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Trick or Treat! While children and teens dress up and go out for Halloween festivities, the adults are busy helping the youngsters prepare for one of the biggest nights of the year (next to Christmas). What kind of treat do the ones not trick-or-treating deserve? Maybe a warm cup of tea along with some scones or toast with jam or a nice sandwich with tangy mustard? You’ll be surprised to find all sorts of treats for the tea time fan.

While our shop sells rfcrm_cc_3pk_clotted_cream_and_jamsegular sized jams and jellies, these tiny jars of fruity goodness are just too cute to pass up! We are proud suppliers of Bonne Maman, a French jam company specializing in scrumptious flavors like fig, cherry, and strawberry and jarring them up with their trademark gingham lids. These jams are popular regular sized, so when they’re tiny, they’re even more irresistible. The smaller size makes it a lot easier to sample flavors you may not have tasted before or just simply spice things up by mixing up your favorite flavors. Try these jams on some bread, crumpets, or an English muffin! If you enjoy Bonne Maman’s jam, we carry larger sizes!teafcsc1000036761_-00_maille-honey-dijon-mustard-1-4oz

For those who are not a fan of sweet or just like a little savory (or tangy) before jam, there is a treat for you, too! Just like Bonne Maman, Maille Mustards come in a tiny jar, so you can treat yourself with a little dijon or whole grain and have a lot of flavor. Try these on a sandwich, with a fresh soft pretzel, or even in recipes! Just a few teaspoons or tablespoons and your dish will have a lovely zing to it! Maille Mustards are a well trusted brand, as they have been making mustards, vinegars, and other products for over 250 years.

Now, call these fun size, if you like! These may be tiny but you will get big taste and excellent quality from both Maille and Bonne Maman. And these treat sized jars are perfect year round, as you can get them for birthday parties (who wants a tea time themed birthday party? I sure do!), weddings, or baby showers. These are available for multiple jar purchase. Simply specify how many you need and we will do the best we can to work with you so you will be able to charm your guests!

Have a safe and Happy Halloween!

-CD

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Come October, most love to say that these last three months of the year are the best. Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas are some of the best times for celebrating. What better way to celebrate the upcoming holidays than with chocolate and who doesn’t love chocolate? Starting with Halloween, the sweet celebrations begin. As soon as October approaches, stores begin to not only sell Halloween candy but also Christmas decorations and a few sweets. You may say it’s too early but if you live in the UK and are a fan of chocolate, then it is tradition. This is because chocolate boxes and tins go on sale, and they are some of the most anticipated sweets of the holidays.

teatssc1000015120_-00_nestle-quality-street-tin-820-grams-2016Now these are no ordinary chocolates. These beautiful sweets are colorfully wrapped and in random shapes and sizes. Much like a box of standard chocolates, each package will tell you what to expect in each chocolate, except you can pick whichever ones you like!

Quality Street is made by Nestle, identifiable by the purple box or tub. Quality Street was created after a man named Harold Mackintosh inherited his father John’s toffee factory after his death in 1936 and Harold revolutionized Christmas chocolates. In the early days, only the wealthy could originally afford Christmas chocolates since they were made with imported ingredients but with Mackintosh’s plan to use local ingredients, it lowered the prices of his chocolate and made Chhxm_08_c133_-00_cadbury-roses-tub-2016ristmas chocolate affordable to everyone. His invention, Quality Street, is made in the original factory from 1936. In 1988, Nestle purchased the brand and has owned it ever since. In previous holiday seasons, Nestle has released entire single serve chocolate bars devoted to favorite flavors of Quality Street (like honeycomb crunch and even chocolate green triangle). There has even been a giant strawberry! Quality Street was named after a play written by Scottish playwright J.M. Barrie, who was mostly known for writing Peter Pan.

Cadbury Roses are the Cadbury equivalent of Quality Street, launched in 1938 to compete with the main brand of Christmas chocolate. The Roses name apparently comes from “Rose Brothers”. Cadbury Roses have only 10 varieties of chocolates.

teatssc1000020922_-00_cadbury-heroes-11-39oz-323g_1Finally, another hit among chocolate lovers is the Cadbury Heroes. This is a mixture of Cadbury favorites like Dairy Milk, Fudge, Wispa, Dairy Milk Caramel, Twirl, Eclair, and Creme Egg Twisted. The best part of this is that they are all miniatures! These “fun sized” treats come in a range of sizes from small bags, to boxes, to large tubs.

