You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Herbal’ tag.

Nile Delta Camomile (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Nile Delta Camomile (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

You may not know this, but tea is a favorite beverage of the man in the moon. Just kidding. There is no man in the moon. No matter. Steep a pot of tea and raise a teacup toast to our nearest neighbor in that celestial vastness.

“Full moon” is one of those expressions that grew out of a time when mankind didn’t really know what that circle in the sky was. Science has revealed to us what it really is — an actual sphere about one-fourth the size of Earth and held in a gravitational orbit around us. The landing of a team of astronauts traveling there and Neil Armstrong setting the first human footprint there forever confirmed that fact.

The phases of the moon (full, half, quarter, crescent, new) are based on our view of that moon from here. When the moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, the sunlight reflects off of it to us, and we see a full circle. As the moon continues its orbit, we see less and less of that circle until we see none (when the moon is on the same side of Earth that the Sun is but not directly aligned or there would be an eclipse).

That “full moon” with that full circle of light reflecting down on us is said to be the cause of many things: lunacy (named after the Latin word for the moon), lycanthropy (where that full moon brings out the inner beast), sleeplessness (with that light keeping you awake), and of course love! There is a tea for each. Really.

Lunacy

You can either go with something soothing to take away the madness or with something totally mad so that your mild madness won’t seem mad by comparison. Sort of like how beautiful women hang out with ugly women so they (the beautiful women) will look more beautiful (or so I’ve heard).

  • A soothing infusion of chamomile is a good alternative here. Egyptian chamomile is particularly fine and has a sweeter flavor than others, one that needs only a touch of honey to expand that sweetness.
  • A mad tea, however, is a rather tricky matter. It could be something with wild flavors added or just a really strong-tasting tea. Wild Blueberry Black Tea is a good option here. Blueberries pack a great deal of sweet, tangy flavor, and are enjoyed by many. This delicious organic black tea delivers an intoxicating aroma and sweet blueberry flavor that’s sure to be delicious hot or iced, especially when a pinch of sweetener is added. Though the blueberry is one of the world’s smaller fruits, it certainly doesn’t taste like it!

Lycanthropy (Beastliness)

The werewolf legend has lasted hundreds of years and been portrayed in movies countless times. An important part of that legend is the full moon bringing that beast to life. It’s also quite an allegory

  • Blood Orange Flavored Black Tea may sound like it’s more appropriate for vampires, but werewolves are pretty bloodthirsty, too. So indulge. And don’t worry. There’s no real blood in it. This is a quality high grown Ceylon tea with natural Blood Orange and other flavorings. Blood Oranges are native to Sicily in south Italy, and are sweeter and juicier than a regular orange, and of course, the flesh is of a deep red color. Lon Chaney, Jr., would have liked this one himself.

Sleeplessness

It can be tricky to sleep with that bright moonlight beaming down. And again you have two choices: try to sleep or give in and have a nice moonlight tea party.

  • To help you sleep, go for
  • To enjoy at that moonlight tea party, have some Angels Dream Tea. The natural flavors of Maple and Wild Blackberry enhance the excellent teas selected from the tea world’s finest regions -Sri Lanka, Formosa and Assam (India).

Love

“By the light of the silvery moon, I want to spoon, to my honey I’ll croon love’s tune, Honeymoon keep a-shining in June, Your silvery beams will bring love dreams, we’ll be cuddling soon, By the silvery moon.” Yes, indeed, that song and a variety of movies, books, songs, paintings, etc., show the amorous effect that moon has on us humans. Teas can inspire such passions, too. A Tea Lovers Little Tea Pot Gift Set will pull together a lovely moonlight love affair! From the white gloss basket, rose-colored teapot and cup/saucer set, to the cookies, cake, teas, and other treats, you’ll be well-stocked and well-sated, as will your true love be!

