You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Chamomile’ tag.

There is a lot of concern these days over caffeine and about drinking something that will help this ailment or that ailment or make your hair shinier, your skin glow, and other such beneficial effects. Several herbals have come to the forefront, mainly through the constant marketing of them as miracle cures. But some of these also taste good. Imagine that! I selected five that seem to be the most common.

Top to bottom: Rooibos, Honeybush, Chamomile, Yerba Mate, Peppermint (ETS images)

Top to bottom: Rooibos, Honeybush, Chamomile, Yerba Mate, Peppermint (ETS images)

1 Rooibos

Rooibos (Dutch for “Redbush”) is from the plant Aspalathus linearis. The leaves turn red after being processed and infuse a red liquid containing some beneficial ingredients including calcium, potassium, and iron, but caffeine-free. This herbal became popular as a substitute for true tea during World War II due to difficulty shipping tea from Asia to Europe, just as chicory became a substitute for coffee when bean prices spiked. When this infusion started getting introduced to the U.S. market, a vendor decided it would sell better if called “red tea.” They ended up adding to the already sizable name confusion out there. Plus, there was already a red tea (it’s what Asians call a fully oxidized tea – we call that a “black tea”).

2 Honeybush

Honeybush is not a “tea” but rather one of those herbals made from an entirely different plant than the tea bush (Camellia Sinensis). The plant is from the cyclopia species and grows in South Africa in the rugged, inaccessible areas of the mountains near the Cape. The flowers and leaves, which are high in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, have been used to make infusions for centuries by natives of the area as a relief for various ailments. The infusion is caffeine-free, a great attraction for people who want to avoid anything stimulating and another great reason not to call it “tea.” The flavor is usually sweet and smooth, but it also lends itself to added flavorings.

3 Chamomile

Chamomile (aka “camomile”) is one of the most popular and well-known floral herbals. It is a flower similar in appearance to the daisy and in the same botanical family. Snow white wide, flat petals encircle a sunny yellow somewhat spherical center that is much larger than a daisy’s. This flower has been part of the herbalist’s “toolkit” since ancient Egyptian times, where it was used as a cure for malaria and was dedicated to the sun god, Ra. There is Roman chamomile and German chamomile (don’t let the names fool you, since they are grown elsewhere). However, Egyptian chamomile is widely noted as far more fragrant and flavorful than those. When buying chamomile, be sure to deal with a reputable vendor to assure you get true chamomile, not pineapple weed, which is sometimes substituted and can cause strong allergic reactions in hayfever sufferers (more so than from true chamomile).

4 Yerba Mate

Yerba mate is an herbal beverage that’s wildly popular in many countries in South America. It is traditionally drunk as a hot beverage that is served in a gourd called a “mate.” You sip it through a metal straw (a bombilla) that filters out the leaves and gritty bits. The flavor in its pure form can be a bit tough for the uninitiated to take but is still becoming increasingly popular in North America and elsewhere around the world. Added flavorings help many folks adjust to it. Plus, you can find it in a convenient bagged form.

5 Mint

Peppermint is a North American grown herb that contains no caffeine. Since it has a number of digestive aid properties, peppermint is often consumed after meals, including in a tisane or infusion. The oils in peppermint are said to stimulate the flow of secretions in the stomach and help relieve gas pains and calm your stomach. It’s use as a breath fresher is well-known. There are several brands, including Taylors of Harrogate, Twinings, and Harrison & Crosfield, plus blends like Moroccan Mint, or China White with Mint.

Choice galore for those of you ultra sensitive to caffeine or who just want something different. Enjoy!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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Nile Delta Chamomile

Nile Delta Chamomile

“Chamomile tea is something I have great use for as a dancer.”

If that sentence describing chamomile as a “tea” raised a red flag for you, then you can count yourself as a well-versed tea drinker. There has been much discussion on this blog about the distinction between a tea and an herbal infusion, or tisane, and what is often marketed as chamomile “tea” is actually not a tea at all since it does not contain the tea leaf, Camellia Sinensis. So before I go any further, let me clarify. When I say chamomile tea, I am not talking about the pure chamomile infusion. Instead, I am talking about teas that contain some chamomile. Some examples might be a white tea with chamomile and peach, or a green tea with chamomile, lemongrass, and ginger. The reason for this is simple and purely a matter of personal preference: despite the fact that it is a favourite tisane for many, I do not love the taste of chamomile.

