“A Popular Treatise on Tea” by John Sumner

If you head out to the Internet looking for tea books from yesteryear, you'll find enough to keep you occupied for a very long time. I've written about quite a few such works in these very pages, but to the best of my recall I can't think of one that was written by an author …

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Forgetting to Time Your Tea

Forgetfulness is not the exclusive province of the elderly. At least that’s what I keep telling myself, and thus am assured that being forgetful is not a sign of being over the hill. Many people — even some decades younger than me — forget things due to their busy lives, including attending to their children. …

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Jasmine Tea Roundup

Jasmine teas fall into what the tea experts call “scented” teas. I just call them “flavored” teas, since items used to create the scents usually affect both aroma and flavor. Whether you call it “flavored” or “scented,” jasmine tea has been around a long while, starting some time during the Song Dynasty in China (960-1279). …

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Diving Into the World of Yixing Teapots — Part 3

Part 1 gave you some idea what Yixing teapots were all about while Part 2 showed how to prepare your teapots for use. It’s finally time to start actually steeping tea in your teapot to drink and enjoy! The First Drinkable Potful — Once the teapots were ready for use, hubby and I selected one …

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Tea Pioneers of Great Britain

The British were not the first people to drink tea and they were not even the first Europeans to do so. They have never grown tea on their own soil, except in very modest amounts at one or two plantations, nor do they drink the most tea on a per capita basis. And yet when …

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Diving Into the World of Yixing Teapots — Part 2

When you first dive into the world of Yixing (“Ee-sheeng” or “Yee-sheeng”)  teapots, you need to be sure to get the real deal and a good deal (see Part 1). That accomplished, you are then faced with the scary question: “Now what?” To that end, I spent several days after our three teapots arrived on …

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Diving Into the World of Yixing Teapots — Part 1

Some of the most treasured teawares are made from a special clay called “zisha” by artisans who train for years. The clay and the best artisans are from the province of China called “Yixing” (pronounced “Ee-sheeng” or “Yee-sheeng”). I have always been a bit leery of taking the plunge and buying one or more of …

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Profiles in Tea: Queen Marie of Romania

The story of how a British princess brought tea to Romania begins in 1874 when Queen Victoria’s son Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, married the daughter of Russia’s Tsar Alexander. The duke and duchess’ eldest daughter, Marie, was born a year later. A bright, free-spirited girl, Marie was blessed with exceptional beauty and was gifted with …

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It’s Steep Off Time — Two Teapots Go Spout to Spout

Keeping the peace among the teapots in my bevy can be a bit tricky. One teapot tends to get a bit envious when another teapot gets to steep a particularly special tea. They also can develop a competitive instinct, challenging each other to steep offs. It’s my fault, probably. I tend to favor some teapots …

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Honeybush: The Other Red “Tea”

There's no such thing as red tea, at least not in the strictest sense of the word. But there are some beverages that have come to be referred to as "red tea" over the years and will probably continue to be referred to as such by anyone but the most exacting sticklers for accuracy. Take …

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