The way the tea leaves open up, unfurl, and move with the eddys and currents in your brewing vessel is known as the dance of the leaves. This is something you cannot truly appreciate when brewing with a tea bag, but the next time you are making a nice loose leaf green or white, watch the leaves and simply… relax.Brewing Tea
To experience the dance in its full effect, brew your next cup of tea in a glass teacup.  If you do not have glass teacups, you’d likely want to use a nice sturdy glass with no blemishes or imperfections  (which may lead to breakage) instead. Now add the desired amount of loose leaf tea to the bottom of the glass (green or white), and add water at around a 170 degree Fahrenheit temperature to the glass and enjoy the show.

You will see a secret life take place in your cup. The leaves perform their own ballet while they unfurl and steep. With glass brewing I’ve noticed, depending on how thin your glass is, you might wish to add some ice after a few minutes of steeping, or else wait quite awhile for the tea to cool down. Simply blow away the leaves remaining on top and filter them with your upper lip while sipping from the cup and you will have enjoyed the dance of the leaves, while making yourself a nice strong cup of tea.

Flowering Green TeaNow if you’re a bit squeamish about having loose leaves floating around in your glass, you can glass brew with a flowering tea. Flowering teas are even more of a show; they are simply an artisan produced ball of tea flowers that turn into a work of art in your glass. Flowering teas are great for parties, or just to have on display.When brewing a flowering tea, treat it like any other tea of that category. For instance, if you have a flowering green tea, brew it like any other loose leaf green tea, and so on.

Whether using loose leaf tea or flowering tea, the transformation the leaves undergo while brewing leads to a wholly enjoyable experience. Next time when you aren’t in a rush- sit back, relax,  and enjoy the dance of the leaves.

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