So then, why drink it at all? Well, while pure chamomile is a little overwhelming, I do enjoy the taste when paired with other flavours. But, more importantly, I am after some of the benefits that it can provide, namely its anti-inflammatory and anti-spasmodic properties. Translated into everyday language, this means that chamomile can help relieve muscle soreness and relax the body—something I definitely need after a particularly challenging day of rehearsing or performing. While it is not a magical cure-all, I find that a cup or two of tea containing chamomile is a helpful complement to the stretching I might do and the hot baths I might take to help relieve muscle soreness. And this is not just for dancers—anyone whose work involves physical exertion, or who has been lugging a heavy laptop around all day, or who put themselves through a particularly strenuous work out at the gym might find they can benefit from chamomile.

But where do I acquire all these delicious sounding teas with chamomile? I create them! I always keep a tin of pure chamomile flowers at home, to blend with other teas as I see fit. That way, I can cater to my tastes in the moment (white or oolong? Ginger or mint?), and adjust how much chamomile I am using depending on how sore I am. A white tea with chamomile is especially good at night because of the exceptionally low caffeine content, and so I will often opt for this at end of a physically demanding day. Rooibos, although also not technically a tea, also makes a nice base for chamomile infusions at night for the same reason. Of course, if you are looking for the most beneficial chamomile infusion, your best bet is to go with pure chamomile. But if, like me, you can never quite manage to enjoy that cup of pure chamomile, blending your own chamomile tea might be the solution to enjoying both the benefits and the taste of your chamomile tea.

Disclaimer: This is not intended as medical advice. Please consult your physician for your particular needs.

[Editor’s note: Stash, Davidson’s, and others carry flavored chamomiles, plus chamomile-tea blends.]

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Stash Cinnamon Apple Chamomile

Stash Cinnamon Apple Chamomile

Name: Cinnamon Apple Chamomile Herbal

Brand: Stash

Type: Herbal tisane, flavored

Form: Paper tea bag

Review: One of the nifty things about drinking tisanes and flavored teas is finding one that is so well-blended that it satisfies your cravings for high-calorie treats. Stash’s Cinnamon Apple Chamomile Herbal is one of those tisanes.

Chamomile is a naturally buttery herb that, when used correctly, can give a tisane a remarkably unctuous quality. In the case of Cinnamon Apple Chamomile, Stash blends chamomile with a small amount of hibiscus, cinnamon, and apple flavoring to create a tisane that reminds me of apple cinnamon muffins (or apple pie, take your pick).

The chamomile provides a hot, buttery base for the fruit and cinnamon flavors. The flavor isn’t overpowering, mind you, but the components are well-chosen. As I have observed about other Stash products, their tea-blenders make good use of hibiscus, a rarity in the tea world. They don’t overpower their teas with the stuff, but do use it to add sweetness and depth to their fruit blends. The result is an apple-y, buttery, spicy delight that will undoubtedly be a fixture in my home this winter.

Food Pairings: This is a lovely evening sipper that does a great job of curbing sweet cravings on its own. But if you really need to nibble on something, try something very plain like shortbread or pound cake. You could also try sweets made with complimentary spices, such as carrot cake, spice cake or gingerbread.

Preparation Tips: Use boiling water to prepare this tisane, as the hibiscus, cinnamon and chamomile need the high temperature to give up a lot of their flavor. I wouldn’t bother putting this on ice: I don’t think it would be bad, but the pleasure of drinking this tisane is in how it reminds you of things that are always better hot (like pie and muffins).

Caution: Chamomile is related to the ragweed family: If you suffer from hay fever, pay attention to how this, and other chamomile blends affect you.

[Editor’s note: Our blog is chock full of great articles on this topic. Use our search feature to find them!]

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The Subject: Nile Delta Chamomile from The English Tea Store.

