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http://www.nationalteaday.co.uk/ April 21st, 2017

National Tea Day is celebrated in April in the UK. While tea is the most popular beverage in the UK, this is its official day. This day is entirely different from National Hot Tea Day in the US, which is celebrated each January. This day celebrates all aspects of tea, including Afternoon Tea, one of the most popular times to enjoy tea.

Whether you have a full on English Afternoon Tea with some friends or just a cup while curling up on the couch, take the time to treat yourself to a fine brew. It’s always completely up to you if you want to go to with a familiar favorite like PG Tips or Typhoo or go with something new and different like Taylor’s of Harrogate. Have some English Breakfast, Green Tea, or how about something unfamiliar? Try a few of these teas that are becoming popular all over the world:

Darjeeling: Known as the “Champagne of Teas”, this reigns one of the best in its class. Darjeeling is grown in India, in the Darjeeling district, which is where it gets its name. Brands to try: English Tea Store, Twinings, Harney and Sons, and Taylors of Harrogate.

Oolong: A popular Chinese tea, this distinctive tea is just a bit fermented and oxidized for a perfect balance of green and black tea. Brands to try: English Tea Store Orange Blossom Oolong, Twinings China Oolong.

Assam: Assam tea was named after the region in which it was grown in India. It is a black tea with a strong malty flavor and deep bronze color. It is perfect for breakfast or any other time of day with a little sugar and milk. Brands to try: English Tea Store and Taylors of Harrogate.

What kind of tea would you celebrate National Tea Day with and who would you share your cup with? If you are a tea lover, then National Tea Day is every day!

 

-CD

 

Various Teas to Pair With Food

Tea is the new wine! Pairing tea with various foods is similar to pairing with wine. Usually people serve white wine with white meat and red wine with red meat. There is a misguided perception that the color of the wine and food determine how the two are paired together. It is all about providing a flavor adventure for the palate.

Green tea is lightly oxidized forming a perfect pair with foods such as seafood, salads, and fruit. It is ideal to go with foods customarily served with white wine including scallops and  lobster. Chinese green teas such jasmine and dragonwell have a bold flavor and aroma making them an ideal match for salads and chicken dishes.

Black tea is completely oxidized giving it its rich and full-bodied flavor. It pairs well with foods normally served with red wine including meats, curries, and pastries. Black tea is an excellent complement to chocolate candy. There are several types of black teas including  flavored black tea,  Assam, lapsang souchong and blackcurrant.

Oolong tea is a cross between black and green tea. Lightly oxidized oolong tea pairs perfectly with foods routinely served with white wine. Medium to dark oxidized oolong teas form an ideal pair with foods that are usually served with red wine such as Chinese, Thai, and grilled foods.

While tea is sometimes regaled as the new wine, there are two significant advantages to switching beverages. A person does not take the chance of intoxication and a perfect alternative for those who do not drink wine. Let us not forget there is an extensive variety of tea. Brew a cup of tea with a meal and enjoy.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

A classic post originally published 02.10.2009

This will hardly be a thesis, but I thought it might be interesting to get a little bit of historical perspective on oolong, that type of tea that is generally less known than black and green but better known than relatively obscure teas such as white, yellow, and puerh. Needless to say it’s not mentioned quite as often in historical records as black or green tea, but it does come in for a mention now and then.

English Tea Store brand Oolong Teas (ETS image)

English Tea Store brand Oolong Teas (ETS image)

One of the earliest references I was able to locate was from 1798, in a book called Around the Tea-table, by Thomas De Witt Talmage. It’s a rather fanciful book of stories, more or less, as they might be told around a tea table. In the first paragraph the author mentions oolong tea, along with a variety that’s rather obscure these days, “Let the ring of the tea-bell be sharp and musical. Walk into the room fragrant with Oolong or Young Hyson.”

From just ten years later, I ran across a somewhat unlikely reference from none other than the Annual Report of the New York (State) Bureau of Labor Statistics. Which presents a table of wholesale prices of oolong and other types of tea “in the New York market” from the previous decade. At which time Formosa Oolong could be had for as little as 21 cents. That’s presumably for a pound, though it’s not made completely clear.

Even more unlikely, at least a bit, is a reference from the Minnesota Farmers’ Institute Annual, of 1835. If you find it hard to imagine Minnesotans of that day sipping oolong tea, consider that a company currently displaying at the state fair offered a range of goods including oolong tea. In The Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, from 1844, a number of references are made about oolong tea, describing it in a way that suggests that it’s something of a curiosity and also noting that it is “high-flavoured” and comes from China.

