You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Pu-erh’ tag.

Young Pu-erh – great straight or “British style” (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Young Pu-erh – great straight or “British style” (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

A few years ago I received a sample of a tea called “Young Pu-erh.” It started me on an exploration of this rather unique style of tea. It’s not a black tea nor an oolong. And it’s certainly not a green or white tea. So, what is Young Pu-erh all about? To know that, you need to know more about pu-erh.

The Official Description

In 2008 pu-erh was granted a geographical designation by the Chinese government at the request of the tea farmers and factory owners in Yunnan province. Standard Number GB/T 22111-2008 “Product of geographical indication – Puer tea” (pu-erh has several spellings in our alphabet with lots of discussion about which should be the standard). As of 1 December 2008, only tea grown and processed in Yunnan province could be labeled as pu-erh tea, and it must be made from a large leaf variety of the tea plant (Camellia sinensis var. assamica) and processed using a specified methodology. Why bother? Because at that time prices were sky high. Shortly after (or possibly just before) this standard went into full effect, the pu-erh market was experiencing a pricing bubble that popped. Prices fell about 85% but in the past few years have been climbing back up. Fakery abounded before the standard (and the big price drop) and still does. Tea leaves were being gathered from wherever they could be gotten and processed haphazardly into cakes to sell to unsuspecting customers (mostly outside of China). The overall reputation of the tea was being threatened, as it was with Darjeeling teas which were being blended with inferior teas to spread out the supply and meet demand.

What Makes Pu-erh Different

This is a greatly simplified version. The tea leaves undergo the basic processing of tea leaves according to the final style of pu-erh desired. This involves withering, rolling, drying, etc. The result is called máochá (leaves that can be stored awhile under proper conditions before final processing or be processed right away). From here there are two different options: wo dui (wet pile fermentation) that speeds up aging of the tea (actually a form of fermentation but one that does not create alcohol) and is called shu, shou, cooked, or ripe pu-erh; and natural fermentation where the leaves are wetted slightly, pressed into various shapes (discs, mushrooms, tuos, bricks, and mini-tuos), then stored in certain conditions (humidity level, temperature, and monitoring periodically) for at least 5 years, and is called sheng, uncooked, or raw pu-erh.

Description of The English Tea Store’s Young Pu-erh

This is basically a shu (cooked, ripe) pu-erh. It has an aroma described in various ways, depending on whether the describer finds it pleasant or not. To me it’s earthy like a forest with lots of leaves on the ground. Some call it mushroom-like. Others say it’s like rotting vegetation. The steeping instructions said it can be infused using water heated to a rolling boil for 2-10 minutes. So of course, hubby and I had to try it infused using different times. We also tried it straight but also “British style” with milk and sweetener (and probably made a few pu-erh lovers faint – they tend to take this tea quite seriously, while I like to keep a bit of humor and the joy of experimentation in things). Both ways were quite satisfying for us. And you can feel confident that whichever way you prefer it will be fine. There are no rules in tea – only options!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Once upon a time there was tea. It was black – for the most part. It was a time, here in the West, when tea and black tea were nearly synonymous. But in the last decade or so it’s green tea that’s grabbed the overwhelming share of attention.

With the popularity of green tea there’s also been a search for the next big thing in tea – a search that has turned up the likes of white tea, oolong, and even puerh. The latter is a type of tea that’s not known to most people and isn’t even known to many tea drinkers.

Pu-erhs to consider, with flavored versions becoming more popular. (ETS Image)

Pu-erhs to consider, with flavored versions becoming more popular. (ETS Image)

The super-condensed version of what puerh is: a type of tea that’s produced in Yunnan, China, and that’s notable for being fermented after the processing stages. If you do even a cursory scan of the web, you could be forgiven for believing that puerh is something of a magic elixir brimming over with health benefits.

What you’ll also notice is that a lot of those making claims for puerh seem to have a horse in the race, as the saying goes. Which is to say a lot of the claims for puerh’s benefits come from merchants who are keen to sell you…puerh tea. Which is an easy enough claim to make about a type of tea that’s considered to be rather exotic.