All of these wonderful sweets are delicious and are enjoyed throughout generations. Their popularity is growing throughout the world so it’s no wonder it’s gaining attention here in the States. The tradition of Christmas chocolates have been well-established with British families and now American families can create new traditions with them. Try some today. You will wonder how your holidays ever did without!

-CD

 

So often I get comments from folks saying that they are scared to try various teas. Or scared of tea altogether…it’s too complicated…it can turn out bitter…it can get oversteeped or have no taste at all… and so on. But don’t let tea scare you! It’s really quite simple. No need for witches’ cauldrons, strange ingredients like bats’ wings, and sorcerers’ apprentices making your brooms and buckets (or your teapots and cups) dance all by themselves. You just need to know a few conjurers’ (that is, steepers’) secrets.

A magic brew! (composite image by A.C. Cargill)

A magic brew! (composite image by A.C. Cargill)

Conjurers’ Secret #1

Make sure your water is free of ghosts and goblins and things that go “bump!” in the night. The better the water, the better start to that pot of tea. And the less likely you will be of getting frightened to the point of having your hair turn white (unless it already is white, in which case you will be shocked into it turning some other odd color such as fuchsia or even mauve). I use bottled spring water to be sure it is free of chlorine and chloramine, but you could use a filter on your kitchen faucet to reduce excess minerals in the water.

Conjurers’ Secret #2

Use a proper cauldron……uh, tea kettle. It needn’t be large enough for Hansel and Gretel to fit in though – just enough to hold the amount of water you’ll need to heat for your tea. They have quite a size range, so just select the one closest to the amount of tea you usually make at any one time. My tea kettle holds about 48 ounces (6 cups) of water, but others are larger or smaller. And no need to start up a roaring wood fire in a forest clearing in the dead of night. There are stovetop kettles and electric kettles so you can heat water for that cuppa any time you feel the urge.

Conjurers’ Secret #3

Employ a proper teapot for steeping that tea. Which is proper will depend largely on the tea you are steeping.

  • Black tea – A ceramic teapot, a Brown Betty (earthenware teapot), a glass teapot, or even a silver teapot.
  • Green tea – Lots of options from a glass (yes, a glass!) to a gaiwan to a Yixing teapot to even a porcelain or ceramic teapot.
  • White tea – same as for green tea.
  • Oolong – gaiwan, Yixing teapot, ceramic/porcelain teapot, even a glass.
  • Pu-erh – gaiwan, Yixing teapot.

Conjurers’ Secret #4

Let the tea dance with the water. You needn’t play any music, though. The dance of the tea seems to go with it’s own music, and it’s not “Night on Bald Mountain,” “Thriller,” the theme from “Ghostbusters,” or even “Monster Mash.” The leaves will float and sink and rise back up. They will become bloated as the cells refill with water that was evaporated out of them during processing. But unlike corpses in a swamp, these leaves become quite lovely as they swell up in that water.

Conjurers’ Secret #5

Watch out for the time. Remember that just as Cinderella’s dress turned back into rags, the coach turned back into a pumpkin, and the horses, coachman, and footmen turned back into little critters when that clock finished striking the hour of midnight, so will your tea turn into something rather unpleasant or even downright monstrous…like those gremlins getting water splashed on them or Swamp Thing becoming a deformed (but still gentle hearted) creature saving Adrienne Barbeau from disaster…if you oversteep. How long you can let your tea steep will be a matter of your own personal taste as well as a matter of the tea you are steeping. Black tea usually goes 3 to 5 minutes while you chant “Don’t be bitter. Don’t be bitter.” (Works every time.) Green teas are generally steeped only 1 to 3 minutes. Don’t forget to chant. However, some pu-erhs can be steeped as short as 30 seconds and as long as 10 minutes and you usually don’t need to chant to avoid bitterness, especially if it’s a pu-erh that has been aged at least 10 years.

