By A.C. Cargill

Here’s a way to enhance your enjoyment of tea: write a poem or two about it. My exploration into the online community of tea lovers, sellers, drinkers, aficionados, experts, gurus, etc., has been a real eye-opener. Not only are there lots of us, but there are many so devoted to tea that they write poems about it. I’m one of them, although I tend to be a bit old-fashioned, i.e., my poems not only rhyme but they actually make sense.

A short sample:

“Brew” – “steep” – “infuse”
Terms that confuse
What each does mean
Is yet to be seen

Okay, not exactly Shakespeare. How about this one:

Darjeeling
Is so darling
And called “champagne of teas

With taste so fine
’Tis true divine
And tastebuds sure to please

Alright, alright, I’ll stop now — promise!

My poetry writing began in grade school. In Junior High, I had a poem published in a national anthology (lost my copy decades ago — I used to move a lot). In High School, I continued writing, experimenting with more freeform styles. After graduating from college, my attention turned to other areas of creativity. Recently, however, I find myself drawn back to writing poetry with hubby encouraging me to combine that with my growing fascination with tea. Thus, my tea poetry came into being. So far, I’m up to about 150.

Want to join in the fun? Trying writing something on a tea topic such as these:

  • Tea growers and row upon row of Camellia Sinensis plants blanketing the hills with their bright green buds and new, tender leaves ready for harvest.
  • Processing those leaves into the form that tea blenders and vendors use to create their special teas.
  • The people who sell those teas and the people who buy them.
  • The tea experience: tea parties, preparing tea, the foods that make the tea experience complete, all of the special tea moments both alone and with your special someone.

These should give you a start. The more you learn about tea, the more poem ideas will pop into your head. Your poetic endeavors can also include trying various forms such as haikus and sonnets (sometimes having a set structure can make writing easier). Having a topic (tea) to focus on also helps. You can write either about facts about tea, a life event that includes tea, or a fantasy on a tea moment.

I can’t begin to say how satisfying all of this has been for me and hope that you, too, will find some such outlet and a focus. Best wishes in your hunt, and let me know how it’s going. Enjoy!

Writing “tea poetry” is just another part of living the “tea life,” folks! Check out A.C.’s blog, Tea Time with A.C. Cargill, to learn more!

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