Teapot Museums

By William I. Lengeman III

Nowadays there are any number of ways to prepare a cup of tea. But one of the most time-honored and popular methods is that old standby – hot water, tea and a teapot. Many teapots are simple devices, but many others are impressive works of art in their own right.

Teapot

If you’d like to look at teapots up close, you might be in luck, depending on how far you’re willing to travel. Here are several museums and collections that are open to the public.

The Twining Teapot Gallery
The Twining Teapot Gallery is part of the Norwich Castle Museum and Art Gallery, in Norfolk, England. The collection numbers more than 3,000 teapots in all manner of shapes and sizes, with items that date from the 1730s to the present.

Flagstaff House Museum of Tea Ware
The Flagstaff House Museum of Tea Ware is a branch museum of the Hong Kong Museum of Art. It’s located in the former office and residence of the Commander of the British Forces in Hong Kong, in a building converted for museum use in 1984.

Trenton Teapot Collection
Located in that other Trenton (Tennessee), this collection of teapots modestly claims to be The World’s Largest Teapot Collection and includes pieces that date from 1750 to 1860. Teapots have become so important in this region that Trenton has hosted the annual Trenton Teapot Festival since 1981.

Time for Tea! Selections of Teaware from the Winterthur Collection
Located at the Winterthur Museum & Country Estate, in Winterthur, Delaware, this collection features “nearly 200 ceramic, metalwork, and glass teawares from America, Europe, China, and even Turkey that range in date from the 1600s through the 1860s.”

Sparta Teapot Museum of Craft & Design
The Sparta Teapot Museum is located in Sparta, North Carolina and is open every weekend from Thursday to Saturday.

Check out William’s blog, Tea Guy Speaks, for more great info!

2 thoughts on “Teapot Museums

  1. Pingback: What Is a Veilleuse Teapot? « Tea Blog

  2. Unfortunately, the museum in Sparta, NC, became a real political hot potato since it was built using “pork” money that our former Senator Elizabeth Dole tried to stop. The owners of the teapot collection were wealthy and could have afforded to build a museum themselves. Sad that such a wonderful thing as a teapot museum should have such a contentious beginning.

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