Rating:

Water temperature: 212° F
Steeping time: 5 minutes

Tea type: herbal (not a tea)
Scents, flavorings, etc.: N/A
Aroma, dry: Fresh, bright, lively, sweet, rich
Aroma in the cup, plain: Fresh, bright, lively, sweet, rich
Taste, plain: Rich yet mild, not bitter, relaxing
Aroma in the cup, enhanced: Fresh, bright, lively, sweet, rich
Taste, enhanced: N/A

2nd Infusion: Didn’t do

Chilled: Didn’t try

Comments:
There is one thing for sure: this is not dust in a bag. You can see that when first opening the pouch. And smell it, too! This herbal consists of actual chamomile (also “chamomile”) flower heads, so fresh in appearance, aroma, and flavor that hubby and I were ready for a trip down the Nile.

For those of you used to those dust-in-bag brands (we’ve been drinking Twinings, but there are lots of others out there) and have decided that chamomile is not for you, try this one. The steeped liquid is a beautiful yellow and has a rich flavor without any bitterness but is still definitely chamomile. A few sips and you’ll be feeling relaxed. I certainly was, enough so that I had to have a cuppa a rich Assam tea loaded with caffeine to spark me back up.

Disclaimer: This tea was provided by the company named. However, the rating of the tea and any opinions concerning it are always strictly objective.

You can find more great reviews at Little Yellow Teapot Tea Reviews!

Tea and herbal infusions can be a major part of your arsenal when the “achoo!” season reigns across the land. We’re talking hay fever, complete with itchy, watery eyes, headaches, and lots of boxes of tissues for all the stuff your body produces while overreacting to the allergen.

Hay fever (technically called “rhinitis”) simply put is your immune system working overtime. It encounters something it thinks is dangerous to you and goes into total “Rambo” mode trying to fight it off, sort of like using a fire hose to put out a birthday candle flame. There are dozens and dozens of products in the pharmaceutical aisles that you can swallow or inhale to help relieve symptoms. But if you’re a tea and/or herbal infusion drinker, you have a bunch of options that might already be in your tea pantry.

When researching this, I found absolutely tons of herbals to take for hay fever. Only a few teas (made from the tea plant, Camellia Sinensis) came up.

Egyptian Chamomile

The first herbal that comes to mind is chamomile. It’s good against hay fever but ironically has been painted as a cause of that allergy. There has been, according to Richard Romando, a tendency by some rather unethical merchants to pass off pineapple weed as chamomile. The pineapple weed causes the allergy, not the chamomile. People drinking the pineapple weed think they’re drinking chamomile and so think that is what is causing the allergic reaction. Just be sure to buy true chamomile, especially the Egyptian kind. [Note: You could still have an allergic reaction to chamomile, just not a hay fever reaction.]

Peppermint

Peppermint infusion can provide some hay fever relief along with several other benefits: alleviating stress and anxiety, soothing your digestion, and easing asthma. It’s also a breath freshener, has antioxidant properties, and is used in candies. An infusion made from 2 parts each of dried nettle and peppermint and 1 part each of red clover and Echinacea is another popular option. Throw in some honey and dried berries or other fruits to sweeten the taste as you prefer.

Vanilla Rooibos

Rooibos is another good herbal to drink on a regular basis if you are prone to the sneezing, itchy eyes and other effects of hay fever. This infusion has flavonoids that are known to be anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic. Sort of like a psychiatrist for “Rambo.” (“There, there, it’s just a little histamine and mucus. No need to use the flame thrower or  bazooka gun.”)

As for teas, green tea is a wunderkind (wonder child) in the world of tea. The catechins and caffeine in green tea keep your body from producing histamine, which causes all that mucus that ends up in your tissue or hanky. Unlike the antihistamines you buy at the store, green tea is stimulating and keeps you going during your busy day. Some people recommend drinking green tea about once every three hours, up to about two liters a day. You’ll have better results if you start drinking green tea about two weeks before hay fever season starts. Find a relaxing spot for your green tea moment to reduce stress, which makes you more susceptible to allergies.

Sencha Green Tea

A quick tip for those allergy-laden eyes: take two black teabags (any brand will do, in fact, the cheaper, the better) and steep in a little hot water briefly, then squeeze out excess water and place them over your closed eyes (you may want to let them cool for a few seconds first. This is a short but instant solution, especially if you have a meeting coming up. It’s also a great way to use those “office tea” teabags.

One thing that keeps popping up, for both teas and herbals, is freshness. The fresher, the better, especially with green teas. Again, a reputable vendor is your key. They will not only have untainted products, but also fresher products. Their reputation is on the line.

