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Teacup and Books (stock image)

Teacup and Books (stock image)

Few things are as satisfying as sitting down with a good cup of tea and a good book. I sense many of you readers nodding along in agreement, but I wonder exactly why this is the case. Having recently (and unusually) had some time to get deeply stuck into a good book, I have been pondering this question. And, needless to say, if I am at home, I put the kettle on as I settle down to read. Here are a few musings on books and tea that have come out of this recent experience:

  1. For me, there is a sense of ritual in both tea drinking and book reading. I have my places that I like to sit and read and times of the day that I prefer to read at. Likewise, there are specific ways I like to make my tea, and the act of putting the kettle on, brewing the tea, and then settling down to sip it are all part of my daily routines. This sense of ritual I have for both reading and tea drinking complement and reinforce one another.
  2. Reading and drinking tea are both activities that are about having time to myself. Whilst it is true that I often drink tea in the company of others, and that sometimes tea is a rushed cuppa squeezed into my schedule, for the most part having a cup of tea means taking some time for myself. Likewise, serious reading only occurs when I have the time to really invest in it.
  3. Unless I am reading a fast paced page-turner, I like to take breaks during reading to contemplate and ponder the things I am reading about. What better moment to sip some tea? But more than that, I think that the act of sipping tea, or pouring another cup, means that I actually do contemplate things, rather than just staring off into space.
  4. My last thought (for now) on this subject is that drinking tea and reading are activities that complement each other year round. In the winter, there are few things more enjoyable than snuggling up with a book and a hot cup of tea on the couch. However, an equally appealing prospect is to stretch out in the summer sun with a good book and a glass of chilled iced tea within arm’s reach. In other words, they are something that can always go together.

I often drink tea without reading, and there are many occasions when I open my book for a bit without a cup of tea by my side. But when I am able to combine these two things, it seems to me that each complements the other and by doing so increases my enjoyment of both. So here’s to many more hours of reading whilst drinking tea!

See more of Elise Nuding’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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The phrase “tea party” has a number of meanings nowadays. It might refer to an actual tea party, complete with actual tea and those cute little crustless sandwiches. Or it might refer to a political movement of recent vintage. Or it could refer to a number of political uprisings that took place during our colonial days, as briefly touched upon in this article. Or it might refer to “the” tea party – the one that took place in Boston almost exactly (depending on what date this article is actually published) 239 years ago.

British Favorites for your own private tea party! Too good to toss overboard! (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

British Favorites for your own private tea party! Too good to toss overboard! (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

If you do even a cursory search for books on the topic of the Boston Tea Party you’ll find that there are about zillion (give or take a couple of million). Many of these have been written in relatively recent times, but for an interesting perspective on this or any other historical event you might try going back in time closer to the actual event. For starters, you might try a pair of curiously similar books I ran across recently that were published only about six decades after the fact.

The first of these is James Hawkes’ A Retrospect of the Boston Tea-party: With a Memoir of George R. T. Hewes, a Survivor of the Little Band of Patriots who Drowned the Tea in Boston Harbour in 1773, a book that first appeared in 1834.

In his preface Hawkes puts the numbers of this band of patriots at anywhere from sixty to as much as two hundred, depending on who was doing the counting. He also points out that, not surprisingly, these patriots weren’t keen to go around bragging about their involvement in this somewhat incendiary event. By the time of Hawkes’ book Hewes was said to be the last of the group still drawing breath. The two hundred-some pages of his reminiscences might include a little more than we need to know about his early life, but readers not needing or wanting to read any of this can skip past it to the more pertinent tea party stuff.

For another take on essentially the same source material, take a look at Traits of the Tea Party: Being a Memoir of George R.T. Hewes, One of the Last of Its Survivors : With a History of That Transaction, Reminiscences of the Massacre, and the Siege, and Other Stories of Old Times. It was written by Benjamin Bussey Thatcher and perhaps not coincidentally, was published just a year after the aforementioned volume.

It’s a different book, for the most part, though it proceeds in roughly the same fashion, and the author was kind enough to break things down into chapters, with a detailed listing of contents for each chapter. Which comes in handy, if, once again, the reader would like to skip straight to the tea party stuff.

In any event, whether you want to read these entire works or just browse selected passages, you can grab the free ebooks located here and here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Every now and then I get offered the opportunity to read a new book and write a review. Usually, like many of you, I consider reading time also to be tea time. Sadly, there are times when the tea is the only good thing about the experience. Thus was the case with the latest book I reviewed recently.