But is there any truth to the health claims made for puerh tea? This is no place for an in-depth study, but we’ll look at a few of them. Though it’s also worth considering whether any benefits said to arise from puerh have to do with puerh specifically or tea in general.

As the popular Dr. Andrew Weil notes at his web site, some of the claims made for puerh are “promotion of weight loss, reduction of serum cholesterol, and cardiovascular protection.” However, he goes on to claim, “not many scientific studies exist on pu-erh tea, so we don’t know how valid these health claims are. Some research suggests that pu-erh may help lower cholesterol and reduce heart disease risk, but this hasn’t been confirmed in humans.” An article at one major city paper echoes some of these claims and references a 2009 Chinese study that indicates that puerh lowers cholesterol. It also points to a 2011 study that suggests that puerh can inhibit tumor growth.

As for those claims regarding puerh and weight loss, there are actually several studies that have looked at this topic. All were carried out by Chinese researchers, not surprisingly. This one used rats as subjects and suggested that puerh might have some benefits with regard to weight loss and cholesterol reduction.

This study used puerh extract and human subjects and claimed a slight reduction in weight over a three-month period, but no significant reduction in cholesterol. Here’s a study that summarizes “current progress on understanding the mechanisms and bioactive components of Pu-erh’s weight-cutting effects as well as highlighting current weaknesses in the field.” Last up, a study that compares antioxidant content of puerh and various other teas and finds that it compares favorably.

Which is just a brief look at a topic that probably merits a closer look. It also merits at least a tiny bit of healthy skepticism. But that’s probably true any time health claims are being made for foods or beverages.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

C Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

There are black teas (what many in the world call “red tea”), green teas, white teas, rarer yellow teas, purple teas, hundreds of oolong teas … and then there’s pu-erh. Strange. Mysterious. Off-putting. But, as with anything new to you, starting out is easy – just take that first step. Here is a pu-erh (or two) that can get you started. But first, a little about what pu-erh tea is.

Don’t let the dark color fool you. The tea has no bitterness or astringency and can be drank as is or with sweetener – even milk! (Photos by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Don’t let the dark color fool you. The tea has no bitterness or astringency and can be drank as is or with sweetener – even milk! (Photos by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

The Basics of Pu-erh

This is strictly bare-bones information. Just enough to give you an overall understanding of this style of tea. The tea leaves are those from the tea bush (Camellia Sinensis) and tend to be of a more sturdy nature (but not always). They are grown in the Yunnan Province of China (the regions of Simao, Xishuangbanna, Boshan, and Lincang). There are white, green, and black pu-erhs, described as follows:

  • White Pu-erh – This is called “bud” and “silver tips” pu-erh and is made entirely from the highest quality uppermost tender buds of the tea plant gathered exclusively by hand in Spring.
  • Green Pu-erh – This is called “raw,” “uncooked,” or “sheng” pu-erh. There is a young version that has not completely fermented and an aged version that has undergone a complete fermentation through dry storage, usually for 5 years or more.
  • Black Pu-erh – This is the true “black tea” (aka “shou,” “ripe,” or “cooked” pu-erh) and dates from the 1970s. It is a way to mimic aged green pu-erh to meet market demand. The most important difference is Wo Dui (a Chinese fermentation process used for this style of tea) where temperatures are strictly controlled and humidity is kept high to break down the natural structure of young tea leaves to remove bitterness and unwanted flavors.

Still with me? Good. At this point, I would say that which of these you start out with would depend on your overall tea preferences. If you drink mostly regular green tea, then go for a green pu-erh with a few years of aging to remove some of the bitterness, for example. However, being of a more…uh, well, not really pushy…more like “helpful” nature, I can’t resist passing along the recommendations below.