Hope this helps all you fellow hay fever sufferers. My teacup needs a refill and I feel another sneeze coming on!

Note: Please consult a physician before starting a tea/herbal regimen for your hay fever.

When you’ve finished sneezing, take a moment to check out A.C.’s fantastic blog, Tea Time with A.C. Cargill. It’s a great place to learn about tea!

It’s a hectic world out there — small wonder that chamomile is so popular. After fighting traffic to and from your job, meeting deadlines at work, chasing a child around the house who doesn’t want to take a bath or even wear clothing, or whatever your day is full of, a cup of chamomile is the perfect pre-beddybye-time beverage.

One of the most popular and well-known floral herbals is chamomile (also sometimes spelled “camomile”). Chamomile is a flower that is similar in appearance to the daisy and is in the same botanical family. Snow white wide, flat petals encircle a sunny yellow somewhat spherical center that is much larger than a daisy’s.

This flower has been part of the herbalist’s “toolkit” since ancient Egyptian times, where it was used as a cure for malaria and was dedicated to the sun god, Ra. I’m sure that writer Ellis Peters had crime-solving-soldier-turned-herbalist-monk Cadfael using it to treat the various ills around the monastery in Britain during the 12th century. These days, the two main species of chamomile noted for their medicinal uses are Roman chamomile and German chamomile (don’t let the names fool you, since they are grown elsewhere). However, Egyptian chamomile is widely noted as far more fragrant and flavorful than others.

Eygptian Chamomile

Chamomile when paired with peppermint has a reputation for aiding digestion and when paired with lemon grass for relaxing nerves. (Caution: Lots of health claims for herbals, including chamomile, are mostly anecdotal and not supported by clinical trials.) One thing I can say from personal experience is that it is relaxing and makes me sleepy. I can’t drink chamomile more than a half hour before bedtime, or I’ll conk out wherever I am sitting, standing, driving, etc. If you have hayfever, be careful about herbals like chamomile, which is part of the ragweed family (a known allergen). They can aggravate your symptoms.

Some health effects chamomile is purported to have:

  • Digestive aid (relieves acid indigestion, abdominal pain, and intestinal gas, and helps in cases of diarrhea, constipation, and peptic ulcers).
  • Anti-allergenic (unless you are prone to hayfever).
  • Relaxing and sedative-like, including calming restless children and hectic-lifestyle-frazzled adults.
  • Anti-inflammatory and antibacterial.
  • Easing colic and teething pain in babies.
  • Relieving headache and reducing fever in colds and flu.

External uses include an eye wash that is reported by some to soothe conjunctivitis, a hot compress to soothe burns and scalds, and a hair rinse to brighten hair. Wow! Quite a reputation to live up to.

Nile Delta Chamomile

Chamomile is a tasty addition to many recipes, from creamy risotto and fried chicken to sweet treats like cream puffs and pancakes. Recipes can call for both steeped chamomile and whole chamomile flowers (as decoration, usually). Try substituting a strongly steeped chamomile in a recipe that calls for tea or things like chicken broth. Here’s a chance to be adventurous in the kitchen, adding a healthy and exotic taste to one of your tried-and-true recipes.

When buying chamomile infusions (often misnamed “teas”), look for Egyptian chamomile. Also, be sure to deal with a reputable vendor to assure you get true chamomile, not pineapple weed, which is sometimes substituted and can cause strong allergic reactions in hayfever sufferers (more so than from true chamomile). Follow package directions to get the proper steep and, thus, the best benefits.

Time for beddy-bye and a cup of chamomile. Cheers!

Before hitting the sack this evening, fix yourself a nice cup of Chamomile and check out A.C.’s blog, Tea Time with A.C. Cargill!

Chamomile

Chamomile

The health benefits of tea (Camellia Sinensis) are touted everywhere you look. But what about those other brews made of various herbs and other plant parts that some people call “teas” (and that those of us who know better call “herbal infusions” or just “herbals”)?

These herbals through the centuries have been used to address a host of ills, in the absence of well-researched, man-made medicines. They are still very useful even with a drugstore full of products. Personally, I’d rather have a cup of chamomile to help me sleep instead of popping a pill. Chamomile also aids digestion and can be a soothing cupful if you are pregnant and avoiding caffeine.