Bottom Line

Keep an eye out for that next full moon and be sure to have those teas and treats handy, not matter what effects you experience!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Advertisements
Blue Eyes Herbal "Tea" (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

Blue Eyes Herbal “Tea” (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

In tea-related discussion forums and groups, we keep encountering the discussion of whether the definition of the word “tea” should be limited to the varieties of the Camellia Sinensis plant or whether it is ok to call anything tea that will infuse in (hot?) water, as is quite common use in the English language. Never, though, will you encounter a point where this dispute is resolved, as important as it seems to be for many pure tea lovers to emphasize the difference and value it by a distinct linguistic usage of terms, reserving “tea” for the Camellia Sinensis plant and its derivate products. Considered equally crucial is the right to use the term “tea” for their herbs and fruit infusions by advocates of a language use that will call a herbal infusion a herbal tea and a fruit infusion a fruit tea, up to the point, where a 100% artificial dry granule product that will produce a sweet and citrus-like taste when stirred in cold water, can be called a lemon tea.

Rather an advocate of the “only tea is tea” claims myself, I found it quite interesting to discover that the described terminological confusion about the term “tea” is by no means restricted to the English language! In Germany, the German word “Tee” (tea) is used exactly the same way as it is in English, once for the actual tea plant, once for its derivate products, and also for “Kräutertee” (herbal tea), “Früchtetee” (fruit tea), “Gesundheitstee” (health tea), and so on. I checked on my third language, which is Thai, with similar results: while “chaa” in Thai means tea referring to Camellia Sinensis, “chaa dtôn-grà-jíap” literally translates to “roselle tea”, etc. Now, I had become really curious: what about the cradle of tea, China, where the use of tea (Camellia Sinensis) as a beverage is nearly as old as the oldest written Chinese language? It’s the end of the world as we know it: with “chá” (茶) being “tea” in Chinese, the Chinese online dictionaries also return 草药茶 (cǎoyàochá) for “herbal tea”, or  洋甘菊茶 (yánggān júchá) for “chamomile tea.”

Now, did Western languages adopt the double usage of the word tea from the Chinese? Or has the Chinese language adopted the confusing language usage to facilitate the herbs trade with European countries at some point in the old times? And is the issue consistent over other European languages, too? It will need a linguistic historian to tell about the first, but the answer to the second question is a clear No: in French, they call a herbal “tea” a “tisane” or “infusion”, in Spanish  an “infusión de hierbas”, and in Italian a “tisana” or “infuso di herbe”, while “real tea” (Camellia Sinensis) will be “thé”, “”, and “” in these 3 languages. A closer study of the roots of European languages reveals that the Balto-Slawo Germanic root of European languages produced languages, such as English and German, where “tea” is used alternatively for Camellia Sinensis and herbal/fruit tisanes, while the kelto-italo-tocharic language root produced languages, such as French, Spanish, and Italian, that clearly distinguish between the two.

None of this will do anything to resolve or arbitrate the dispute about what may be called tea and what not, but it might give those, who really care, some points from where to start their relevant research under a more linguistic-historical perspective, basically pursuing the question “Where and when has the mistake been made for the first time?”

See more of  Thomas Kasper’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Technically a tisane, the infusion made from Sideritis syriaca is the Greek cultural equivalent of English black tea with a dash of milk; when you say “tea” in Greece, this is what you are referring to. I recently discovered this culturally specific infusion after getting into a discussion about tea with some Greek friends of mine. I have yet to try some (it is hard to find and expensive outside of Greece), but I was intrigued enough to do a bit of research into this herbal infusion.

ETS Herbals (Photo source: screen capture from site)

ETS Herbals (Photo source: screen capture from site)

Sideritis syriaca is a Mediterranean flowering plant also known as ironwort, and the “tea” it produces is often called mountain tea, or shepherd’s tea. This refers to the fact that the plant is found at high, rocky elevations (over 1,000 metres, or 3,200 feet) and as such was used for infusions by shepherds while they were tending their sheep. Or so it is said. But whatever its original uses, it has been around for a while, as it is mentioned in the writings of ancient Greek physicians and botanists.

The preparation of the beverage is similar to that of many herbal infusions: the dried leaves, flowers, and stems of the plant are steeped in boiling water for up to ten minutes, and then strained out. Often, the infusion is served with honey to sweeten it up. Sideritis syriaca is said to have a wide range of health benefits, including for the digestive system and immune system. This means it is often drunk to help alleviate colds, flus, and other nasty viruses of the sort that are going around at this time of year.

