Scottish Breakfast Tea (ETS image)

Scottish Breakfast Tea (ETS image)

As most of us are probably aware, they drink their fair share of tea in the United Kingdom, where the Irish are counted among the world’s top tea drinkers. UK tea drinkers are said to put away about 165 million cups of tea each and every day. The Scottish drink a good bit of tea too, and they even have a blend named for them. Scottish Breakfast is a variation on more popular blends such as English Breakfast and Irish Breakfast.

One thing they don’t do much of in the UK is grow tea. As I’ve noted before, if they had to get by on the tea they grew in this particular part of the world, they wouldn’t be drinking much tea. The notable exception to all of this is the Cornwall-based Tregothnan Estate. They’ve been growing tea there for a while now and are finally producing a notable amount. But even though it measures in the tons, it’s still nothing more than a drop in the bucket when it comes to the UK’s tea drinking needs. Read more about Tregothnan in the various articles that have appeared at this site previously.

But, as a popular song once put it, there’s a new kid in town. To be more precise, that’s the Highland Perthshire region of Scotland, where the appropriately named Wee Tea Company is, as one of their founders put it, “on a mission to produce truly local tea.” While it’s questionable how much local tea they’re going to turn out the mission is underway nonetheless.

The climate in this region of Scotland isn’t quite like what tea plants experience in the mellower climes of tea-growing regions like Asia and Africa. But things seem to be going rather well so far at the plantation, where there are already some 2,000 plants in the ground. If things go well it seems that some of this homegrown tea may be making to drinkers’ cups sometime in 2015.

While you’re waiting to taste your first cup of Scottish-grown tea, you can read more about the effort in this article from the BBC and this one from the company’s own web site.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

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