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July has arrived! It may seem like the past few months have been flying by, but we’re here to give you a little bit of tea encouragement. The teas listed below offer special pricing that will last all month long (no code needed.)

tolstb_egrreg-25p_earl-grey

(c) English Tea Store – Earl Grey Teabags

The first tea is our Regular Earl Grey Tea in Fine Loose Leaf or Teabags. The Earl Grey Tea blend from English Tea Store is a blend of Ceylon and Indian teas. The tea receives its unusual and unique flavor from oil of Bergamot – which is a small acidic orange. The Bergamot orange is a cross between the sweet or pear lemon (Citrus Limetta) and the Seville or sour orange (Citrus Aurantium). The sour orange is native to Southern Vietnam. The Earl Grey Fine Loose Tea is available in 4 different sizes: 4 ounces, 8 ounces, 15 ounces, or 80 ounces. The Earl Grey Teabags are available in a 25 pouch, 25 tin, 50 pouch, 100 bulk, or 500 bulk.

Curious about the benefits of drinking Earl Grey Tea?

  • Good for your teeth – That’s right! Tea contains very high levels of catechin, which is an antioxidant that fights oral infection. Flouride is a naturally occurring component in Earl Grey.
  • Promotes good digestion – Earl Grey can aid and relieve painful digestion, colic, and nausea.
  • Fights anxiety and depression – Unfortunately, in today’s world many people suffer from anxiety, depression, or both. Maybe you’re looking for other routes instead of medicine? The Bergamot in Earl Grey has a calming effect and has natural aromatherapy qualities.
  • Weight loss – Like most teas citrus teas, Earl Grey an induce weight loss. It is thought that calories are broken down into food for your muscles or released through the metabolic process. Try adding some extra citrus like lemon!
  • Hydration (It’s Key!) – Hydration is so important for your body…and it’s not just because tea is made with water. Earl Grey has a high potassium content so it keeps your fluids in check.
TOLSLL_DRJMIM_-Mim-Estate-tea-loose-leaf

(c) English Tea Store – Mim Estate Loose Leaf

Moving on to our next July tea – Mim Estate in Loose Leaf. The Mim Estate blend from the English Tea Store has a distinctive “Muscatel” character with a hint of currant. This tea is a 2nd flush Darjeeling and comes from the Mim Estate in Northern India. The genus of the Darjeeling tea bush is the Chinese Jat, which gives it the distinctive muscatel character. The fragrance and taste is a complex bouquet that travels right out of the cup. Some may describe the taste as nutty, black currant, or muscat grape-like.

The final tea of the month is actually multiple teas in a sampler (What more could you ask for?!) – The Fruit Kick – Loose Leaf Sampler. This is great if you’re looking to try something new and adventure out of your safe zone. Each sampler pack comes with 1 ounce of each of our favorite fruit flavored loose leaf teas: Apple Spice Black Tea, Blackcurrant Black Tea, Pomegranate Lemon Black Tea, Wild Blueberry Organic Tea, and Florida Orange Rooibos Tea. We recommend brewing in water, that has been brought to a boil, for 3-5 minutes.

Okay – I think we’ve given you a lot to think about. Tell us your favorite flavored tea!

If you know me, one of my favorite brands of tea to brew is PG Tips. It is usually my go-to tea for whenever I feel like I need a good pick-me-up or something to warm me up in the cold days of winter. It was one of the first British teas I tasted before I really began to dive into British food and culture and I introduced it to my young nephew, keeping the love for PG Tips well into the next generation.

teatpgt1000031917_-00_pg-tips-juicy-raspberry-green-tea-bags-20-count teatpgt1000032454_-00_pg-tips-red-bush-vanilla-herbal_1While plain black tea is what they started with, PG tips recently began to expand their tea line from beyond the standard black tea. While there is loose leaf and decaf, PG Tips has ventured into the world of green, herbal, and fruit teas. Five varieties of green tea have been produced by PG, Pure Green, Juicy Raspberry, Fragrant Jasmine, Vibrant Mandarin Orange, and Zesty Lemon. Each box of green tea has 20 bags and is a fine blend from Indonesia and Kenya. All but the Pure Green are infused with a floral or fruity flavor.