A Pu-erh to Start You Out

My first recommendation is that you start with a loose version of pu-erh, not the kind pressed into cakes (beengs), bricks, or mini cakes (“tuochas”). Otherwise you might quickly get frustrated by trying to chop some off to put in your steeping vessel (often a gaiwan or Yixing teapot – see more info on these in my articles: part 1, part 2, and part 3). The other benefit is that you get to play around with blending the loose tea with other loose teas you may have on hand. Keemun and Assam are a couple of black teas to try blending with the pu-erh. It will reduce what some find to be the unpleasant side of pu-erh – what they call that “dirt” taste.

One to try: Golden Pu-erh Loose Leaf Tea is aged for 5 years deep in the mountain caves of Yunnan, China. The flavor has musty, elemental notes. The leaves have a wonderful aroma that is earthy yet sweet, very nice. The instructions say to steep 2-10 minutes in water that has been brought to a rolling boil. I recommend starting with 2 minutes, adding 30 seconds for each subsequent infusion of the tea leaves (you can infuse the leaves several times). The first infusion will be fairly light, with the following infusions being darker, a bit earthy, and yet caramelly without bitterness.

If you’re really adventurous, you might try my own recipe for a chocolaty version of this tea: Tea Experiment — “Mocha” Pu-erh.

There is also a version of this tea with caramel added to enhance the natural caramelly flavor. See my review.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Pu-erh tea disc – rounded on one side and indented on the other

Pu-erh tea disc – rounded on one side and indented on the other

Just as there is a wide difference between bagged teas, the variety of pu-erh (puer, pu’er) tea cakes on the market is fairly astounding. Considering that some pu-erhs are considered collectibles, fakery has also come about. Knowing what to look for and how to make your selection is more important than ever.

Type of Tea Used in Pu-erh Cakes

Green. Black. White. Raw. Cooked. Uncooked. Whatever way they’re prepared, the leaves are those from the tea bush (Camellia Sinensis) and grown in the Yunnan Province of China (the regions of Simao, Xishuangbanna, Boshan, and Lincang) and can be traced back to the Eastern Han Dynasty (25-220 AD). Over the years pu-erh has been traded and used in bartering for goods, with the best being reserved for the Chinese Emperor. The popularity and high prices of older pu-erhs has resulted in truckloads of cheap green teas from nearby provinces being sneaked into the Yunnan area to be processed into tea cakes and sold as pu-erhs. The inferior quality of the tea leaves, though, results in a decidedly inferior tea.

Some Pu-erh Tea Cake Shapes

It’s not a rotted pumpkin. It’s a pu-erh tea cake!

It’s not a rotted pumpkin. It’s a pu-erh tea cake!

It seems that the most common pu-erh tea cake shape is a disc about the same size as a frisbee. These are usually slightly rounded on the “top” side and have an indent on the “back” side. They are wrapped in paper in a neat pattern that fits the round shape, with the paper ends being tucked into that indent. Each tea vendor has their own printed labels and will mark on that label the year the cake was created.

Other popular shapes are bing (beeng) chas, tuochas, mushrooms, and bricks. You can also buy pu-erh in loose form, though some experts claim the flavor lacks the distinctive quality for which pu-erhs are known. There are also some that to me look like pumpkins or melons and others shaped into balls between the size of a baseball and a volleyball.

Brick tea cakes designs

Brick tea cakes designs

Some Things to Look Out for

Check the wrapping to make sure it is intact before you open it. Since the tea leaves are steamed and then pressed into the cake and brick shapes, mold (in the form of odd, discolored spots and downy or furry coatings) is a key issue. Insect infestations are another common problem, and are evidenced by small holes or big cracks with fine dust particles in them. Both issues are caused by improper storage. The smell of bad pu-erh tea is usually moldy, rotten, and pungent with a sour undertone and off taste notes.

Older tea cakes may be naturally loose due to high oxidation and expansion of internal air pockets. The fake tea cakes that are supposed to be older may appear old but will be hard and compact. True older cakes will pry apart easily.