Golden Yunnan – not peppery enough to take away the bad taste of that badly written book!

Golden Yunnan – not peppery enough to take away the bad taste of that badly written book!

There is a term in the world of the arts: derivative. To many writers, painters, and composers, it is an anathema. It implies that their work has no spark of originality, that they are just copying the work of those that preceded them. In reality, art builds on itself, one artist’s vision inspiring other artists, resulting in whole art “movements” such as Impressionism and Rococo/Baroque.

In the case of the book I read, it was inspired by a hit series on one of the cable TV channels. No problem with that, as far as I’m concerned. The real issue is that the writer didn’t have a good grasp of how to write, and my guess is that the publisher also went cheap and didn’t have the author working with a good editor. At least, that’s sure how it seemed to me. A well-written book grabs the reader at the start and doesn’t present a garbled mess that leaves the reader scratching her head in utter perplexity.

Sigh, this book was definitely going to need a strong potful of tea, maybe even two potfuls.

Time to set the kettle on and prep the teapot with some Golden Yunnan tea leaves. (Bet you thought I was going to say Assam, didn’t you!) The flavor tends to have a faint peppery quality, but the tea liquid is rich enough to stand up to some milk and sweetener. After reading the first short chapter of this book, I definitely needed a tea that would keep me awake and sane!

Sorry to say that even after two potfuls of that superb Golden Yunnan tea and some chocolate chip cookies baked up fresh (I needed extra fortifying to slog through the convoluted writing full of “space filler” details that seemed to have nothing to do with the story), the novel didn’t get any better. By the end, I would have gladly turned myself in at a sanatorium for a rest cure!

In case you’re wondering what the book is, I am choosing to withhold the title to spare you the horror. Here’s hoping that the next book you read is a good one!

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Longing Heart Flowering Tea

Longing Heart Flowering Tea

If you’ve ever tried a flowering tea, you know there’s more to the experience than just the end result. A flowering tea is crafted as a beginning-to-finale art form. A tight little ball of mystery is dropped into a warm bath, and a breath of anticipation is held. Then, slowly and deliberately, petals of green tea unfurl, revealing carefully chosen blooms and herbals for more color and taste than first hinted at.

English Tea Store’s Longing Heart Flowering Tea comes from the Anhui Province of China, created by a tea master to ease his longing heart on difficult journeys to Beijing. And it is a perfect example of art-meets-flavor. Gentle green tea effortlessly mingles with jasmine and a plume of amaranth (another name for the plant called Love Lies Bleeding), producing a mild but satisfying botanical finish.

Love Lies Bleeding

Love Lies Bleeding

It’s the ideal sipping companion to Jess McConkey’s paranormal mystery Love Lies Bleeding. In McConkey’s novel, Samantha Moore awakens from a coma to find herself enwrapped in a life of pain and dependency. She is at the beginning of her difficult journey to recovery; not only from the injuries she sustained in a brutal attack, but from the emotional aftermath. Her father and her fiancé agree to send her to recuperate in a remote cabin in an isolated town in Minnesota. A town that is a tight little ball of mystery, much like Sam herself. She resents her loss of freedom, both because of the way her family controls her decisions, and the way her fear controls her mind.

But as the novel unfolds, Samantha grows and unfurls, slowly and deliberately, to reveal more strength than first hinted at. At Elk Horn Lake, hidden secrets effortlessly mingle with danger, haunting, and romance, and author McConkey navigates these treacherous waters to produce a mild but satisfying literary finish.

If you choose to sweeten the tea, don’t add much! This tea, and this story, are artfully understated. But one thing is strongly clear: sipping English Tea Store’s Longing Heart Flowering Tea while reading McConkey’s “Love Lies Bleeding” (with a bloom of the title-worthy plant) is a literal taste of real mystery.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Jasmine Dragon Tears green tea

Jasmine Dragon Tears green tea

The English Tea Store’s Jasmine Dragon Tears tea is a steamed, hand-rolled, jasmine-infused experience that is not to be rushed. Heated in water just shy of boiling, the pearls unfurl to reveal themselves and the top bud of the plant, still bearing soft hairs, so indicative of a gentle handling and masterful touch. The tea is designed to be sipped, savored, and enjoyed with a deep appreciation for its artful result.

Which is exactly my experience in reading Michael Williams’ magical realism novel, Trajan’s Arch. The reading of the book is not to be rushed. Just shy of literary, the language unfurls to reveal the memories of the main character, Gabriel, and the strange and magical influence throughout his lifetime of his mysterious neighbor, Trajan. Through Williams’ imagery, so indicative of gentle handling and a masterful touch, the novel is designed to be sipped, savored, and enjoyed with a deep appreciation for its artful result.