Chamomile is just one of many herbals that are popular and healthful. Rooibos (red bush) has become increasingly well known among people who want a caffeine-free and beneficial beverage. The list doesn’t stop there, and as more research is done to confirm age-old folklore, more herbals get added every day.

Some of the more well-known herbals and health benefits they are supposed to have:

Chamomile

  • a natural sedative (if you have trouble sleeping)
  • anti-inflammatory and anti-spasmodic (to ease your cramps)
  • calming and often used to relieve anxiety
  • rich in essential oils and helps your digestive system function better

Jasmine

  • all the beneficial antioxidant properties of green tea
  • relaxing, warming, and soothing to your digestion
  • according to recent studies, may also help lower cholesterol and increase longevity

Ginger

  • powerful medicinal properties and a breath freshener
  • helps soothe stomach upset (neutralizes acids and aids digestion) and respiratory problems
  • relieves motion sickness, dizziness, flatulence, and muscle pain
Rooibos

Rooibos

Rooibos (redbush)

  • from the South African highlands
  • contains antioxidants, including some not found in any other plants
  • contains a host of minerals, including zinc, iron, magnesium, and potassium
  • relieves stomach cramps and colic in infants
  • eases headaches, irritability, insomnias and nervous tension
  • boosts the immune system
  • treats hay fever, asthma, and eczema
  • slows the aging process when applied directly on the skin

Honeybush

  • a sweet, smooth tisane grown in Africa
  • high in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants
  • aids in digestion
  • eases coughs
  • regulates blood sugar
  • reduces menopausal symptoms
  • prevents cancer and osteoporosis
  • stimulates milk production in lactating mothers

Some more exotic herbals:

Tulsi

Tulsi

Tulsi (also called “Holy Basil”)

  • from India
  • reduces stress and promotes mental clarity
  • lowers cholesterol and high blood pressure, promoting heart health
  • contains antioxidants that promote wellness and longevity by building the body’s immune system
  • improves strength, stamina, and endurance by promoting respiratory health
  • helps with digestion and gastrointestinal problems while facilitating healthy liver function, and more

Mugicha

  • from Japan
  • made from roasted barley
  • drunk cold in Summer

Additional plants used are chrysanthemum (popular in China), hibiscus (popular in the Middle East), ginseng, nettle, sage, thyme, strawberry leaf, lemon grass leaf, alfalfa, fennel seed, rosehips, and lemon verbena.

Last but not least is essiac “tea” made from a variety of plants and blended differently according to the effect desired. Several of the herbs used have cancer-fighting properties: blessed thistle, burdock root, kelp (also a great source of iron), red clover, wild sheep sorrel (stronger than the kind you put in salads), slippery elm bark, Turkish rhubarb root, and watercress (loaded with vitamin C and other goodies).

Note: Like the commercials for alcoholic beverages say, drink responsibly. With herbals, that means always checking with an herbalist and your physician before consuming them. Overindulging in some herbals can be dangerous, and allergic reactions could result, especially if you aren’t getting what you think you are (for example, pineapple weed is sometimes sold as chamomile and can cause a reaction in hay fever sufferers).

Feel a sniffle coming on? Choose an appropriate herbal infusion. To your health!

Disclaimer: This is not medical advice. Consult your physician before beginning an herbal regimen.

Learn more about the wide world of tea over on A.C.’s blog, Tea Time with A.C. Cargill!

Name: Herbal Chamomile

Brand: Harney & Sons

Type: Herbal tisane

Form: Silken pyramid tea bags

Review: There are times when even the most die-hard tea lover has to say “enough” to true tea and take the time to enjoy an herbal tisane. Sometimes the the caffeine gets to you, other times the tannic acid gets to your tummy. In either case, tea lovers know that they can get their hot (or cold) beverage fix from one of the many excellent tisanes on the market.

(Incidentally, “tisane” is tea-industry-speak for herbal infusions that don’t contain any true tea.)

Of course, it always helps when the tisane is produced by one of America’s premier tea-blenders. Harney & Sons produces some great teas, so I figured they would know what they were doing when it came to sourcing a good chamomile.

(I was right.)

