A supermodel designing teacups? Well, sorta. Might just go to show that Miranda Kerr is more than another pretty face. An angelic face at that (she is a former Victoria’s Secret Angel model). Her designs, manufactured by the renowned pottery firm of Royal Albert, were unveiled in Sydney, Australia, on May 16th. The designs featured a variety of pastel shades with butterfly and floral prints. Sorry, no angels in skimpy underwear.

Royal Albert Teacup Designs for Miranda Kerr (Screen capture from site)

Royal Albert Teacup Designs for Miranda Kerr (Screen capture from site)

The Australian-born supermodel is now 31 years old and obviously looking to branch out into other venues than just modeling. Teacup designs seem a good option. She worked with designers at Royal Albert to come up with something that she is now happy to have her name on. A fairly typical arrangement where the celebrity is usually just an endorser of, rather than an actual designer of, the product. As the Royal Albert Web site states, Miranda brings “catwalk glamour to afternoon tea” (meaning this is basically a celebrity endorsement, not her own actual designs). Flowers that look like peonies but could be roses in shades of pink, purple butterflies on pastel aqua backgrounds, and other delicate designs are hallmarks of the collection. And of course they are true to the Royal Albert standard of quality.

Founded around 1896 by Thomas Clark Wild in Longton, Stoke-on-Trent, England, and trading under the name “Royal Albert,” the company specialized in creating bone china tea and breakfast sets with a high frill appeal. The name “Royal Albert” refers to Prince Albert who became King George VI in 1936 when his brother Edward abdicated to be with Mrs. Wallis Simpson after her divorce. China produced at the factory was initially branded as “Albert Crown China” with “Royal” being added in 1904 and soon becoming known simply as “Royal Albert.”

They have hundreds of patterns, many of which are classics. Only time will tell if this “supermodel edition” will be one of them. One thing is for sure: the appeal for the more dainty tea tables out there is undeniable.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

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