A few years later The Golden Rule and Odd-fellows Family Companion, which was apparently a periodical of the day, waxed rather lyrical about “Divine Oolong,” going on sing the praises of “this oolong, ripe, well-cured,” though it seems that it might all have been part and parcel of an advertisement for the Pekin Tea Company:

And our heart is warmed to kinship
With the Pekin Company:
Well art though named celestial,
Land of the oolong tea!

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

This is the second of the two Taiwan oolongs I recently sampled via English Tea Store. The first tea, Formosa Oolong Estate, which I reviewed on October 16, was a darker, more roasted type of oolong. Spring Pouchong is from the other end of the spectrum; namely, a greenish, flowery oolong. And while I enjoyed the Formosa Oolong, this tea much more closely suits my taste.

Spring Pouchong - green tea or oolong? (Photo source: article author)

Spring Pouchong – green tea or oolong? (Photo source: article author)

Curiously, ETS lists this as a green tea, not as an oolong. In their catalogue they describe the tea as being “allowed to oxidize for a limited amount of time.” Inasmuch as oolong teas are oxidized and green teas are not, I’d have to quibble with their classification. In the spirit of tea and harmony, however, let’s agree to call this a “green oolong” – in other words, a lightly oxidized (or, if you prefer, fermented) oolong. Which is essentially what the term pouchong, or the currently more popular baozhong, refers to.

Having cleared that up, let’s get down to specifics. In a word, this tea is delightful. It’s almost like sipping a cup of springtime. Light, fresh, and floral – just the way I like my oolongs.

The aroma of springtime is evident in the dry leaf when I open the package, and the floral scent becomes more pronounced when hot water meets leaves in the pot. Using the same “modified-modified gong-fu style” method described in the previous post, I steeped this tea in my little blue ducky clay pot and combined each infusion into a larger teapot after sampling it individually.

The first three infusions were smooth and delicate and rich with springtime blossoms, a treat for both nose and palate. Followed by the next three – a little lighter but still evident. Unlike higher-end specialty pouchongs, this tea started to fade after the fifth steeping; there’s just not enough character left to really do a sixth. Still, five infusions isn’t bad.

This is not one of those highly nuanced pouchongs with layers of taste and aroma. It’s a straightforwardly delightful oolong that delivers the flowery essence of a fresh spring meadow. And most mornings that’s exactly what I want in my cup.

For anyone who’s looking for an excellent example of a floral “green” pouchong at a good price I’d recommend this tea without reservation. It’s a delightfully perfect cup to start off the day.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Ever ones to experiment with our teas, hubby and I came up with a different way to approach multiple steepings of oolongs. It’s a bit unorthodox. Some might even call it oolong blasphemy.

A popular Chinese oolong Tie Kuan Yin “Iron Goddess of Mercy” has the typical large leaves. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

A popular Chinese oolong Tie Kuan Yin “Iron Goddess of Mercy” has the typical large leaves. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Multiple steepings are usually short and quick. We find that the teas are often too hot to drink immediately after steeping and therefore do not convey their full flavors. So some cooling time is needed after which we can detect the subtle nuances more clearly. Timing is crucial here, though, for if the tea cools too much, those nuances can be lost or a bitterness creep in.

Our Methodology

These teas are usually steeped in water heated to just below boiling (some vendors say to boil the water and then let it sit for one minute). The steeping times can be as short as 30 seconds and as long as 2 minutes. Trust me, in the world of tea steeping, especially for those of us who steep mainly black teas where we boil the water and then steep for 5 minutes, such a short timeframe for oolongs seems like an Olympic sprint: heat water, pour into vessel over tea leaves, set timer, DING! done already, strain into cups, heat more water, pour into vessel over tea leaves, set timer, try to sip first steeping, still too hot, DING! dang that was fast, strain into other cups while first steeping is cooling, heat more water… I think you get the idea here.

Solutions

Sure, we can do the obvious: wait until that first steeped liquid cools to the right temperature before heating more water and doing another steeping of the tea leaves. Much too practical and it gives us little sips of tea that have to be consumed fairly quickly. I must confess that hubby and I prefer our tea in larger quantities. Much much larger.