Perhaps you fancy a more lighter taste and less caffeine? That’s where the herbal teas come in. Delicate Camomile, Refreshing Peppermint, Smooth Redbush and Vanilla, and Aromatic Spices and Mint are all here to soothe you. Camomile is infused with delicate flowers, Peppermint is a clean and refreshing minty goodness, Redbush and Vanilla is a mixture of South African Rooibos, vanilla flavor, hibiscus flowers, and cranberry, and finally Spices and Mint is a combination of familiar spices like cinnamon, mint, and a bit of orange.

Still prefer black tea? There are some new varieties that PG tips has in store such as the Strong One and the Fresh One. The Strong One has a bright red color when brewed, a malty aroma, and a bold tea character. This tea is blended from teas grown in Kenya and other African nations. The Fresh One is also red when brewed, and this tea is a Breakfast Blend plus English Breakfast, all blended from tea grown in Kenya.

It is hard to choose from all these varieties! I like to expand my horizons and try new tea but if you’re a tea lover like myself, you might have a large cupboard full of tea! Have you tried any of these flavors? Let us know!

blueberry-sweet-fruitOne thing I love the smell of in the morning, is blueberries. Blueberry muffins, blueberry pancakes, and now blueberry tea. Recently I tried out the English Tea Store’s Blueberry Green and it’s one of my new go-to teas – refreshing enough to wake me up but also somewhat calming. Good for a weekend morning where you can relax. I gave this tea to my dad, one of the most wound-up people in the world and HE enjoyed it!

This tea is good either sweetened or unsweetened, hot or iced. The smell is very heavenly and pairs well with breakfast, but of course you can also have it whenever you feel like it. A wonderful tea time drink, it pairs well with a delicious blueberry scone or scone with blueberry jam (I’m going crazy with blueberries here).

1445443_96433729If you’re not much of a blueberry fan as I am, you can always go for plain green tea or even our bolder green tea with ceylonCeylon is a black tea and helps add smoothness. Both teas are very good choices for a relaxing morning or a tea time.

~CD

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Flavored teas don't appeal to us all. (ETS image)

Flavored teas don’t appeal to us all. (ETS image)

Don’t bother looking for a definition of the term “microflavoring” by the way. I tried looking for it, just to be sure, and I didn’t find one. Which is not surprising, given that it’s a term I just recently coined. I don’t expect that it’s going to catch on, but here’s the story of how it came about.

Over the course of my years of drinking tea I came to the conclusion that I no longer liked flavored teas, for the most part, and I never really have liked smoky teas like Lapsang Souchong and the like. More recently, however, I’ve started to come to terms just a bit with the smoky stuff, which is something I discussed in an article a few months back.

There are also a (very) few types of flavored tea that I can drink now and then. One of the more tolerable is peach, which is something I was able to confirm when I had the chance to try some of the English Tea Store’s peach flavored black tea not so long ago. The only drawback to this particular tea is that I found it a little strong for my tastes. Which is also the case with most of the smoky teas I’m still working on coming to terms with. The smokier ones I still don’t even bother with, at least not in their undiluted state.

While I was never too keen on smoky tea there was actually a time when I drank a fair amount of the flavored stuff. My theory is that when I started drinking tea my taste buds weren’t really attuned to the more subtle flavors of the plain teas and thus the flavored ones didn’t seem so overpowering. As the years passed my palate adjusted to unflavored tea and nowadays I find the flavored ones to be too much.

Which is a more roundabout way than usual of getting to the point of what microflavoring is. Which is quite simple actually, as the name suggests. It’s simply a matter of taking a very small amount of a flavored tea – be it smoky or peach or whatever – and adding it to a plain tea just to give it a little bit of a kick. I do this most often with teas that I’m not completely nuts about but which are not lackluster enough to give up on altogether. As for good tea, it doesn’t need any help. But don’t take my word for it.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Time for another tea quiz, all you fellow tea lovers. Let’s see how it goes. This time around it’s all flavored teas (sometimes misnamed as “tea blends”) where you need to identify not the tea itself but the “stuff” added to it.