Trajan's Arch

Trajan's Arch

But the unique quality of Jasmine Dragon Tears tea really comes through with its flavor. The highest quality jasmine blooms are picked alongside the tea plants, in the Wuyi District of Fujian Province, China. The harvest is then layered—jasmine blooms, then tea leaves, jasmine blooms, then tea leaves—until jasmine essence infuses the overall character and outcome. The intensity of the high floral notes make this truly the best of what high quality jasmine tea can be.

As well, in Williams’ Trajan’s Arch, the novel is literally layered with stories, written by Trajan, to reveal how the character infuses Gabriel’s life and love (Gabriel’s estranged wife happens to be named Jasmine). Trajan affects those who know him with an intensity that lingers for generations.

With English Tea Store’s Jasmine Dragon Tears tea, you won’t be disappointed. There’s no need for sweetener, the rich blend of green tea and floral makes for a satisfying sip. And pairing it with Trajan’s Arch is a novel and tea companion that brings to the senses an experience of magic-come-true.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

A nice cuppa Tie Kuan Yin Iron Goddess Oolong goes perfect with this novel of mystery and personal discovery

A nice cuppa Tie Kuan Yin Iron Goddess Oolong goes perfect with this novel of mystery and personal discovery

China is known by some as the land of tea, that is, the place where tea drinking began. For thousands of years, China had a stranglehold on the tea market that was finally broken by a tricky Scotsman. It is a land with a long history, lots of traditions, and relatively recently an upheaval and establishment of a new government. Lots there to inspire authors.

Donna Carrick, a talented author living in Canada, certainly soaked in a lot of atmosphere from the time she spent in China going through the strenuous adoption process. This came to good use when writing The First Excellence, a story of adventure, mystery, danger, and a close-up look at what life is like in the land of tea. That makes this book an example of what a lot of good authors do: they take a personal experience and use it to spin a tale that becomes a novel that’s hard to put down and, when you have to put it down because you can’t keep your eyes open, you keep thinking about it and wondering what is going to happen next. The voice of having “been there” comes through loud and clear and cannot be faked.

One of the best parts of reading this book was that I hadn’t guessed the ending after reading the first few chapters. (Considering a book I had read not too long ago where I had guessed the ending, this is important.) In fact, there are parts of this novel that read like a chess game, with a trap being set or an opponent being led down a fake path.

The basic plot involves a young woman named Fa-ling, born in China and eventually adopted by a Canadian couple. She travels from Canada back to China with a group of excited parents-to-be as they go to the city of Nanning to finally hold in their arms the babies they have been trying to adopt for quite some time. Interwoven is Fa-ling’s journey into her past, a murder or two, some local police detectives and sinister government officials, and a plot hatched by a woman as the supposed solution to her problem that ends up putting her and others in danger instead.

One of those local detectives is less than hygienic, leading to a comment or two about strong unpleasant odor. Some people think that having a rather malodorous detective as part of the cast of characters is a bit gimmicky. Maybe, but I look at the full context. This is not some divorced, drunken, slovenly Swede as in the Henning Mankell novels. Nor is it a quirky Belgian Detective living in the U.K. Here, Carrick simply uses this aspect of the character to “flesh him out” for us, making him more of a real person while showing us a bit more about the culture in this country so little known in the West even today. “Made in China” is more than just words on the bottom of a teacup or on that bag of tea we just purchased.

Carrick similarly “fleshes out” other characters with little glimpses into their psyches and details sprinkled here and there of their physical and mental make-up. Of course, this includes their hopes, fears, and natural urges, all handled deftly by Carrick. You also get quite a peek at a land that has prized its privacy and security since the days the Great Wall was built to hold back the Monguls.

Don’t miss the quotable gems, like this one:

“There is nothing like the company of youth and the satisfaction of a decision reached to restore one’s natural energy and vigour.”

Chinese symbol for good luck

Chinese symbol for good luck

Steep a pot of tea, sip it softly, and dive into this excellent novel by an accomplished author who, together with her husband Alex, also has time to take care of their children, including her adopted treasure from China.

And may your first excellence be tea, everyone!

Note: The First Excellence recently won the first Indie Book Event Award for Excellence in Fiction ever given out. 

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Time for you and time for me,

And time yet for a hundred indecisions,

And for a hundred visions and revisions,

Before the taking of a toast and tea.