Three tiny steepings, each with its own flavors, can be combined into one bigger cuppa with a fused flavor. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Three tiny steepings, each with its own flavors, can be combined into one bigger cuppa with a fused flavor. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

A better solution is that blasphemous one we alluded to above. Go ahead and do that Olympic sprint steeping session (for most oolongs 7 or 8 steepings are possible), and each time you strain out the liquid from the steeping vessel, strain it into another larger vessel that can hold the accumulated amount. We recently did 7 infusions with 6 ounces of water each for a wonderful oolong we were trying a second time (initially, we used a more normal approach) and so needed a container that could hold 42 ounces. You have several advantages here:

  • The tea that was just steeped will be cooled a little and will cool the hotter tea from that next steeping that is poured into it.
  • The final liquid will be at about the exact right temperature for a maximum flavor development and will also not scorch your tongue.

One reason this might be seen as blasphemous is the change in flavor between infusions. Our method wipes that out, with each infusion blended with the others to form a composite flavor. For the initial tasting of a new tea, therefore, we would never use this method. But for subsequent steeping sessions, we prefer this every time. We can then pour a nice cuppa and sip on it at our ease.

Now, even though this has been mainly about oolong tea, it applies equally well to any tea that can be steeped multiple times.

A couple of good oolongs and even a green tea and a white tea to try this way:

  • Spring Pouchong — From one of the most beautiful tea producing places of the world, Pinglin Township in Taiwan with a pristine waterway surrounded by thick forests and accessible by one tiny road lined on both sides by small workshops where the Pouchong is produced and packed. Pouchong comes from special bushes that grow on only a few tracts of land around the town, the leaves are plucked and only allowed to oxidize for a limited amount of time before being wrapped in paper and dried. This tea is processed entirely by hand and is an exceptional tea, with fragrances of flowers and melon, and a rich, yet mild cup. Steep in water heated to 165-190° F for 1-3 minutes. Repeat several times.
  • Ti Kuan Yin Iron Goddess Oolong — Semi-fermented with a unique flavor, not to be picked too early or at too tender of a stage, and then produced immediately. Tea leaves are wilted in the direct sun and then shaken in tubular bamboo baskets to bruise the leaf edges so they oxidize faster than the center. After 15-25 minutes, the tea is fired, locking in that unique flavor. The taste can at first be bitter, then sweet, and finishes with a fragrance that lingers on your palate. This tea steeps up light with a pale green-yellow color. Steep in water heated to 165-190° F for 1-3 minutes. Repeat several times.
  • Pearl River Green Tea — A top quality green tea with an even, curly leaf achieved by only the best leaves, so they are hand-sorted out, one by one. The leaves are only plucked in the pre-dawn when covered with a misty dew to improve the taste, delivering a full flavor and a delicate pungency and body with a bright forest green color. Steep in water heated to 150-180° F for 1-4 minutes. Repeat several times.
  • Pai Mu Tan White TeaA rarity even today, but during the T’ang Dynasty (618-907 AD) white teas were reserved for members of the Imperial Courts. White tea undergoes very little processing and has a delicate flavor, pure enough for society’s elite. The fresh leaf is delivered to the factory on foot, then withered, lightly rolled, and dried naturally, resulting in a leaf color from pale green to silvery, with lots of tips, and the liquid is slightly pale with a smooth flavor and fresh aroma. Steep in steaming water for 1-4 minutes. Repeat several times.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Ti Kuan Yin Iron Goddess Oolong (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

Ti Kuan Yin Iron Goddess Oolong (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

The triathlon is an event that requires both endurance and physical versatility. It consists of three sections where competitors must swim 1.5 km (0.93 mile), cycle 40 km (25 mile), and finally run 10 km (6.2 mile). The women’s triathlon takes place on the 4th of August, beginning at 9:00am BST, or 4:00am EST (this might be one to watch on reply if you are in the states). The men’s triathlon takes place on the 7th of August, beginning at 4:30pm BST, or 11:30am EST.

The women’s triathlon is up first, and a great way to enjoy this multi-sport event is with three different teas: one for the swim, one for the cycle, and one for the run—a tea-athlon, if you will! Although completing a tea-athlon may not elicit the awe and admiration of friends and family in quite the same way as a triathlon (unless they happen to have a strong aversion to tea…), I like to think that it is still an accomplishment to be proud of. For my tea-athlon, I will be starting with a coconut green tea, then moving onto Ti Kuan Yin (Iron Goddess), an oolong, and finishing with a ginger black tea. I would suggest moving from lighter to heavier teas, as your palette will adjust better. And don’t worry—you’ll have plenty of time to get through all that tea. As you might imagine, all that swimming, cycling, and running takes a while; the current record for the women’s triathlon, held by Emma Snowsill (Australia), is 1:58:27:66.