So, if you are headed to Greece any time in the near future (or, as in my case, have friends who will be going there soon), look for this tisane. It is the quintessential Greek “tea” experience, and not being a well-known cultural export, it is something new and different to try out. I am certainly looking forward to trying it for myself soon!

See more of Elise Nuding’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

I like to enjoy produce when it is in season. As October advances, my fridge becomes filled with the likes of winter squash, radishes, and carrots. This bodes well for delicious soups and stews, but what does it mean for tea? Turnip and radish tea is not exactly on my top five list (actually, it’s not on any list), but nevertheless there are ways to enjoy seasonal produce in your tea times. I say tea times, but I in fact mean herbal infusion times — Camellia Sinensis, the tea leaf, is probably not going to turn up in your seasonal produce box, and so technically these brews are herbal infusions, not teas.

Blue Eyes Herbal (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

Blue Eyes Herbal (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

The blends listed below are ideas for some do-it-yourself herbal infusions using produce currently in season. Of course, what is in season will vary depending on where in the world you are, but if you are anywhere in the Northern Hemisphere that enjoys seasonal weather, hopefully you will find some ideas here that reflect what you have access to.

This earlier article dealt with how to make the infusions, but just as a recap, the basic idea for DIY infusions is this:

  • Place 20-30 ounces of water in a pot and bring to a boil.
  • Add the ingredients, cover, and simmer for fifteen minutes on a low-medium heat.
  • Leave the pot to cool for a few minutes.
  • Then serve your herbal infusion into a mug or teapot, adding honey to taste.

N.B. The amount of ingredients you add is variable. The amounts and ratios you use will reflect how strong, or mild, you like each infusion, and what balance of flavours you prefer.

1 Lemon/Orange and Ginger:

Citrus fruits, including oranges and lemons, usually show up during autumn. I prefer this blend with lemon, but they do go out of season as autumn rolls on. If you have any still trickling in, combining them with ginger gives an infusion that is tasty, and might also help you fend off those nasty coughs and colds that go around at this time of year.

Slice up the ginger root and the fruit (leaving the rinds on is fine) to get fuller flavour. I suggest simmering the ginger for longer, and adding the citrus at the end. This will give you a ginger-heavy infusion with a touch of citrus.

2 Apple Cranberry:

These fruits define autumn for many. Apple pie, apple cider, and cranberry sauce make regular appearances on the table, so why not include them in your tea? The cranberries will make your tea slightly tangy, perhaps even a little sour, so you might want to add some honey before serving.  If you do not have access to fresh fruit, dried apples and cranberries will also produce a tasty brew.

3 Apple Cinnamon:

Another favourite flavour combination for fall. Simmer the apples first, and then add a cinnamon stick to the pot. If you can get your hands on a cinnamon stick rather than ground cinnamon, you will get a much better flavour. You can always add the ground cinnamon as a dusting to top it off!

4 Orange and Spice:

Combine orange slices with fall spices such as cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, or nutmeg. Again, use whole versions of the spice (whole cloves, cinnamon sticks, etc.) rather than ground, as they will make for a tastier cup.

5 Vanilla Almond:

This may not use seasonal produce, as such, but it is a great herbal infusion to brew up fresh on a cold day. Slice up or crush the almonds to maximise their flavour. You will need quite a few, or could even add some almond essence if you want a strong almond flavour. For the vanilla, you can use vanilla essence or whole vanilla pods, but if you use essence, use it sparingly, as a little goes a long way! A few drops should be adequate for 20-30 ounces of water. To make it into more of a dessert infusion, add honey—either into the pot, or when you serve it.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Herbal infusions are teas, too. Now, I’m probably going to upset a lot of tea lovers for making this bold statement and in fact, if you’d have said “herbal infusions are teas” to me a couple of months ago, I’d have found it difficult to agree with you. Why this sudden change of heart you may ask? Well, it was all down to my mum visiting me in Australia.