Bonus: Your Special Spell for a Perfect Tea Time

Round about the cauldron go;
In the lovely tea leaves throw.
Leaves that on a mount’n did grow
Slept in winter under snow.
Pluck’d and processed while it’s hot
Ready now to steep in pot.
Toss in whole the black Typhoo
Box and all into the brew;
Add in pouch of some Earl Grey
Steep up quick ’fore light of day!
Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.
Drink it when the time is right
Drink to make a perfect night!

(My thanks to Shakespeare for the inspiration.)

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Hubby and I have a fairly low threshold when it comes to scary stuff. So have no fear, the scare factor here is pretty low. About a 1 on a scale of 1 to 10. In fact, it’s so not scary that it’s more on the cute side, as you can see in the photo below. However, for those of you who think The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Chuckie, A Nightmare on Elm Street (and its sequels), and the Halloween movie series are tame, I present a few tips for a really scary tea time.

Okay, so it’s more cute than scary! (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Okay, so it’s more cute than scary! (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

First, set up a motion-activated sound effect of a howling wolf or ghostly moaning so when your guests approach the front door, they will hear it. (Caution: don’t use the sound of someone screaming or gunshots since your guests could end up using their cell phones to call 911 and you’d have the cops showing up, which would be very scary.)

Second, have a giant rubber or plastic spider drop down in front of them when they ring the doorbell. This will be especially effective for the arachnophobes on your guest list. Be prepared for someone succumbing to the sheer terror of this, though, by them collapsing on your front stoop/porch. Best to have an oxygen tank or defibrillator handy just in case.

Third, lead your guests into the kitchen, hand them aprons, show them the raw ingredients and cookwares laid out, and tell them to start cooking or they could end up in the dungeon you just constructed under the house. Drop hints about how that witch in Hansel and Gretel had a good idea about fattening up her victims before roasting them. Your guests will get the idea pretty quickly here.

Fourth and scariest of all, don’t serve any tea. Or worse yet, serve one of those pseudo teas — one of those infusions made from rooibos, honeybush, chamomile, ginger root, ginseng, hibiscus, or any other number of plants that are not Camellia Sinensis. Or maybe serve coffee or guayusa or yerba mate. That would certainly scare the begeebees out of me.

Whatever scary plans you have in store for your tea time guests, be sure to let them know that it’s all meant in good fun!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The kiddies are getting their costumes ready (or more likely mommy and daddy are getting them ready). And the adults (in-between the costume making) are piling up the treats. In this house, we’re skipping the costume part (no kids here) and going straight for the treat part. Yay!

Trick-or-treating usually involves a lot of candy. Mini chocolate candy bars, teeth busting hard candies, taffy and peanut butter chews to stick in your teeth, the seasonal favorite candy corn and pumpkins, and other high-sugar treats. But there are lots of alternatives, some not so high in sugar, and some that are not even candy. Here are a few we found:

  • Fall Harvest Snacker Gift BasketA hand-painted basket filled with warm and comforting flavors of Fall! What could be a better gift for birthdays, anniversaries, housewarmings, or just because? The basket includes: a frosted Autumn pumpkin cookie, creamy vegetable cheese spread, 3 pepper crackers, 3-ounce beef salami, stuffed olives, honey mustard pretzels, Chamberry chocolates, Sonoma three cheese swirls, 2-ounce caramel corn. Lots to crunch and munch at tea time.
Fall Harvest Snacker Gift Basket (ETS image)

Fall Harvest Snacker Gift Basket (ETS image)

  • Sticky Fingers Pumpkin Cranberry Scone MixA combination of two favorite seasonal flavors makes these scones extra special. Sticky Fingers scone mixes make scone baking as easy as open-add water-mix-bake. You’ll have hot, tasty scones in the blink of an eye. And these, with their spices, rich pumpkin flavor, and cranberry pieces, will be the best for your fall tea time. Each package makes about 12 medium-sized scones. Certified OU and D Kosher. Top with butter, clotted cream or even pumpkin butter!
Sticky Fingers Pumpkin Cranberry Scones: On the left is the mix (ETS image), on the right is the result (Stickyfingersbakeries.com image)

