Keemun Panda (ETS image)

Keemun Panda (ETS image)

Sometimes a tea will surprise you. Not that this is necessarily a good thing. For me, at least, there have been good tea surprises and there have been bad ones. Obviously, I’d prefer the former but sometimes in this life we have to take the hand (or tea) we’re dealt.

I’ve learned to like Keemun over the years, a type of tea I didn’t care that much for at first. It’s a black tea from China that often has a hint of smokiness, something that I don’t normally like much in tea. But over time I’ve learned to like the more subtly smoky examples of this tea.

So I was mildly interested when a bunch of samples I was sent recently contained something that was described as a “superfine” Keemun. I was even more interested – in fact, quite intrigued – when I opened the package and was assaulted by the overwhelming aroma. And I mean that in a good way. I hastened to move this tea to the head of the stack of samples I’d been sent and steeped some right away.

And what a surprise it was. I wouldn’t say that it didn’t have any taste at all, but I’d venture to say that it came very close. I was less than impressed. I intend to give it another try just to make sure that I didn’t make a mistake while I was preparing it. But for now I’ll check this up to the “not very good surprise” category.

But there are also some good surprises when it comes to tea. As I’ve already suggested, one of my first steps in judging a tea is to simply open the package and evaluate the aroma of the dry leaves. There is generally a correlation between the smell of the leaves and the taste of the tea, except in such cases as noted above. The flip side of this are those rare good surprises when a bland smelling tea turns out to be a winner. It doesn’t happen often but that only serves to make it more surprising.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Advertisements