Chinese New Year, Chinese Herbal Infusions, and Marbled Tea Eggs

The Chinese New Year is a celebration of change which equates to the familiar saying, “out with the old and in with the new”.  I celebrated Chinese New Year for the first time in Brisbane, with these 10 points in mind.

  • Make Time for family – I ventured down to Chinatown with my husband to watch the festivities and shared a cup of a Chinese Herbal containing Chrysanthemum flowers, Goji berries and Red dates.   
Chrysanthemum flowers, Goji berries and Red dates herbal
Chrysanthemum flowers, Goji berries and Red dates herbal
  • Accepting Gifts Red envelopes (Lei See) are given as gifts where the red colour of the envelope and the money inside symbolizes good luck and is said to ward off evil spirits. 
  • Year of the Dragon / Dragon or Lion Dance – A dragon or lion dance is performed on New Year’s Day to bring luck and prosperity for the coming year.  People born in the year of the Dragon are said to be strong, self-assured and loyal. What Chinese zodiac animal are you?
Double Dragon, Double Luck
Double Dragon, Double Luck
  • Kumquats, Peanuts and candies Kumquats represent prosperity; peanuts, long life and eating fruits and candies are encouraged to symbolize having a sweet and abundant life.   
  • Imagery / symbolism – Chinese New Year is all about decorating the house with signs and posters on doors and windows with the word for luck (). 
  • Negative Chi –To ill fortune and negative chi, one must reconcile differences, forget any grudges and sincerely wish peace, love and happiness to all! 
  • Good Fortune – One must sweep away ill fortune on New Year’s to make way for incoming good luck for the coming year.
  • Traditional foods – Many traditional foods served throughout the festivities because the name or look of the food sounds/looks similar to a lucky word.  One of my favourites are tea eggs, symbolizing fertility.
  • Evil Spirits – As well as wearing red fire crackers are set off to ward off spirits and a way to send out the old year and welcome the New Year.             
  • Ancestors – Temples are visited to pay respect to ancestors, and food and incense is brought to please the spirits of the decreased.

See also:
Tea and the Chinese New Year

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2 thoughts on “Chinese New Year, Chinese Herbal Infusions, and Marbled Tea Eggs

  1. Pingback: A Year of Great Blog Articles « Tea Blog

  2. Pingback: Chinese New Year, Chinese Herbal Infusions and Marbled Tea Eggs « MayKingTea's Blog

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