Sticky Fingers Pumpkin Cranberry Scones: On the left is the mix (ETS image), on the right is the result (Stickyfingersbakeries.com image)

  • ShortbreadDelicious Scottish shortbread from top companies like Walkers, Border, and O’Neill’s. Buttery and crumbly, these shortbreads will melt in your mouth. Our traditional Scottish shortbread comes in a variety of tins, styles and flavors.
Shortbread brands (ETS images)

Shortbread brands (ETS images)

A box of 6 Mr Kipling Cherry Bakewells (ETS images) and a close-up of one of these tasty treats via Yahoo! Images

A box of 6 Mr Kipling Cherry Bakewells (ETS images) and a close-up of one of these tasty treats via Yahoo! Images

  • Almondina Gingerspice Cookie BiscuitsThe Almondina company was founded by Yuval Zaliouk, symphony conductor and gourmet chef, who wanted to bring his grandmother Dina’s recipe for Petit Gateau Sec (Little Crisp Cakes) to the American market. This cookie is the ginger version but, like the original, is free of cholesterol, salt, preservatives, and most fat (the only fat is from the almonds), yet is wonderfully crunchy, flavorful, and perfect with tea. (The name “Almondina” is a tribute to grandma Dina.)
Almondina Gingerspice Cookie Biscuits in the package (ETS Image) and a close-up via Yahoo! Images.

Almondina Gingerspice Cookie Biscuits in the package (ETS Image) and a close-up via Yahoo! Images.

Don’t those all sound scrumptious? While the kids are out ringing doorbells and yelling “Trick or treat!” you can be snuggled at home with some of these and, of course, a pot or two of your favorite tea!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

We want to thank you all for reading our blog and trying the store products. Have a safe and happy Halloween!

Have a great Halloween Tea Time (Image by Vicky at The English Tea Store)

Have a great Halloween Tea Time (Image by Vicky at The English Tea Store)

Classic Monster Movies (Source: screen capture from site)

Classic Monster Movies (Source: screen capture from site)

What tea you drink for Halloween and thereabouts might have a lot to do with whether you’re human or creature. If you’re not sure which side of the fence you fall on, I can’t help you much with that. But read on and I’ll try to cover a little bit of each.

HUMANS
As a human (as nearly as I can tell) I find my preference for more robust teas increasing as the weather begins to cool and the days shorten. For me “more robust” means black tea. Which is a type of tea that I like to drink all year round, if the truth be told, but even more so when the icy winds begin to blow (“icy” being a relative term here in the Arizona desert).

I don’t care much for flavorings in my black tea but, if you do, that’s perfectly alright. Obviously, there are certain flavorings that, if not associated specifically with Halloween, are linked to fall, the harvest season, and the holidays in general. One of the most obvious of these is the great pumpkin, naturally. Which is usually paired with some sort of spice, as in the case of the Pumpkin Spice offerings listed here and here. And, of course, it’s not that big of a step from these varieties to masala chai, that old tried and true blend of spices and black tea.

CREATURES
Vampires
What would Dracula drink? Well, assuming that the old Count was denied his favorite beverage, one has to assume that he’d go with a nice red “tea,” better known as rooibos or redbush. Which is a tisane, to be perfectly technical about it, not tea in the strictest sense.

Ghost
White tea, of course, with perhaps just a dash of ectoplasm.

Zombie
Green tea – though yellow might work as well – to match its rotting, cadaverous appearance.

Werewolf
I can’t put a finger on why, but it seems to me that the bold, earthy flavors of puerh would be perfect for the werewolf on your list.

Dragon
I’m have no idea what tea dragons might prefer, but at least the fire-breathing ones never have to worry about it getting cold.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Every year on October 31st (or thereabouts), it’s “Ding dong — trick or treat” time! Some of us, though, tend to hide out, keeping the lights down low or off altogether, and gobble up those treats in a special tea time (tea mishaps in the dark are a small price to pay). How piggish of us!

Some things you have to wait all year for. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Some things you have to wait all year for. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

But can you blame us? There are some treats that are available only for the Halloween season, so we have to make the most of it. The majority of these treats is candy, and there is a tendency to forego our usually healthy diet in favor of these sweets.

