National Boss’s Day is upon us, so it’s time to celebrate your boss with tea. Of course, some of you might not feel like celebrating. Bosses get a bad rap, sometimes deservedly. I’ve had some lulus over the years, but the ones that were good and from whom I learned a lot are the ones I celebrate today. And if you know any like that, I hope you take time to celebrate them, too.

One option: Queen Victorias Swiss Cottage at Osborne House on the Isle Of Wight (Screen capture from site)

One option: Queen Victorias Swiss Cottage at Osborne House on the Isle Of Wight (Screen capture from site)

What Is Boss’s Day?

This day, celebrated on October 16 in the United States, Canada and Lithuania, is when employees thank their bosses for being kind and fair throughout the year, strengthening the bond between employer and employee. The day has become somewhat controversial since it’s start in 1958 but is still increasingly popular. The originator was Patricia Bays Haroski who believed that young employees sometimes did not understand the hard work and dedication that their supervisors put into their work and the challenges they faced to do so. The day is now also celebrated (but not necessarily on the same date as the U.S.) in countries such as Australia, India, Ireland, and Egypt. The usual observation is to give a greeting card or other small token of appreciation.

A Tea Time for Your Boss

For those bosses who encourage you, take you under their wing, help you learn and grow in your job, understand the need now and then to attend to personal matters, and otherwise treat you with a certain degree of dignity and respect, you can repay a bit of that by treating them to a special tea time. Frankly, I’d recommend going to a local tea room. Whether your boss is male or female, young or old, dressed in a suit or that office casual look or even a set of Dickie’s, getting them away from the work environment for a little while will help them relax and unwind. In today’s business climate, that’s a very good thing to do.

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