How small can you make a teapot? If you want one that can really serve as a server of tea, it needs to be able to hold some liquid. Otherwise, you can go a lot smaller.

http://garysthirdpotteryblog.blogspot.com/2014/02/tiny-teapots.html

Useable teeny teapot (a little over 1” long) by Gary Rith (screen capture from site)

Potter Gary Rith, just for the fun of it, created a couple of teeny teapots, one useable and one not. The useable one is a little over an inch long, holds about a teaspoon of tea liquid, and has a spout you can pour through. When designing these teeny teawares, you have to keep certain realities in mind, such as that spout. The ones shown on this site by Kelly Averill Savino are also functional despite their diminutive size. In fact, the teapot in its tiniest yet useable form seems to be of interest to potters these days. Sort of a challenge to their skills. Pinterest is full of more examples.

Tiny Tea Cup And Saucer Set with Teapot Creamer Sugar Bowl (screen capture from site)

Tiny Tea Cup And Saucer Set with Teapot Creamer Sugar Bowl (screen capture from site)

Entire teaware sets with teapots, trays, teacups, and saucers are readily available through only some sale sites like Etsy. This child’s tea set is a great example. Tiny teacups can range from barely able to hold a few drops to one holding about 2 ounces. Larger than that would be just a normal but small teacup. Finding tiny spoons for stirring that tiny amount of tea in those tiny teacups is another matter. I would recommend a toothpick – the flat kind.

Fortunately, your tea time treats can be normal sized for your mini-mini-tea party. In fact, you might want to have inverse proportions. That is, the smaller the teawares, the larger the scones and cakes and “biccies” (what we call cookies). You might have to serve them on tiny plates, though, like the ones shown here. I’m not sure how that will work out, but have fun giving it a try!

Tiny plates from Simplystella.com (screen capture from site)

Tiny plates from Simplystella.com (screen capture from site)

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

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