The versatility of this smoking method is endless. The salmon is spectacular but only one of many recipes that can be created using this tea smoking method. This is one recipe sure to stay in your repertoire.

Tea Smoked Salmon (photo by Janet Sanchez, all rights reserved)

Tea Smoked Salmon (photo by Janet Sanchez, all rights reserved)

1 cup Jasmine rice
¾ cup sugar
¾ cup Lapsang Souchong tea
1 ½ -2 lbs Salmon
1 tbsp kosher salt
1 tsp fresh ground black pepper
1 bundle fresh dill

Smoking device: an Asian bamboo steamer over a foil-lined pan was used, but a smoking device can be made from a variety of different kitchen tools. The basics are; a perforated pan(bamboo steamer, pasta strainer) that can sit on top of the pot, a pot or pan at least 4 inches deep roughly the same diameter as the perforated pan. On a side note of using a pan that is perforated up the side of the pan, tightly wrap the sides with foil and secure in place. A lid to fit the top of the perforated pan is needed as well. Also needed is a piece of foil large enough to completely line the inside of the pot or pan being used.

Smoker directions: Completely line the bottom and sides of the pot with foil. Mix together the rice, sugar and tea. Place the mixture in the bottom of the foil lined pan. Place the perforated vessel on top of the pan. Make sure that it fits so the smoke goes into the fish not outside of the pan. Place a bed of dill onto the perforated pan reserving a few sprigs for the top of the fish. Liberally season both the skin side and top side of the fish with salt and pepper. You many not need to use all of the salt and pepper depending on the surface size of the fish. Place the reserved sprigs of dill on top. Cover the perforated pan with the lid. Place the smoking device over medium heat for about 5 minutes or until smoke is visible. Once smoke is visible reduce heat to medium low or low and look for 15-20 minutes or desired doneness.

This method of tea smoking can be used on any meat as well as vegetables. Simply change out the seasoning to fit whatever protein or vegetable being used.

See more of Janet Sanchez’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Advertisements