Ginger Naturally Flavored Black Tea (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

Ginger Naturally Flavored Black Tea (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

For the men’s triathlon, which takes place three days later, you could repeat your tea-athlon, and perhaps change some of the teas you select. If you wanted to switch it up even more, I would suggest brewing up some Russian Caravan. This slightly smoky tea is actually a blend of three teas (lapsang souchong, a black tea such as assam or keemun, and an oolong): the perfect tri-tea for a triathlon!

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

There are many different tea experiences to be had, and there has been some discussion on this blog recently about different ways to take your tea and the conflicts this might create (see the articles here, and here). Tea houses take many shapes and forms, with some offering an overwhelming selection of teas and some offering only one. Some are styled in a traditional East Asian manner, with tea served gong fu style, or in cast iron pots, while others serve afternoon tea English-style. When in San Francisco last month, I happened upon a place that offers another take on this situation.

Our oolong teas were served in elegant gaiwans

Our oolong teas were served in elegant gaiwans

Samovar’s Tea Lounge, exclusive to San Francisco but with several locations throughout the city, offers seven “tea services”. Fittingly for San Francisco, known for its foodie culture, the tea services are pairings of delicately prepared food dishes and teas based on traditions from around the world. The seven tea services offered are: Moorish, English, Chinese, Japanese, Russian, Indian, and Palaeolithic (this theme is more for fun than authenticity!). So there is something to meet your needs whether you are in the mood for an Asian, Middle Eastern, or good old English-style tea experience…or all of the above!

If you can’t quite make up your mind you can always mix and match because they do also serve some of the dishes that appear in the tea services as separate appetizers. And, of course, you can also order any of their thirty-seven teas independently.

My tea companion and I opted to mix and match. We paired Middle Eastern appetizers with oolong teas, each selecting a different oolong. I opted for Baozhong oolong, a Taiwanese oolong with a fruity, floral undertone, while my companion chose a featured tea not listed on the menu—Aged Oolong. Both were exquisite, and our server had good (and accurate!) knowledge of the subtleties that differentiated the various oolongs we were considering. I was looking for a lighter, less oxidised oolong, while my companion prefers smokier teas (her favourite is Lapsang Souchong!) The Aged Oolong is roasted and more oxidised, which gives it something more akin to a smoky flavour. Dried, the Aged Oolong is a much darker colour than the green twists of the Baozhong oolong—black dragons indeed! When brewed, it produces a golden brown brew in comparison to the yellow-green brew of my less oxidised oolong. We had many chances to analyse the differences between our oolongs, as our teas were served in gaiwans accompanied by cast iron teapots full of hot water, which the waitstaff refilled without prompting (much appreciated!). This allowed us to appreciate the subtle ways in which the tea flavour changed over time as the leaves slowly opened up after multiple steepings.

While Samovar’s is a little pricey, this is actually a place that I think might be worth it for a special occasion. They have successfully created an atmosphere of calm, acceptance, and contemplation in which to enjoy your tea and enjoy the company of others; they fulfil their mission to connect you to the present moment and create positive human connections through tea.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

T Bar - Shui Xian Oolong tea in the cup

T Bar - Shui Xian Oolong tea in the cup

Carrying on my tearoom theme, I want to draw attention to another tearoom that I had the pleasure of visiting in Adelaide.  Tbar is a wonderful tea salon which, according to their website serves loose leaf tea with reverse osmosis water.  As I walked into the salon, I was faced with a wonderful array of loose lea tea, with enough variety to satisfy all types of tea drinkers.  After looking through the impressive display, I decided to take a seat and look at the tea menu.  It’s a beautifully presented menu with no shortage of tea puns as the reader is faced with teas such as diversi-t, visibili-t, prosperi-t.  Tea puns never fail to make me smile 🙂 

At the bottom of each page is a famous tea quote with my favourite being “Love and scandal are the best sweeteners of tea”.  I finally opted for a tea I haven’t tried for several years: a dark oolong known as Shui Xian (Water Sprite).  The tea was presented in the largest teacup and saucer I had ever seen but the tea was fabulous as the distinctive roasted aroma filled my nostrils as I poured the tea.

T Bar - Shui Xian Oolong escapes Tea Ball

T Bar - Shui Xian Oolong escapes Tea Ball

Now amongst the seasoned tea drinkers amongst us, I know that tea balls are not everyone’s cup of tea as there is nothing more pleasurable than witnessing the agony of the leaves. However the tea ball is convenient to many cafés and restaurants and I was just pleased that good quality loose leaf tea is readily available and has been at Tbar since 1999.