– T.S. Eliot –

 

Where’s the link between tea and great literature? Glad you asked. A little while back the New Yorker examined those links in a piece called Tea: A Literary Tour. Author Eileen Reynolds takes a look at tea and Jane Austen, which was the subject of an appropriately titled book not so long ago – Tea With Jane Austen. Also touched upon, among others, Dickens and the most famous tea party of them all, the one that takes place in Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2010/11/tea-a-literary-tour.html

 

If that’s not enough tea and literature for you, you can turn your attention to something of a more recent vintage, though its setting is a historic one. The Tea Rose, by Jennifer Donnelly, is a historical romance with its roots firmly planted in the tea industry. For more about it, be sure to check out this review, here at the English Tea Blog.

http://englishtea.us/2010/02/24/the-tea-rose-review-an-analysis/

 

For another work of fiction along similar lines, be sure to check out The Tea Lords, by the Dutch writer Hella Haasse. It was first published in the Netherlands in 1992 but was recently translated into English. It’s an interesting look at the colonialism and the tea industry in the East Indies in the late nineteenth century. For more about this one check out this pair of recent articles in the British press, here and here.

http://www.metro.co.uk/lifestyle/books/848278-the-tea-lords-an-interesting-dispatch-from-an-alien-culture

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010/dec/04/tea-lords-hella-haasse-review

 

For something a little less literary but a little more tea-oriented take a look at The World in Your Teacup: Celebrating Tea Traditions, Near and Far, by Lisa Boalt Richardson. As the author puts it, “The World in

Your Teacup takes you on the journey of tea to discover how and why it is celebrated all around the globe.”

http://www.amazon.com/World-Your-Teacup-Celebrating-traditions/dp/0736925805

 

If you’d like to make “an inner journey of self-discovery through the simple practice of sipping tea” then gets your hands on a copy of Sereni-Tea: Sipping Self Success, by Dharlene Marie Fahl. If you never thought that tea could help you “quiet your mind, open your heart and nurture your being as you drink in the peace of self success,” it might be time to rethink your position on this issue.

http://www.amazon.com/Sereni-Tea-Sipping-Dharlene-Marie-Fahl/dp/0984460039

Oolong is a traditional Chinese tea that is only partly fermented, giving it an in-between character that lacks the bitterness and body of black tea, yet is richer and rounder than a conventional green. English Tea Store’s Oolong Orange Blossom Estate Tea is a particularly satisfying rendition of this Far East treat, with the gentle addition of the essence of orange blossoms.

Orange blossoms are the jasmine-looking blooms of a springtime orange tree. Their elegant petals cup to form the place where an orange will eventually grow; but first, they flourish on the limb as their own kind of gift. Orange blossoms fan the air with an amazingly heady perfume of honey, turning orchards into magic gardens, and beckoning passers-by to pause, and to breathe in deeply. They are the reminder that soon, more gifts will follow. In that way, orange blossoms are a promise.

In The Secrets of Jin-Shei, a novel by Alma Alexander, we are swept into the mythical Chinese kingdom of Linh-an, steeped in tradition and culture, that beckons us to pause, and to breathe in deeply. In the novel, we learn of the covert written language jin-ashu, the woman’s tongue, taught for generations from mother to daughter to allow a woman to reveal the dreams and desires deeply held in her heart. It is through these words that sister-bonds are formed. And it is through this language, as the heady perfume of sweet tomorrows, that vows are made. In that way, the jin-shei is a promise.

Be patient in brewing Oolong Orange Blossom Tea, to give it the time it needs to unfurl into the richness of its character. And there’s no need to sweeten; it brings its own honeyed aftertaste. As well, give The Secrets of Jin-Shei time to reveal the depths of its characters and the fulfillment of its own sweet promise.

As tea-and-novel companions, Oolong Orange Blossom Tea and The Secrets of Jin-Shei are a most honorable match.

Learn more about Jackie and her work at JackieGamber.com!

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

English Tea Store brand Ginger Tea is a classic tea with a twist. The high-quality black tea leaves brew into a rich, golden liquid just right for polite tea society, yet the mild ginger brings a hint of glamor and heat to the overall sipping experience.

It’s similar to what you’ll find in reading Mary Robinette Kowal’s Shades of Milk and Honey, a novel Jane Austen might have written, if she lived in a world of magic. Kowal captures the rich tones of England’s nineteenth-century polite society—the gentry folk who revere an afternoon tea—but mixes in a new, gentle art skill: magic, or in Kowal’s writing, glamor.