Pu-erh cakes are so special that they are often displayed in shop windows and on vendor sites on stands

Pu-erh cakes are so special that they are often displayed in shop windows and on vendor sites on stands

Another issue shows up after steeping some of the leaves. Look for signs of decomposition resulting from high levels of bacteria that cause rapid decay. Also, the taste of a true pu-erh tea cake will be complex, ranging from lightly floral, heather, fruity, and honey-like to leather, harsh peat, tobacco, organics, wood, grass, and deep earth.

Award-winning Designs

Pu-erh has been around awhile, so you wouldn’t think there’d be all that much new when it comes to tea cake shapes and packaging, right? Well, actually, a tea vendor recently won several awards at the World Tea Expo for just that. They were judged “Best New Product 2012” for tea cakes shaped and wrapped like chocolate candy bars where you can snap off a single-serving section of tea leaves, and for tea balls (about 1” in diameter) in a bamboo canister, and finally for single-serving size discs in what looks like a Tootsie Roll wrapper. The innovation never ends!

Bottom Line

More and more, loose versions of Pu-erhs are available.

More and more, loose versions of Pu-erhs are available.

Yes, pu-erh tea cakes are not created equal, but with the right knowledge, you can make a wise choice!

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Pu-erh is one of those teas that can take multiple infusions and is often infused in smaller amounts. A lot of pu-erh is sold in large cakes where you have to break off a chunk to steep it. Some is sold in mini cakes (“tuochas”), which are sized about right for a small pot of tea. Recently, though, pu-erh has become available loose and even in teabags. For many of you, buying pu-erh loose in a pouch or tin may not seem kosher. However, the era of buying big cakes may be fading, especially as pu-erh gets more known and liked among tea drinkers — both veterans and newbies alike.

Golden Pu-erh Tea

Golden Pu-erh Tea

I’ve been taking a pretty unorthodox approach to pu-erh, steeping longer than usual times, adding in cocoa powder, etc. So, steeping a loose pu-erh is right up my alley. Golden Pu-erh Loose Leaf Tea is one I tried a few months ago, with satisfying results.

We opened the wonderful plastic pouch and took a moment to smell the tea leaves, which were large pieces and had an aroma that was earthy yet sweet, not the damp half-composted leaves on the forest floor aroma of some other pu-erhs we have tried (not a bad aroma – just pointing out that this one is different).

Some people do a quick rinse of the leaves (about 30 seconds) and then dump out the liquid, but we chose not to. This meant that the first steep was more of a preparatory steep but was still drinkable. The liquid color was a dark reddish brown with an aroma that was earthy yet caramelly and a taste that was smooth and earthy with no bitterness. The second steep was the best, with a richness that the first one didn’t have yet still smooth and free of bitterness. The third and fourth steeps were both lighter overall, with the third having a gritty quality to the flavor (though not to the mouth feel) and the fourth being pretty faint in both color and flavor.

Not a bad yield, and one that makes the price per cup quite reasonable (18.75 cents per cupful as of the writing of this article).

Be wild. Be experimental. Go for some Golden Pu-erh!

See also:
The Mysterious World of Aged Pu-erh Tea
The Possibilities of Young Pu-erh Tea
Tea Experiment — “Mocha” Pu-erh
Pu-erh Roundup
A Touch of Pu-erh
Review — The English Tea Store’s Scottish Caramel Coffee Pu-Erh
Pu-erh Tea

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Scottish Caramel Toffee Pu-erh

Scottish Caramel Toffee Pu-erh

Name: Scottish Caramel Toffee Pu-erh

Brand: English Tea Store

Type: Pu-erh, flavored

Form: Loose leaf

Review: I do confess that I don’t normally think of Scotland and pu-erh as having any sort of natural connection to each other, though perhaps that is due to a lack of imagination on my part. I’m glad, though, that someone was creative enough to create this blend of toffee pieces and shou (ripe) pu-erh tea, which I find very tasty indeed. The tea is priced right and can be infused more than once, making it a very good value indeed.