An online search revealed, though, that search engines are tending to pop up articles first that discourage trick-or-treating altogether and list at the top of the results such articles as “How to Keep Your Kids Away from Sweets at Halloween.” Political correctness dominating the Internet. Still, the stores, both brick-and-mortar and online, are well-stocked with the usual assortment and some not so usual choices. While Yahoo and Google have adjusted their algorithms to make certain anti-treat articles appear at the top, consumers are voting with their wallets for those candy pumpkins, mini chocolate bars, licorice is a variety of colors and shapes, and a horde of others.

Hm…discouraging the kiddies from collecting those special treats could be advantageous to us adults. No need to hide out. We could bring out that bag of mini chocolate bars and have some with a nice pot of tea. Hey, everybody keeps saying how healthy tea is, right? So it should balance out the chocolate. And the high-fructose corn syrup. And the artificial colors and flavors. Etcetera.

A few tea options:

  • Assam — best with dark chocolate
  • Darjeeling — best with dark chocolate, milk chocolate, and white chocolate
  • Dragonwell —best with milk chocolate and white chocolate
  • Earl Grey — best with dark chocolate
  • Gyokuro — best with dark chocolate
  • Oolong — best with dark chocolate, milk chocolate, and white chocolate
  • Pu-erh — best with dark chocolate
  • Sencha — best with milk chocolate and white chocolate
  • Yunnan — best with milk chocolate and white chocolate

And even though they’re not the usual things to drop into those trick-or-treat bags, pecan and pumpkin tarts will accompany those teas and chocolates. Some Ceylon tea, either black or green, would also go great with these tarts.

Oops! Just dribbled some saliva on my keyboard. Time to sign off and turn off the lights. And if that doorbell rings, I’m definitely not home!

See also:
Getting Ghoulish for Your Halloween Tea Time
British Candies Are Perfect for Halloween
“Frightful” Tea Treats
Tea Moments — The Trick-or-Treaters
A Pirate-ish Tea Time Treat

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

This time of year a confectionary staple appears magically by the ton on store shelves: candy corn. It’s been around since the 1880’s and for some people is a treat not to be missed. For others, though, the very mention of those two little words “candy” and “corn” said together as a single entity sends chills down their spines and a wave of queasiness through their insides. It also tends to spark the Great Candy Corn Debate.

Nothing says Autumn like candy corn — or does it? (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Nothing says Autumn like candy corn — or does it? (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

As with many debates, a lot of emotions are stirred, with each side declaring the other to be scallywags, blackguards, and downright knaves for holding their views in such complete opposition.

Those who hate candy corn seem to do so with such gusto and a great passionate revulsion, just as many would react to something truly horrid such as an oversteeped Chun Mee green tea or milk in their cup of hot Silver Needle tea. They say things like this (actual comments made by real anti-candy cornists):

  • “Dentists have made a lot of money off candy corn cavities.”
  • “candy corn is awful. i have always hated it. i would rather eat chalk.”
  • “As children, my older sister loved candy corn and I could never figure out the appeal.”
  • “I don’t like candy corn either. I never thought there was much to it just sugary wax.”
  • “It makes an excellent projectile…”
  • “I question the origin of people who eat it. I feel like they might just be from outer space. Seriously.”

Those who love candy corn often got hooked on it as kids and say that they eagerly look forward to this treat reappearing in stores when October rolls around once more. They also say things like this (actual comments made by real pro-candy cornists):

  • “Well, its a tradition. I only feel like eating candy corn in the month of October… it just makes me feel in place.”
  • “…candy corn is a Halloween tradition or I should say institution!”
  • “I admit, I do like candy corn, but only this time of year. Yes, it is sickly sweet, but for me it is like a comforting, return-to-my-childhood Halloween custom.”
  • “I like candy corn but, like anything, in moderation.”

The moderation thing was a common theme, as was the claim that, like fruit cakes, all candy corn was made decades ago and keeps getting passed around, growing increasingly stale. Not true for either item, as those of us who like fruit cakes and/or candy corn can attest. Of course, such stories make great fodder for stand-up comedians like Lewis Black.

Being in the “like” camp, I just had to buy a bag, but went for the mix that includes candy pumpkins in addition to the corn. Time to steep up some tea, grab a cuppa and that bag of sweet treats, and find a nice quiet corner with plenty of solitude.

Oh, to those of you who don’t like candy corn I say, “Thanks! More for me!”

See also:
Tea and Candy Corn

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Chester the Cat Teapot (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

Chester the Cat Teapot (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

As this globe we live on repeats another orbit round the Sun, we come again to Halloween and, of course, that means some spooky, eerie, and downright scary tea times!

Cats always figure pretty big at Halloween, but as Janis Badarau also points out, they are always part of tea time. So, cats and Halloween themes at tea time just go together naturally. That means, also naturally, that a cat-shaped teapot is a must! I must confess, though, that this Chester the Cat Teapot is not the least bit scary. He actually seems to be — gasp! — grinning!! — and not in one of those “just wait until you fall for my dastardly plan” sort of grins, but a grin that actually looks — are you sitting down? — HAPPY!!

“Ghoulish Green” 6-Cup Amsterdam Teapot (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

“Ghoulish Green” 6-Cup Amsterdam Teapot (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

Now, happiness has it’s place, but not at your ghoulish Halloween Tea Time. It’s better suited for when you get that “A” on your final exam in math, when your daughter or son has a “no cavities found” dental check up for the first time ever, when it’s Friday at 5 p.m. and you’re off to spend the weekend at that lakeside retreat. A Halloween tea time, though, is for spooky chills up the spine, dimly lit rooms, strange sounds coming from outside or even beneath the floor under your feet (just tell your guests that it’s your college-age kid home for the weekend in the basement — this is really creepy if you don’t have a basement!). No, as cute as he is, Chester will not convey such an atmosphere.

“Impish Hideout” Tea Canister in “Dead of Night” Black (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

“Impish Hideout” Tea Canister in “Dead of Night” Black (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

Maybe a “Ghoulish Green” 6-Cup Amsterdam Teapot would be a better alternative and lend the right level of creepiness to the affair.

Ahhh…that’s more like it. And if you steep up some green tea to serve from it, you can say the teapot has a head cold or sinus infection as you pour out that sickly yellowish-green liquid. Bwahahahahahahaha!

Store that tea in a stylish “Impish Hideout” Tea Canister in “Dead of Night” Black and make a point of letting your guests see the lid open slowly with a creaking, rusty hinge sound (low lighting, a strand of fishing line attached to the lid and hanging down by your side of the table — you get the idea!).

“Yowling Yellow” Classic 11oz Cafe Mug (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

“Yowling Yellow” Classic 11oz Cafe Mug (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

Serve up your “snot funny” tea in an appropriately colored mug, such as one in “Yowling Yellow” or go with one in “Vampire Bloody Red”.

“Vampire Bloody Red” Classic 11oz Cafe Mug (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

“Vampire Bloody Red” Classic 11oz Cafe Mug (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

In addition to those fairly “normal” tea time goodies, like “pumpkin guts” pies (an accurate name — think about it!), candy “scarecrow teeth” corn, caramel “shrunken head” apples, and popcorn balls split in half and served up as leprechaun brains, go for treats like some “Bloodshot Eyeball Cakes” from Mr Kipling (yeah, they call those things cherries, but you and I know the truth!!):

Mr Kipling “Bloodshot Eyeball” Cakes (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

Mr Kipling “Bloodshot Eyeball” Cakes (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

Give your tea time guests something to wonder about when you pass them a plateful of these “Bug Bits Cookies” Shortbread by Walkers (sure, they call these “Chocolate Chips” but this time of year, you never know):

Walkers “Bug Bits Cookies” Shortbread (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

Walkers “Bug Bits Cookies” Shortbread (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

A final note here: If you really want to scare your Halloween tea time guests, then run out of tea and treats. That’s the scariest thing of all!

Related articles:
Cat Lovers and Tea
Have a Ghost in for Tea
“Spooky” Teawares
Tea Moments — The Trick-or-Treaters
Tea and Candy Corn
British Candies Are Perfect for Halloween
“Basic Black” Teawares

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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© Online Stores, LLC, and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, LLC., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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