One day she asked me what I was working on during the week, and so I explained that I had a Tea Appreciation class coming up and was just updating my slides on the difference between tea and herbal infusions. She cocked her head to one side and tried to repeat “herbal infusions” in English; stopped mid-sentence and said “herbal-what”? I proceeded to explain that tea is a beverage derived from the Camellia Sinensis bush and that anything else from which a beverage is derived is a herbal infusion. Mum continued to look at me in a confused manner and so I carried on.

Nile Delta Camomile

Nile Delta Camomile

Me: “You know, like peppermint, camomile, lavender? These are all herbal infusions.”
Mum: “But they’re all tea.”
Me: “Huh?” (not very eloquent I know but it was now my turn to be confused).
Mum: “We Chinese call any herb, flower or shrub; if a beverage is derived from it, it’s called a tea.”

It was my turn to cock my head and, as I took a momentary trip down memory lane and thought back to my childhood, I realised that when I was given a pure jasmine flower “tea,” Momordica Fruit “tea” or when I made a chrysanthemum “tea,” you know what? My mother was right – we would refer to these beverages in Cantonese as “tea.” It was an amazing revelation, and I laughed as I nodded and reluctantly had to agree with mum. So you see, after years of insisting there is a difference between real tea and herbal “tea,” I might have to change my mindset and accept that herbal infusions are teas, too, because mothers are always right, aren’t they?

On to my Tea Appreciation Class and I reflected on what mum had said and decided to continue to make the distinction between tea and herbal infusions. The reason being is because teas, which come from the Camellia Sinensis bush all have very similar health benefits whereas each and every one of the herbal infusions will have their own unique health properties. Rooibos, for example, is renown for its antioxidant content, Hibiscus is packed with Vitamin C and is said to help lower cholesterol, whilst Camomile is reputed for its sleep-aiding properties. I did end the class with my conversation with mum, though, whilst we all shared a laugh and a cup of tea together.

A few days later, I translated my conversation with mum to my husband, whose initial response was what about coffee? I haven’t quite got round to asking mum about that yet.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Godiva Roche Rooibos

Godiva Roche Rooibos

Name: Godiva Roche Rooibos

Brand: English Tea Store

Type: Herbal Tisane, Rooibos

Form: Loose leaf

Review: Looking for a chocolate rooibos? Godiva Roche Rooibos is a good one. Made from rooibos, cacao beans and peels, vanilla and what appears to be a handful of calandula petals, this is certainly a rich treat for chocolate fans.

Chocolate and rooibos actually go together quite well: The sweetness of the chocolate meshes with the earthy characteristics of the rooibos nicely, creating a soothing, yet also elegant drink. The English Tea Store was wise to add a strong dose of vanilla to this brew, as vanilla enhances the sweetness of chocolate and is a natural pairing with rooibos.

One Warning: Many people find themselves initially disappointed by chocolate-flavored rooibos because it isn’t as sweet as they expect it to be. Keep in mind that Godiva Roche Rooibos isn’t sweetened, so if you are used to drinking beverages that contain sugar, this tisane may seem somewhat austere at first. That said, I don’t normally use sweetener in my teas or tisanes and I find this rooibos to be sweet enough on its own. If you are hoping to drink something that tastes like a chocolate bar, be prepared to add some sugar or honey to your cup.

Preparation Tips: If you like a very rich chocolate flavor, use 2 tablespoons of dry leaf to 8 ounces of water when preparing Godiva Roche Rooibos and allow to steep for about eight minutes. If you prefer a more subtle cup, reduce the steep time to five minutes and adjust the leaf amount to taste. Add milk and sweetener for a lower-calorie alternative to hot chocolate.

Serving Tips: Drink Godiva Roche Rooibos on its own as a snack or liquid dessert. If you really want to pair it with food, choose plain butter or sugar cookies.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Granny Green Apple Green Tea

Granny Green Apple Green Tea

Apple-flavored teas are enjoyed year round but become especially popular in the Fall, a time in the U.S. when apples are typically harvested. They are also featured in a number of caffeine-free herbal mixes.

Start with Granny Green Apple Green Tea, which blends a luscious green tea with bits of green apple. It’s deliciously refreshing, like biting into a real apple, and the all natural fruity flavor is perfect for any time of day. Each sip will give you that Autumn aura where the heat of Summer fades into cooler days and nights that lead into that time when growing things rest.