This isn’t a particularly sophisticated flavored tea and it doesn’t have a lot of depth or complexity. It is, however, an inspired flavor combination (kind of like peanut butter and chocolate). As the English Tea Store notes in its product description, the earthiness of pu-erh is actually a good match to the sweetness of toffee. The liquor is very dark brown, as is typical for a shou pu-erh, and medium bodied. For many people, this might be an acceptable coffee alternative, particularly if they are partial to flavored coffees.

Preparation Tips: I recommend 1.5 teaspoons of leaf to eight ounces of boiling water. A three minute steep worked well for me, but if you like a more aggressive flavor, up the steep time to five minutes. It tastes plenty sweet to me, but you may want to add some additional sweetening, as well as a bit of  milk, for a more decadent cup. Scottish Caramel Toffee Pu-Erh is also good for more than one steep: I’d recommend upping the steep time 1-2 minutes for each successive infusion.

Serving Tips:  There is no reason to serve this with food: It is flavorful enough on its own and would probably conflict with the flavor of most foodstuffs anyway. Save this tea for dessert or as a substitute for  a sweet breakfast pastry.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Have you ever seen a brick of tea? It is tea leaves that have been packed into molds and pressed into a square or rectangle (or maybe a disk).  In ancient times the tea bricks could be used as a form of currency.  You can still buy tea in this form, usually Pu-erh tea.

Bricks of tea were more practical for transporting  by caravan on the ancient tea routes.  They took up less space than loose tea and after being cured, dried and aged, the bricks were less susceptible to damage.

In Tibet the people still use brick tea to prepare a beverage called butter tea, which is an essential part of their daily life.  It includes yak butter, brick tea and salt.  They drink several bowls of this tea before starting their work day.  I can only imagine what this tastes like and I’m not about to try adding butter and salt to my PG Tips anytime soon.

If you would like to try brick tea, you can buy Pu-erh (poo-urr) from many online sources.  It comes from the Yunnan Province in China.  It is the only tea which is intentionally aged.  In some cases a rare Pu-erh can be up to thirty years old.  You can expect to pay a premium price for these special teas.

The aging process is supposed to produce a rich and smooth taste.  I think of it as an acquired taste, but perhaps the quality of the tea I sampled was not up to par.  It definitely has a bold, earthy taste.  A little too earthy for my palate.

Tea bricks can be quite ornate and beautiful.  Many have intricate landscape scenes or geometric designs.  They make interesting gifts for your tea enthusiast friends, who may enjoy putting them on display.  Or you might like a simpler brick form that is meant to be brewed and consumed.  Any way you look at it, tea bricks hold a fascinating place in the world of tea.

Don’t forget to check the parTEA lady’s blog, Tea and Talk!

[Editor’s note: Our blog is chock full of great articles on this topic. Use our search feature to find them!]

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Golden Moon Pu-erhName: Pu-Erh

Brand: Golden Moon

Type: Pu-Erh, shu/cooked

Form: Loose leaf

Review: Pu-Erh is perhaps best described as an “acquired taste”. Processed differently than most teas, it doesn’t taste much like the way we think tea ought to taste. Still, it can be quite delicious, as Golden Moon’s Pu-Erhproves.

While pu-erh is often sold packed in bricks, bowls, and cakes, this pu-erh is sold loose. It is a shu or “cooked” pu-erh, processed to mimic the effects of a long fermentation period. The tea has a light, sweet, spicy nose, and infuses to the characteristic red-orange liquor of cooked pu-erh.

Many cooked pu-erhs boast a strong nose, and taste, of the barnyard, both of which are quite absent in this tea. Instead, it possesses a deep, sweet spiciness, reminding me of nutmeg, cinnamon and clove (think spice cake). Only at the finish does this full-bodied tea develop a decidedly earthy quality.

Recommendation: If you are a serious pu-erh fan, this tea may be too mild for you. Golden Moon clearly selected it for the uninitiated, which is probably a good thing, but it doesn’t pack the punch that many serious pu-erh drinkers like. But pu-erh newbies should like this one, as should anyone who is fond of sweet, spicy teas that have a great deal of staying power.

