I certainly don’t have the space in these monthly gadget reports to report on 27 gadgets. So I’ll start this installment by referring you to an article that does. It’s called 27 Items All Tea Lovers Need In Their Lives. A few of which might look familiar to anyone who reads this column. I could question whether anyone really needs a teapot with multiple spouts, teacup rings or lace doilies made of sugar, but then who am I to judge?

The Cookie Catcher is a rather memorable gadget and even though you could use it with the likes of coffee, cocoa, or even milk it seems very well suited to tea. I’m not much for dunking cookies and other edible items in my tea. But for those who like this sort of thing the Cookie Catcher seems like a good solution for how to deal with the problem of crumbs dislodging themselves from your dunkables.

Catch some cookies like these with that gadget! (ETS image)

Catch some cookies like these with that gadget! (ETS image)

Speaking of memorable tea gadgets, I rarely let an edition of this report pass without making mention of a great novelty tea infuser and this edition is surely no exception. So, with no further ado, here’s a monkey tea infuser that clasps onto the rim of your teacup and does his infusing thing. Our final gadget this time around is one that answers that age old question – what happens when a slingshot meets your hot tea? Actually, I don’t think this one’s a slingshot at all, but just a humorous speculation on what one might do with a unique tea cup that we’ve reported on before.

We’ve noted in these pages before that tea can be used in a seemingly endless variety of dishes. Which are perhaps limited only by the imagination. One of the uses that I personally had never imagined before was in kimchi, a popular Korean delicacy made of fermented vegetables. As the patent application notes, “The kimchi containing puerh tea leaves does not undergo flavor changes, such as souring, and texture degradation. In addition, the puerh tea leaves in the kimchi remove off-flavors produced during fermentation, thereby maintaining fresh and mild taste of the kimchi.”

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

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