Apple Spice Naturally Flavored Black Tea

Apple Spice Naturally Flavored Black Tea

If you prefer a black tea version, try Apple Spice black tea with a flavor that is straight from the orchard blending with the taste of natural, high-grown Ceylon tea from estates at more than 5,500 feet above sea level and no chemical aftertaste. Generally, you would enjoy a tea like this without milk, but you might try a little with milk just to see if it suits you. Either way, you will be transported with each sip to a place of serenity and calm, like when the labors of harvest are ended and before the canning and baking begin.

Go caffeine-free and fruity with Lady Hannah’s Whole Fruit Herbalwhere apple blends with a virtual fruit market for palate-pleasing flavor. Lemon, strawberry, hibiscus, rosehip, pineapple pieces, papaya pieces, brambleberries, strawberry pieces, blackberries, raspberries, and other natural flavors join in the fun. Steep for at least 5 minutes, and preferably 7 minutes, in boiling water to bring out the full flavors of each fruit. Once ready, this hot beverage can be sipped slowly to get the most of all those fruits and let them dance on your tongue. They will remind you of warm tropical nights while at the same time have you longing for that comfy sweater you stored away last Spring.

Lady Hannahs Whole Fruit Herbal

Lady Hannahs Whole Fruit Herbal

Of course, you can also stick with a nice tea to have with an apple-y dessert. Try cinnamon-flavored tea, Darjeeling, Dragonwell, Ceylon, Earl Grey, Yunnan, or Ti Kuan Yin. Enjoy any of these with a slice of apple pie, warmed and topped with a nice slice of slightly melted cheddar cheese or with a scoop of vanilla or even a big dollop of fresh whipped cream.

Gee, I have a sudden hankering to go bake an apple pie. Wait a minute… it will pass… ah, that’s better! I’ll just head to the local bakery now.

Enjoy your apple tea time!

See also:
All Flavored Teas Are Not Created Equal
An Orchard in Your Teapot, Pt. III — Teas with Fruity Aroma and Flavor
An Orchard in Your Teapot, Pt. I — Fruit in Your Tea  
Mercedes Apple Spice by The English Tea Store
Review: Mercedes Apple Spice Herbal
Review — Stash Cinnamon Apple Chamomile

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The Republic of Tea Get Gorgeous

The Republic of Tea Get Gorgeous

Name: Get Gorgeous

Brand: The Republic of Tea

Type: Rooibos, herbal blend

Form: Paper tea bags

Review: The Republic of Tea seems to enjoy blending rooibos, a naturally sweet and caffeine free herb with a variety of herbs. With the goal of promoting wellness, their “Be Well” line features rooibos and herbal blends that may help consumers address specific health concerns. This tisane is formulated with herbs that contain antioxidants, which may have an improving effect on the skin. As with my other reviews of this line of teas, I need to issue the caveat that I have no opinion on whether these tisanes actually have any health-enhancing properties, I’m just concerned with their drinkability.

Of all the teas that I’ve tried so far in this line, this is perhaps the most “ordinary” in flavor, though that isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The blend includes a variety of herbs such as chamomile, orange peel, hibiscus, red clover, burdock and chaste berry, flavored with pomegranate. This is a surprisingly light bodied tisane (not sure how much rooibos is in the teabags), with the characteristic tartness and slight sweetness that I expect from a blend that contains hibiscus. While it works as a hot beverage, I’d strongly recommend making this as an iced tea for maximum enjoyment.

Preparation Tips: I feel that the hibiscus/pomegranate combination tastes best on ice. One teabag is plenty for 8 ounces of water.

Serving Tips:  It’s tangy enough to be served with food, and, as an iced tea, would be a perfect foil to grilled meats.

Warning:  There is always a risk associated with consuming herbs, even “safe” herbs such as those contained in “Get Gorgeous”. If you are using medications or have a health condition, talk to your doctor before consuming this or any other herbal tisane or remedy.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Many tea lovers turn to tisanes, also known as herbal teas or “infusions,” when they want to avoid caffeine. While there is no dearth of herbal options on retailer’s shelves, one name that you might see more often is “tulsi,” also known as “holy basil.” Tulsi is an herb native to India, used in both cooking as well as in ayurvedic medicine. Unlike the basil that many Americans are most familiar with, ocimum basilicum or “sweet basil,” tulsi’s flavor is more reminiscent of clove than anise. When infused as a tisane, tulsi’s flavor is at once spicy, pungent, and sweet.

In traditional medicine, tulsi is considered to be an “adaptogen”: An herb that helps the body adapt to stress as needed. For many people, tulsi can be a fine beverage to help them unwind after a long day, but it can also steady the nerves as an all-day sipper. The sweetness of the tulsi can also calm sweet cravings, particularly if blended with other sweet or fruity flavors. As always, consumers of tulsi or any other herb should be aware of the possibility of allergic reactions or drug interactions, and should always talk to a medical professional about any health concerns before treating them with herbal remedies.

Stash Organic Lavender Tulsi - 18 Teabags

Stash Organic Lavender Tulsi

While tulsi is a great herb for tea or tisane blending, it can also be sipped on its own, without the addition of other teas and herbs. It brews up to a rich, spicy hot drink that doesn’t need any honey or other sweetener, though its strong flavor may take getting used to: If you don’t like clove, you may want to have some tulsi in a blend before trying it as a solo infusion.  In the summertime, have some on ice: It’s incredibly refreshing. Want to try it? The English Tea Store sells two tisanes from Stash that contain holy basil: The first is Stash Organic Lavender Tulsi and the second is Stash’s Mellow Moments. Both come in Stash’s nifty individually sealed teabag pouches, convenient for on-the-go sipping.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Stash Strawberry Pomegranate Red TeaName: Strawberry Pomegranate Herbal Red Tea

Brand: Stash

Type: Rooibos tisane, flavored

Form: Paper tea bag

Review: One of my great pet peeves is the trend of calling rooibos “red tea.” Rooibos, a shrub native to South Africa, is not a true tea at all, but produces a very nice, honey-sweet tisane (herbal infusion). It gets even more confusing because the Chinese use the term “red tea” (or “hong cha”) to describe what we in the West know as black tea. Teas are teas and tisanes are tisanes and that is that.

(inhale)

In any case, if you are in the market for a fruity, caffeine free tisane, this offering from Stash wouldn’t be a bad choice. It’s a blend of rooibos, raspberry leaves, rosehips and hibiscus flower with some pomegranate and strawberry flavors blended in. It’s naturally sweet on its own, so if you like your tisanes sweet and tangy, this isn’t a bad choice at all. But where it really shines is when paired with dark chocolate. Make yourself a hot cup of Strawberry Pomegrante Herbal Red Tea and break off a couple of squares of high-quality chocolate. Take a bite of chocolate, wash it down with a sip of tea. Really delicious and satisfying.

(Yum)

Preparation Tips: While I normally advise giving rooibos tisanes a good long infusion, the presence of hibiscus and rosehips in this blend forces me to do otherwise. Rose hips and hibiscus dominate blends if left to steep too long, and while I like both, they can do a lot to damage the flavor profile of a tea or tisane. Pour boiling water over your teabag, and let it sit between two and three minutes. Use a teaspoon to sample the tea periodically before removing the teabag.

Recommendation: The rooibos base contributes strongly to the flavor of this tisane, so don’t buy this if you don’t like rooibos. Otherwise, lovers of fruity rooibos tisanes should enjoy this one.

[Editor’s note: Our blog is chock full of great articles on this topic. Use our search feature to find them!]

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Categories

Explore our content:

Find us on these sites:


Follow Us!     Like Us!     Follow Us!     Follow Us!     Plus 1 Us!
Follow Tea Blog on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Tweet This!    add to del.icio.us    add to furl    digg this    stumble it!    add to simpy    seed the vine    add to reddit     post to facebook    technorati faves

Copyright Notice:

© Online Stores, LLC, and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, LLC., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Blog Affiliates

blogged
Bloglisting.net - The internets fastest growing blog directory

Networked Blogs

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: