“Tea,” by Edward Bamber

I've lost track of how many old tea books I've written about by now. But it's safe to say that, if you were so inclined, you could spend quite a bit of time reading these volumes, all of which I've accessed online for free. I was starting to think I was exhausting the supply of …

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10 Top Ways That Printed Tea Books Beat Out Those e-Versions

When Johnny Carson was host of the Tonight Show (yes, I’m that old), he would do a countdown of 10 top this or that. I am now shamelessly “borrowing” that routine here (as others have done before me) with my top 10 ways those print version tea books are much better than those e-book versions.10 …

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The Twinings in Three Centuries

If you wanted to discourse on the various members of the Twinings tea dynasty, you certainly wouldn't be at a loss for material. The company moved into their fourth century of operations a few years ago and the latest of the Twinings line - Stephen Twining - is in the tenth generation of tea people …

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Richard Twining’s Observations on the Tea Trade (1785)

It should come as no surprise that the various family members of a prominent English tea company should come in for a mention here now and then, at a site that's focused on English tea and tea culture. That family is, of course, the Twining family, whose firm started operating long before Americans had even …

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“Tea Culture: The Experiment in South Carolina” by Charles Upham Shepard

It's probably safe to say by now that tea production in South Carolina has progressed beyond being an experiment or that the experiment has succeeded or what have you. Of all of the many states that currently produce tea - most on a very modest scale - South Carolina is the most significant. It's home …

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Book Review: “The Infusiast”

Tea books are pure delight and range from very technical and specific to a particular type of tea to more broad or just plain fun. Many tea books have been showcased on this blog, both in actual reviews but also in fellow blogger Bill Lengeman’s monthly roundup of recent and upcoming tea books. This is …

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Recent and Upcoming Tea Books 10

Though the focus here is (obviously) on recent and upcoming tea books every once in a while I like to mention one that's been around for a while. I mentioned this one here about four years ago but I thought I'd throw it out there again. You may have read reviews of Harney & Sons …

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The Books of The Book of Tea

What's the most influential book ever written about tea? Ancient Chinese scholar Lu Yu wrote one that's said to be one of the first ever written about tea, but it's not very easy to get your hands on an English copy nowadays. In much more modern times, the blue ribbon might arguably go to the …

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A Mistress and her Servant. – Dialogues on Trade in Tea and Sugar, Etc.

You could probably make a vocation out of studying those many and varied old texts about tea that are now available for free, in digital editions, if you were so inclined. Which would be great work if you could get it and I've written about quite a few of them at this site. Some are …

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Tea and the Tea Trade, circa 1850

An American merchant who spent much of his life living in China, Gideon Nye wrote a number of books on various aspects of Chinese studies, many of which are available in your favorite free digital archive. For purposes of this article, the most noteworthy of these tomes was the 1850 volume (the third edition) he …

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