Chamomile is a herb in the daisy family, long prized in many cultures for its various medicinal qualities as well as its rich flavor. Traditionally regarded as a relaxing tonic, many people drink a chamomile infusion in the evenings to help themselves wind down.

While some tea companies blend their chamomile with other flavors (citrus and mint are popular pairings), Harney & Sons wisely chose to keep their chamomile pure. The dried herb infuses to a rich yellow-gold with a buttery and slightly vegetal nose. The tisane itself is medium bodied, and is a bit more astringent than I expected it to be.  The tea’s flavor is also a bit spicy, with less of the buttery flavor than is suggested in the nose. If you are missing your true tea and looking for a more robust tisane, Harney & Son’s Herbal Chamomile may be just the ticket.

Incidentally, a bag of this tisane can be infused at least twice.  It is also quite tasty and refreshing on ice.

[Editor’s note: Our blog is chock full of great articles on this topic. Use our search feature to find them!]

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Disclaimer: This is not intended as medical advice. Please consult your physician for your particular needs.

You hear a lot about all of the health benefits of tea these days. Everyone is claiming that oolong can make you lose weight, green tea will prevent cancer, and black tea will save you from the perils of tooth decay.

The jury is still out on a lot of these claims, but it does seem pretty definite that tea makes a healthy addition to your life. But what about all those herbal infusions? Walking down the aisles of any grocery store, you see teas promoting serenity and different kinds of health. While I am no doctor, I wanted to share with you some of the traditional medicinal uses for herbs, especially those that you might be able to grow in your own garden.

For acne, Marie Nadine Antol, the author of Healing Teas, recommends, among others, the common weed dandelion. This humble yellow flower is also listed as a treatment for anemia, blood-pressure problems, cholesterol problems, digestion, and a slew of other ailments. Perhaps don’t be so quick with the round-up on your lawn this spring.

Possibly the most common ingredient in herbal infusions, chamomile likewise seems to be somewhat of a miracle herb. Antol suggests chamomile for the treatment of muscle cramps, arthritis, colds and flu, digestion, general pain, as well as a great many more. Mixed with peppermint, chamomile might make a good treatment for a headache.

I happen to be a big fan of peppermint, which always has a place in a pot in my garden (otherwise it becomes quite invasive). I’ve found that it helps any uncomfortable tummy feelings, but apparently it can also help with weight control, rheumatism, colic, and cold extremities. My husband might recommend I drink more to help with my Popsicle toes.

Remember that this humble author is no doctor and cannot make any medical recommendations. I am simply sharing with you suggestions from Antol’s book, Healing Teas.

Check Stephanie out at her Blog, The Tea Scoop!

[Editor’s note: Our blog is chock full of great articles on this topic. Use our search feature to find them!]

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

By Alexandra Hoover [reposted from our sister blog]

High on catnip?

High on catnip?

If you’ve ever wanted to experience firsthand what catnip is all about, you may want to make this catnip tea. It also includes chamomile, lemon balm, mint, and lemongrass. You need half a cup of catnip, a fourth of a cup of mint, a fourth of a cup of lemongrass, three-fourths of a cup of chamomile, and one cup of dried lemon balm.

This recipe is especially worthwhile if you have a garden. If you have been growing catnip, but don’t have a cat, here is your chance to try something new and appropriate. (Yes, catnip can be used by humans!)

To prepare it, mix all the ingredients together. Make sure you keep them in a sealed container until you want to make the tea. When you are ready for your catnip delight, put two teaspoons in a mug of boiling water for a maximum of five minutes. Take the herbs out, unless you prefer your tea to be strong. In that case, enjoy them in your cup for as long as you like.

Catnip tea does not produce the same affects on humans as it does cats. After drinking a sip, you won’t roll around on the floor, pouncing on imaginary objects. It is calming and welcome after a stressful day or taxing activity.

In addition to the tea’s sedative qualities, it provides numerous health benefits. For instance, catnip tea will relax your muscles and relieve nervousness. It also possesses anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties. It is beneficial for most people with one exception–avoid drinking this tea if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Whether your cat will drink this tea is another story altogether. Stick to the liquid variety and your cat will stick to the herb.

Fact: Did you know that catnip belongs to the mint family?

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© Online Stores, LLC, and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, LLC., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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