First, the question in the title can be said several different ways. There’s the joyful way where you just tasted something wonderful and want to know what it is. There’s the way where there’s a tinge of almost horror in your voice as if the flavor leads you to think there’s something most terrible in what you just drank. Then there’s the “I’m allergic to some things so I gotta know what’s in this before drinking” way of asking. And of course, the merely curious and/or polite asking. Whichever you choose, the answer is important. It could surprise you, please you, annoy you, or even make you very worried. Best to ask this question before drinking. Better yet, get to know how things look in the dry tea mixture so you can know whether or not to imbibe. [Note: not everything can be detected visually.]

A.

Tea_Blog_6652 BTC Jasmine EXTRAS - Copy(Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

B.

Tea_Blog_6915 PTT Peach Apple Crisp EXTRAS - Copy(Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

C.

Tea_Blog_5244 JT Summer Sunshine EXTRAS - Copy(Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

D.

Tea_Blog_6982 TJay Corazon de Melon EXTRAS - Copy(Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

E.

Tea_Blog_6387 BTC Trop Mango EXTRAS - Copy(Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

F.

Tea_Blog_6960 TJ The Monk EXTRAS - Copy(Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Answers:

I know that none of you peeked at the answers here before making your own guesses (it’s the honor system) and some of you did not need to guess but knew the answers. See which you got right and give yourself a gold star for each correct answer.

A. Per the vendor, this mix consists of Chinese Chun Mee green tea and jasmine blossoms.

B. An unspecified black tea with plenty of dried peach and apple bits plus dried rose petals.

C. An Oolong tea flavored with basil, lemon granules, marigold blossoms, and other unspecified flavorings.

D. This is a Chinese oolong with honey melon, guava pieces, barberries, tea flowers and sunflowers (per the vendor’s web site).

E. A fruity tea, based on black Ceylon tea from Sri Lanka and flavored with sunflower petals and large chunks of dried ripe mango.

F. An unspecified black tea with a ton of other stuff added in. The vendor’s web site lists the additions as: cranberry, orange peel, apple, papaya, pineapple, apricot, almond, rose hips, cinnamon, rose petals, cornflowers, and flavoring. Tea takes a real backseat with the majority of the content being the fruits and other stuff.

Now it’s time to pick one, steep it up, and enjoy!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The distinction was made some time ago by another writer on this blog between a tea blend and a flavored tea. The former was all tea, that is, leaves from the Camellia Sinensis bush, and the latter was tea with “stuff” added such as fruits, flowers, spices, oils, etc. Now, I am going to push that concept one step further, more as a mental exercise and to get your brain cells firing as you consider the whole possibility of yet another tea term.

Bohemian Raspberry – the tea flavor is enhanced with natural raspberry. (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Bohemian Raspberry – the tea flavor is enhanced with natural raspberry. (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Something started bugging me about calling teas with stuff added “flavored teas.” It seems to imply that the tea has no flavor on its own, which is far from the truth, at least for the better teas. At some point during our tastings of various tea samples received from vendors both here in the U.S. and abroad, hubby and I started calling these teas “enhanced” instead of “flavored.” It seems more accurate to us.

Consider the sense of smell here (closely aligned with the sense of taste). A good tea master can bring out all kinds of aromas from the leaves during processing. Sugars in the leaves, for example, can be heated enough to caramelize them. You will miss this if caramel is actually added to those leaves. Of course, you can start with a rather conventional black tea that has not been processed by a tea master so that the natural flavors have been brought out, and then add in the caramel flavoring that is missing. Thus, the “enhanced” tea, having a flavor added to it that should have been there naturally. We prefer to capture the aromas of the tea leaves that a good tea master can bring out during processing.

In other examples, the stuff added doesn’t necessarily make up for bad processing but instead is meant to add flavors and aromas to the tea leaves’ flavors and aromas. This is more close to the concept of “enhancing” the tea, it seems. The cinnamon is added to work with the malty character of a tea produced from the Camellia Sinensis assamica varietal, grown in a variety of locations in the world.

Some fragrances are so overpowering that you haven’t a chance of smelling the tea leaves. One of the best known is jasmine. I find it so strong that even a tea pouch that is supposed to be airtight will emit that floral fragrance through to my nose. Cinnamon is another that can really overpower, and so does oil of bergamot (used to make Earl Grey teas).

Of course, another option might be to call these “smothered” teas where the flavor of the tea gets drowned out by the cinnamon, oil of bergamot, cloves, nutmeg, dried apple bits, cornflower petals, and whatever else gets tossed into the mix.

Just some thoughts here. Yours welcome, too!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Buckingham Palace Garden Party Loose Leaf Tea - specially blended by experts (ETS image)

Buckingham Palace Garden Party Loose Leaf Tea – specially blended by experts (ETS image)

[Editor’s note: the following article uses the term “blend” to refer to both blended and flavored teas, which are actually two very different things as shown in this other article on our blog.]

There are a lot of tea vendors out there who offer a blend-your-own-tea option, but how useful is this, really?

Customisation is in at the moment, with organisations and companies of all sizes trying to attract the individual consumer by offering them exactly what they want and tailoring the product specifically to their needs. But is expanding this penchant for customisation to tea taking it one step too far?

Typically, a shop that offers a blend-your-own-tea option will offer different choices for the base of your tea or herbal infusion (black, white, green, rooibos, etc.) This  base is then combined with other teas or flavours, such as dried fruits and herbs, to produce your very own blend. But is the average consumer really going to be able to put together a tea they will like? After all, tea blending, just like any specialty skill, is often considered to be an art, with tea blends carefully crafted to bring out the best of the flavours on offer. Expert tea blenders are experts for a reason—surely their knowledge of tea exceeds that of the everyday tea shopper, no matter how much of a tea connoisseur they might be?

But what happens when a tea that you’re hankering for is not on offer? What if you have always wondered what this or that tea would taste like with a particular flavour? In these situations blend-your-own-tea can be a great option, but you still need to make sure that you know what you want. Otherwise, it is all too easy to end up with a tea that sounds great, smells great, but might not taste all that great.

Blending your own tea works best when you have as much information as possible, and as such is not something I’d recommend for those who are only just getting into tea (unless, of course, you’re up for experimenting and don’t mind potentially spending a lot of money on teas you don’t like). If there is a tea you really enjoy but wished it had just a little more of this or a little less of that then blend-your-own-tea could be the answer to your tea dilemmas. To give a specific example, if you enjoy Lady Londonderry tea but wished it didn’t have such a floral tone, you could try blending a black tea with strawberry and lemon to suit your taste. If you have researched which black tea is typically used as a base and the amounts of each flavour that tends to be used in Lady Londonderry, then chances are you’ll create a blend you’ll enjoy.

Of course, there is still the risk that you might not end up liking the tea. But then this is always going to be the case when you are trying a new tea, whether or not you have blended it yourself. So whilst blend-your-own-tea options may not always be as good an idea as they seem, they definitely give tea lovers the option to craft a tea to suit their taste.

See more of Elise Nuding’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

A ton of “stuff” that smothers the tea taste. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

A ton of “stuff” that smothers the tea taste. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

My taste for flavored teas has for the most part faded like a cheap rug in the sunlight. The reason is pretty simple but takes a bit of explaining and some examples.

Once upon a time, Earl Grey was my favorite tea. I was gaga over it. Wouldn’t drink anything else. Then, I started branching out into other flavored teas. A spiced tea that folks in the U.S. call “chai” but that is more correctly called “masala chai” or “spiced tea” was the next one to grab my interest. It all started at an Indian restaurant. My love for curries, chutneys, and other Indian foods is by now well-known to everyone around me. A nice cup of masala chai seemed a natural beverage to have, therefore, with that spicy lamb vindaloo. Normally, I’d have a mango lassie, but it was a chilly day, so hot tea sounded better anyway.