Back to the tea and whilst I couldn’t discern the spicy notes that Tbar describes is in the cup, the sweet, flowery lingering aftertaste clinged onto the side of my tongue making the experience truly memorable.

I momentarily released the leaves from their mesh ball prison, took in the aroma of the leaves and smiled as I tried my best not to overhear the ladies gossiping over their afternoon cuppa.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Ti Kuan Yin Slimming Oolong

Ti Kuan Yin Slimming Oolong

Name: Ti Kuan Yin Slimming Oolong

Brand: English Tea Store

Type: Oolong

Form: Loose leaf

Review: Mmm. . .Ti Kuan Yin, my favorite tea! Also known as “Iron Goddess of Mercy”, this Chinese oolong is a staple in the collections of many a tea lover. One of the things that I love most about this tea is that its flavors differ widely depending on its quality and how it is prepared. Some Ti Kuan Yins are highly roasted, resulting in a deep, nutty, roasted flavor while others are less processed, with sweet, floral flavors. There can also be a huge price difference between various Ti Kuan Yin oolongs, ranging from quite reasonable to very expensive.

The English Tea Store’s version of Ti Kuan Yin is reasonably priced, and while it doesn’t have the depth or subtlety of high-end Ti Kuan Yin, it remains a tasty option for sipping on a daily basis or even making into iced tea. Ti Kuan Yin Slimming Oolong’s dry leaf has a nutty, roasted nose, which brews into a light/medium bodied, gold liquor. It’s flavor is more nutty and mineral-ly rather than floral, making this a rich and assertive, if not terribly subtle, Ti Kuan Yin. Oolong newbies who want to try some “greener” oolongs may find this to be a good transition tea.

Preparation Suggestions: I like this Ti Kuan Yin brewed at a fairly high temperature: 195F or so. While high temperatures can sometimes kill floral flavors in Ti Kuan Yin, the English Tea Store’s version isn’t highly floral, and the heat actually enhances its mineral, nutty and roasted notes.

Serving Suggestions:  While Ti Kuan Yin is a wonderful tea for sipping on its own, I also enjoy it with many different types of food. Try it with vegetarian dishes, Asian foods and fish. Ti Kuan Yin also makes a superb iced tea, particularly if cold brewed overnight.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Steeping a great cuppa oolong in our house has just gotten easier. Hubby and I purchased a new tea mug with lid and infuser basket. The basket is for us the most interesting part of the set. We made a happy discovery almost as soon as we brought it home and unpacked it.

Awhile back I wrote that if you must use an infuser, you would get a better steeped tea by using one that is about as large as the cup’s interior. This gives you the wonderful steeping of loose leaves floating in the water coupled with the convenience of an infuser. You can steep your loose leaf tea, remove the infuser basket and leaves from the cup, and enjoy leaf-free tea. For that experiment, I used a small infuser basket that had come with my cast iron teapot. It was serviceable, but sometimes a bit larger cupful is required.

Happily, the infuser basket I had just purchased as part of that new tea mug was a perfect fit inside a white teacup I had. Time for a bit of a tea infusing experiment all over again!

First, to choose a tea. Oolong seemed a natural. For one thing, it’s perfect for multiple steepings. One of my favorite oolongs, with its smooth, slightly roasty, and soothing flavor, is Tie Kuan Yin Iron Goddess that I had the pleasure of trying a few months ago.

That was the hard part. Now, on with the easy part.

Hubby helped me with preparations (he put the infuser basket into the cup, very delicate work).

A spoonful of the dried leaves in the basket patiently awaited the water heated to 165-190° F.

I steeped the leaves for only 1 minute to keep the flavor light and assure more tasty cupfuls to come. The leaves did not unfold quite fully for this first steep, yet produced a delicious liquid.

The metal infuser basket gets rather hot, but I was able to remove it from the cup and set it aside without too much scorching of my fingertips. It was well worthwhile anyway. The tea was steeped perfectly. I sipped and enjoyed.

Now for the pièce de résistance — a second cuppa! More water was heated, the infuser and tea leaves were put back in the now-empty cup, and the steeping commenced anew. This time, the leaves opened up the rest of the way.

After another minute, I had a second perfectly steeped cuppa oolong, and the tea leaves, safely in the infuser basket, were easily removed and set aside for a possible third, fourth, and even fifth steeping.

You can do the same. Find an infuser and mug that fit together well, where the infuser is about the same size as the interior of the mug. Then, get some great tea that can be steeped two, three, or more times, and have a steeping good time. Enjoy!

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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© Online Stores, LLC, and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, LLC., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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