosebuds, which are easy to prepare: I add six rosebuds to a 1-cup glass teapot and add hot 195F water. I steep the tisane for 2 minutes, for a lovely nighttime drink. You can also make an iced tisane by doubling the amount of rosebuds and pouring the infusion over ice.

Cautions
Some people are allergic to rose, and should avoid rose teas and tisanes. Be careful not to use too much petal or too many rosebuds, as this can result in a soapy, disagreeable flavor.

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