Tea and Snow

Tea and snow are natural go-togethers. But there’s snow and then there’s snow. Time to steep up a steaming pot of tea and contemplate just what the heck that means.

Social media is such fun and reveals a bit about life in other locations. For example, an area gets a half inch snowfall and is all aghast while another gets two feet of snow and reports that the roads are clear and everything is functioning normally. A tea buddy on Facebook was quite displeased at seeing that small bit of snow outside, while Janis (another writer on this blog) and I held the opposite view — that the snow there was merely lending a wintry atmosphere for teatime.

I grew up where, as soon as the weather man forecast snow, the local officials had the plows up and running. A two-foot snowfall never caused schools to close, openings to be delayed, busses not to run, etc. Ice storms were another matter, and understandably so. (I even had to walk home from school one time over sheets of ice that had formed during the day because the busses couldn’t drive on the streets. I was as frozen as those streets by the time I reached home.) So, it gave us quite a chuckle when a friend moved (during our senior year of high school) to the Southeast U.S. and called to say schools were closed.

An unusually heavy snowfall for this area of Southeast U.S. Considering the way folks drive around here with only a dusting of snow, I was glad to be a telecommuter. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)
An unusually heavy snowfall for this area of Southeast U.S. Considering the way folks drive around here with only a dusting of snow, I was glad to be a telecommuter. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

“Hey, how’s everything at the new school?”

“It’s closed today.”

“Really? Some kind of holiday or teachers conference?”

“Nope. Snow day.”

“Wow! I didn’t know the southeast got that much snow.”

“It doesn’t that often. Everything is closed and they’re in a total panic.”

“Gee, how much snow did you get? Three feet, maybe?”

“Are you sitting down?”

“Uh… yeah…”

“One inch!”

*copious laughter on both ends of the conversation*

Now, of course, I live in the Southeast U.S. for the moment and see what all the upset was about. First, snow is such a rare occurrence that snow plows have to be brought in from other, snowier areas whenever snowfall is forecast. That takes time to coordinate. Second, a lot of folks here are transplants from places like Florida, southern Texas, and coastal California, all of which rarely see snowfall. So, they have no idea how to drive when roads are anything but bone dry (rainfall also tends to cause them frustration and concern, and pileups routinely are reported on the news and radio traffic reports).

The good thing about everything shutting down is that all those folks can be home enjoying tea. Oh wait, around here they mostly only drink that iced, sweetened stuff. Not in this house, though. And we don’t need snowfall to get that kettle going. But that mere dusting (as we would call it back home) sure does lend a nice cozy atmosphere to teatime.

Wherever you are, take advantage of even the merest bit of snow to enjoy a great tea moment!

See also: Snow Day Tea Time

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