From these humble beginnings, I branched out into trying various flavored teas. Some of this was due to samples that were offered and that I accepted. Hey, why not? Some of the flavors included:

  • Flowers — Orange Blossom White Tea, Lavender Butterfly Green Tea, Emerald Sun Flowering Green Tea with Chrysanthemum
  • Fruits — Cranberry Black Tea, Peach Apple Crisp, Apricot Green Tea, Berry Medley, Blackcurrant Black Tea, Japanese Sencha Kyoto Cherry Tea, Kyoho Grape Oolong, Lemon Mango Black Tea, Lychee Congou Black Tea, Monk’s Blend Black Tea, Citron Green Tea, Bohemian Raspberry Green Tea, Candy Apple Black Tea, Passionfruit Oolong, Pomegranate Green Tea, Orange Spice Black Tea, Strawberry Fields Black Tea, Tropical Tangerine White Tea
  • Baked goods — Pumpkin Spice (4 versions), Auntie’s Pumpkin Pie, Gingerbread Black Tea
  • Vegetables — Artichoke Green Tea, White Cucumber Tea, Sweet Potato Black Tea
  • Jasmines — Jasmine Ancient Beauty, All That Jazz-mine, Jasmine Bloom Flowering Tea, Jasmine Dragon Pearl, Jasmine Green Tea, Dragon Phoenix Jasmine Green Tea
  • Spices — Masala Chai, Ginger Chai, Bombay Chai, Cardamom Chai, India Spice Chai in a K-Cup, Green Chai, Mountain High Chai, Night of the Iguana Chocolate Chai, Saffron Chai, Holiday Spice Black Tea, Vanilla Chai
  • Earl Grey (4 versions) and variations — Earl Grey Citrus Tea, Earl Grey Cream Metropolitan Blend, Earl Grey Lavender Black Tea, British Earl Grey White Tea, Crazy Earl, Buckingham Palace Garden Party Black Tea
  • Vanilla, Chocolate, Mint, etc. — Bossa Nova Oolong, Vanilla Black Tea, Madagascar Vanilla Black Tea, Vanilla Almond Oolong, Candy Cane Black Tea, Chocolate Mint Tea, French ChocoLatté Green Tea, Scottish Caramel Toffee Pu-erh
  • Nuts — Hazelnut Black Tea, Chestnut Black Tea
  • Ones with Strange Names — I’m a Survivor, The Armstrong, The Carter, The Gillespie, The Horne, The Krall, The Monk, The Vaughan, City in a Garden, Angel’s Dream, Butter Baroness, Summer Sunrise, Sock It To Me, The Road to Hana, Lover’s Lane, Winter Wonderland, Indian Summer, Cherry Oh Baby, Corazon de Melon

They all had one thing in common: they smothered the taste of the tea. Hubby and I began to wonder why we were even bothering with the tea part. Best to just have some straight infusions of whatever the flavorings were that had been added to those teas. This became increasingly important as soon as we tasted really good teas.

Golden Bi Luo Chun and Ti Kuan Yin Iron Goddess were the first teas to show us what we were missing under all those flavors. Subtleties and nuances that changed with each infusion or even as the temperature of the liquid changed. Ever since, we have been on an exploratory journey, tastebud-wise, to find out more. Every now and then we have a flavored tea, but we quickly return to the straight kind. Ah!

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Looking for that heavenly taste in a teacup? I may have just found it: Angel’s Dream Tea. It’s a flavored tea that evokes thoughts of pancakes and fruit sundaes all at the same time.

Angel's Dream — a flavored tea that still lets the tea taste come through!

Angel’s Dream — a flavored tea that still lets the tea taste come through!

Flavoring and scenting teas has been a tradition for centuries, in fact, about as long as tea has been consumed by humans. Some flavored/scented teas are classics, that is, they have been around awhile — such teas as Jasmine Greens and Lapsang Souchong, plus Earl Grey and masala chai. Coming up with a new flavoring combos is the challenge, therefore, to vendors trying to compete in an increasingly crowded marketplace. Lots of vendors are working on new flavorings. You can see their latest results touted on Twitter and Facebook.