Preparation Tips: It is possible to get many, many steeps from pu’erh, particularly if prepared in a tiny gong-fu teapot with lots of leaf and not a lot of water. Boiling water is fine for this tea, and it’s pretty forgiving when it comes to steep times.

Food Pairing Tips: I am not fond of serving pu-erh with food, but this tea actually goes well with slightly sweet cakes, cookies, and snacks. I enjoyed a pot of this with a lightly sweetened pumpkin-seed energy bar, and the flavors meshed beautifully.

[Editor’s note: Our blog is chock full of great articles on this topic. Use our search feature to find them!]

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

By Stephanie Harkins [reposted from our sister blog]

Ti Kuan Yin Oolong

Ti Kuan Yin Oolong

The Gongfu tea ceremony, also known as the Kungfu tea ceremony, literally means “Way of tea brewing with great skill”. The ceremony itself a Chinese method of brewing teas. Usually Oolong tea, which is a type of tea between green and black tea, or Pu-erh tea, which is an earthy and pungent tea, are the teas that are brewed Gongfu style. Unlike the Japanese tea ceremonies which focus on traditional gestures and hand movements, the Chinese Gongfu ceremony focus is on the quality of the brewed tea.

To brew your tea in this manner, first you must have all the appropriate accessories. A Yixing clay teapot is necessary, which contains a special type of clay called “Zisha” which absorbs tiny amounts of the teas with each use, and after prolonged use, the teapot takes on the flavor of the teas. Along with your teapot, you will need 3 small (30 ml) teacups, as well as fresh filtered water. A kettle for boiling the water will be required, and a container to dispense water, a tray for catching the water or tea as it is poured, and a clean cloth to wipe up any spills.

Once you have all the necessary equipment, you must find a good space to hold your tea ceremony. Ideally this would be spacious, peaceful and relaxing. Incense, flowers and traditional music can help to enhance your environment.

The first stage of the ceremony involves preparing and warming the teapot and cups by laying them out and warming as well as sterilizing by rinsing with hot water, then pouring that water away. The second stage is for appreciation of the tea itself, where the people partaking in the ceremony inspect the tea to be brewed for aroma and appearance. In the next part of the ceremony, the tea leaves are placed into the teapot.

Next, the tea leaves are “rinsed” using a technique called “Rinsing from an elevated pot”. You do this by placing the clay teapot into the water-catching bowl, then pour water at the appropriate temperature into the teapot from an elevated position until the pot overflows. Water heated to the appropriate temperature for the tea is then poured into the pot until the pot overflows then any debris or bubbles are gently removed to keep the tea from touching the mouth of the pot which you cover with the lid.

Some people suggest that this tea should then be steeped shortly then poured out. Other people suggest immediately pouring the first tea leaf brew into the cups without allowing it to steep. This first brewing is known as “A row of clouds, running water”, which is essentially performed to rinse the tea leaves. After rinsing the leaves, the pot is refilled with water poured from a low height. Then the hot tea from the first brew is poured over the outside of the teapot before serving the tea to guests in an even manner around the table. Usually the tea leaves being used are good for 4-5 steepings!

Finally the Gongfu ceremony ends by placing the used tea leaves into a clean, clear bowl for all guests to inspect and appreciate.

Stephanie publishes the Tea Review Blog.

Categories

Explore our content:

Find us on these sites:


Follow Us!     Like Us!     Follow Us!     Follow Us!     Plus 1 Us!
Follow Tea Blog on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Tweet This!    add to del.icio.us    add to furl    digg this    stumble it!    add to simpy    seed the vine    add to reddit     post to facebook    technorati faves

Copyright Notice:

© Online Stores, LLC, and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, LLC., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Blog Affiliates

blogged
Bloglisting.net - The internets fastest growing blog directory

Networked Blogs

%d bloggers like this: