Tea Kettle Philosophy — Thought Chain Reaction

Tea Kettle Philosophy involves a lot of thinking. Thinking of one thing leads to another. Filling a tea kettle with water leads to the thought of that tasty tea and its long history. The tea can lead to thoughts of chocolate cake and sitting with friends sipping and talking of such matters of high import as what the new trends in nail polish color will be. And that could lead to thoughts of very bad first dates and that very good one. It’s a thought chain reaction!

Whose mind wouldn’t wander with a tea like this? Borengajuli Estate – heaven in a teacup. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)
Whose mind wouldn’t wander with a tea like this? Borengajuli Estate – heaven in a teacup. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

What brought this to mind was a day like many others. Hubby had gone to the Post Office to check our box there for any mail coming in. I was home doing my regular tea-related activities and hoping that some promised tea samples had arrived in that post box. This led to thinking about trying out those samples and writing up reviews, which led to thinking about the vendor, and then to thinking about needing to go shopping for groceries since we were low on milk which I like to have in my stronger black teas, and then on to thinking about… BEEP! BEEP! BEEP! BEEP! BEEP! BEEP! BEEP! BEEP! BEEP! BEEP! BEEP! BEEP! BEEP!

Uh oh! All this thinking led where most chain reactions lead: to a mishap! In this case it was the bacon burning in the frying pan. Yes, I was frying bacon and had some scones in the oven while tweeting on Twitter and posting on Facebook. Multi-tasking at its finest! Well, sort of…

Those smoke alarms are REALLY LOUD, so I took the frying pan out onto the deck and turned on fans to dissipate the smoke. The beeping stopped. Sadly, the bacon was a bit…uh, well… cindery. Sigh! Now you know why my blog isn’t about cooking!

The worst part about all this was hubby walking through the door as I was coming back into the house with a frying pan of cinder-bacon. And he had no tea samples. Which is what started this thought chain reaction in the first place.

The big point here is how we can go from thought to thought to thought and find ourselves deep in the woods of memories and ideas with no notion of how we got there. That’s fine if we can find our way back or be able to forge ahead and don’t lose track of what we’re doing, such as frying bacon or steeping tea.

I also should probably not try to do so many things at once. Or let that thought chain reaction go on so long. Sigh!

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2 thoughts on “Tea Kettle Philosophy — Thought Chain Reaction

  1. Victoria

    I, too, experience several thought chain reactions. I have had to explain how I arrived at a point, listing each thought as you’ve done here. Thankfully, I’ve only had to explain those thoughts to family members, so it makes the snickers and teasing a little easier to manage, than say at a meeting!

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