Angel’s Dream is a flavored tea that doesn’t drown out the tea taste with the flavorings. The key seems to be the tea “base” — they start with quality teas that can hold their own through whatever gets added to them. Teas from Sri Lanka (Ceylon), Formosa(Taiwan), and Assam(India) are great on their own. In fact, they are some of our favorites, both individually and in blends. The Ceylon and Assam teas can get a bit bitter or astringent on their own, so many folks like hubby and me tend to add a bit of sweetener and even some milk to them. But combined with the Formosa tea and with the added flavors of maple and wild blackberry, that edginess is gone.

The tea steeps up the way you would most black teas: boiling water and 3 to 5 minutes. Hubby and I steeped it for only 3 minutes, and the liquid and flavor came through fairly strong. We did a second steep for 5 minutes from the same leaves and had a result that was almost as strong as the first but with a more maple-ish flavor. We have found this to be typical of flavored teas. Keep the first steep a bit short. You will still get strong flavor yet have enough left over for a flavorful second steep, and extend that second steep time a bit.

Like most Assam and Ceylon teas, a bit of milk can be a nice touch. Even this flavored version can take some milk in it. Hubby and I tried it that way and found it was very satisfying and dessert-like, like others we have tried.

A flavored tea that can also be enjoyed with milk, if you prefer.

A flavored tea that can also be enjoyed with milk, if you prefer.

One final note here: when trying a tea, take a look at the tea leaves after steeping, for they can tell you a lot. In this case, the leaves tell you that this is a broken leaf tea and shows the mix of Taiwanese (Formosan) tea with the others. A good sign!

The leaves after steeping tell the story of quality!

The leaves after steeping tell the story of quality!

See also:
Drinkable Desserts (Teas as Good as Dessert)

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

In response to my article “Teas with Something Extra,” a friend on either Twitter or Facebook (I can’t remember which) commented, “Hey, if you’re gonna add ‘stuff’ to your tea, why not throw in the kitchen sink?” So very true. Once you’ve loaded down a tea with so many pieces of fruit, or flower petals, or spices, your chances of tasting the tea are virtually nil. The Tea Association of Canada even recommended adding carbonated lemon-lime drink to your iced tea for some extra kick. While these things don’t suit my taste, I know there are some folks for whom these additions to their tea are a definite plus.

Some flavored teas have so much “stuff” in them!

Some flavored teas have so much “stuff” in them!

Some people just plain don’t like the taste of tea yet drink it, trying to get the health benefits it is said to have and/or avoiding resorting to drinking things like colas (one tea vendor actually has a cola-flavored tea). They relish teas that are mainly fruit-flavored (lemon, strawberry, and blueberry are quite popular) or floral-flavored (jasmine and rose petals/buds being the most common). They also go for spiced teas (usually made with cinnamon, coriander, ginger, cardamom, and black pepper), teas with various herbs added (chamomile, hibiscus, and mint are rather popular), and teas flavored with oils (Earl Grey being the most common and containing oil of bergamot, vanilla is another one that is trendy).

Some of these flavored teas tend to go with the seasons. Pumpkin Spice Black Tea tends to be most popular in Autumn here in the U.S. — probably due to our Thanksgiving Holiday in late November but also since pumpkins are harvested in September and October. In Summer, teas flavored with lemon and mint are quite popular for their cooling and refreshing qualities. Fruits like raspberry and blueberry also sell well, especially in those bottled teas that are usually served chilled.

There are tea vendors, large and small, that work hard to come up with new combinations and convince you of how great they taste. They give their mixtures names that are memorable, descriptive, and sometimes downright silly (which can help make them memorable). So far as I know, though, know has a tea concoction named “Everything but the Kitchen Sink.” My guess is there’ll be one soon.

As for those of us who like our tea tasting like tea, there are a growing number of tea vendors devoted to just that. They source the finest teas from tea gardens near and wide because they know that some of us are not fond of all that “stuff” getting between us and our tea.

Isn’t variety wonderful?

See also:
Men’s Names and Tea
Tea Name Circus
A Bouquet in Your Teapot, Pt. I — Flowers in Your Tea
A Bouquet in Your Teapot, Pt. II — Herbals Made from Flowers
A Bouquet in Your Teapot, Pt. III — Teas with Floral Aroma and Flavor
All Flavored Teas Are Not Created Equal  

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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© Online Stores, LLC, and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, LLC., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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