Her main character, Jane, must navigate the complicated rules of her culture, keep to her high-quality standards, and yet discover her vein of passion that brings her strongest glamor to fruition.

In brewing English Tea Store’s Ginger Tea, you’ll taste a cup of classic flavor enhanced with the delicate warmth of ginger essence. In reading Shades of Milk and Honey, you’ll touch a world of classic characters flavored with the gentle heat of their glamor.

And to match the novel with its tea companion even more closely, add a shade of milk and honey! Milk, not cream—this tea curdles cream—and just a dollop of honey. Does it get any more perfect?

English Tea Store’s Ginger Tea and Kowal’s Shades of Milk and Honey. The combination is pure magic.

Visit Jackie’s Web site, JackieGamber.com, to learn more about her work!

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Tea lovers, take heart at a new mystery novel that will transport you to a tea garden in a Himalayan valley near Darjeeling, India. It is Dark Road to Darjeeling by American author Deanna Raybourn. Grab yourself a tasty cup of freshly steeped Darjeeling tea first, though! This novel will whet your tea tastebuds (and your mystery appetite).

Unfortunately for me, this novel is the fourth in a series by Raybourn that features the impetuous and aristocratic Lady Julia Grey. If you haven’t read the first three novels yet, read them before diving into this one so that events in this book won’t spoil things for you. (It was a bit impractical for me to buy the first three books, read them, and then read this one. Oh, well.)

For me, the book started a bit contrived and slow. Some of this was necessary to get readers up to speed on things. Further on, the pace quickens as Raybourn leads you (as any good mystery author does) down a few false paths, only to show you a chapter later that the truth lies in another direction or to open another possibility to you. This is a writer’s device that holds your interest and keeps you from guessing too quickly what is really going on. Just when I thought I had it figured out…

By the time the solution to the main mystery is revealed a few others have popped up, another interest-holding device. There is also a sprinkling of the author’s view of things like the importance of having some feeling of purpose in one’s life. Another is the frustration experienced by younger offspring of an aristocrat when the eldest is the one who will inherit yet they, due to their lineage, are not encouraged to seek some useful pursuits (what we these days call a career).

The author shows some knowledge of tea and has clearly done her research, mentioning “flowering” teas in one scene and oolongs in another. She also uses such terms as “flush” (fresh growth on the tea bushes that is harvested and processed for sale). Her descriptions of the valley and the main mountain of the Himalayas that watches over it is vivid enough to transport you from your comfy chair to that land. She describes the deft actions of the tea pickers in an almost reverent way. The best feature is how the valley had been transformed by a man with guts and vision from one full of poisonous plants to a place where people thrived.

A down note is Lady Julia Grey (née “March”), who doesn’t seem mature and interesting enough for a single novel, let alone a series. Halfway through this book I got fatigued by her childish, overly headstrong manner. An aristocratic upbringing cannot be totally to blame. After all, other mystery heroines have been from wealthy backgrounds where they expected to have their way, but they have come across much more maturely than Julia. Add to this the overly dramatic scenes that take place a couple of times between her and her husband of nine months, private detective Nicholas Brisbane. It’s a formula for romantic fiction but not more serious mystery fiction. There are moments when I laughed that I am sure are not what the author intended. There are also moments when I was just plain annoyed. How many times can an author use the same terms to describe a husband and wife’s bedroom activities? In this case, more than I cared to read.

Overall, the March family (Lady Julia’s kin) in this book is a far cry from the March family in an icon of American Literature: Little Women. The sense of family unity is missing. (That’s the English Lit Major in me talking.)

Another tiresome item is the continual portrayal of Americans as brash, uncouth, and overbearing, like her one American character. One cannot say here that the author is not American, so such a cliché and underserved portrayal is expected. Raybourn was born and raised in Texas and now lives in Virginia.

For a large part, the lush surroundings and the thrill of getting vicariously to experience life in a tea garden makes up for these minor shortcomings. The author’s skill at weaving a mystery also makes this worthwhile reading. I must confess that I did not guess the true villain before Raybourn had revealed it. There were some other surprises along the way and a few expected items (for the time period of this novel – 1889). Not to brag, but there were also a few times when the author tried to lead me astray and did not.

You’ll find yourself so caught up in the events that you’ll finish half the book before you know it and the other half not long afterwards. Don’t forget that fresh cuppa tea first, though!

Disclaimer: I received a copy from the marketing firm for this review.

Make sure to check out A.C.’s blog, Tea Time with A.C. Cargill!

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© Online Stores, LLC, and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, LLC., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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