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We’ve all heard of tea with milk and maybe even cream, but have you ever heard of tea with cheese? Yes, you read that correctly! Cheese tea is the latest trend among tea connoisseurs. Many are taking to social media to post their refreshing tea topped with creamy cheese. It sounds a bit odd, but fans say it is not once you try it.

Where did cheese tea come from?

Cheese tea was originally created in Taiwan several years ago and was a hit in Asian countries. In recent years, the trend has reached America and it’s taking the country by storm.

What is cheese tea?

Cheese tea is made with any type of tea and a cheese mixture that varies. Some cheese tea blends are made with cheese and a mixture of cream cheese, condensed milk, and heavy cream, although there are more variations of cheese tea cheese. The cheese is whipped into a frothy texture and then poured straight on top of the cup of iced tea. Cheese tea is said to taste more dessert-like than savory. It is best to drink cheese tea like you would a beer (since they look like pints of foamy Guinness). The result is a foamy cheese moustache!

How do I try cheese tea?

For those of you brave enough to want to try cheese tea, some bubble tea shops carry the drink. It is sold in tea shops in many major cities but if one near you does not carry it yet, fear not. Like bubble tea, cheese tea is likely to reach a tea spot near you. If you want to be even more brave, you can try to make it yourself, although there are not many recipes for this just yet. Once I figure out a way to make the frothy cheese, there will be a recipe!

If you have ever tried a cheese tea, tell us in the comments! Your blogger is very curious as to how it tastes!

 

-CD

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IMG_5620

(c) Julia Briggs – English Tea Store

Now we all know how to make pastry (or buy it) so I will just tell you what you need:

6 oz short crust pastry for this recipe, sweet or not depending on your taste.

 

 

 

IMG_5619

(c) Julia Briggs – English Tea Store

Filling:

  • 8 oz Cottage or Curd Cheese – whichever you can buy
  • 2 oz  Sugar
  • 2oz  Currants
  • 1 Egg
  • 2oz  Melted Butter
  • Pinch of Cinnamon
  • Pinch of Nutmeg (if liked) I used ginger and nutmeg

Oven 220 C 425 F  or gas mark 7

This recipe makes 18 small tarts so an 18-hole tartlet tin greased.

IMG_5621

(c) Julia Briggs – English Tea Store

Make your pastry and roll out quite thinly then cut into rounds to fit your patty tin.  Place into the tins.  Mix together all the ingredients until well combined and fill your pastry lined tins.

Bake for approx 15 minutes until the pastry is cooked and the filling is bubbling slightly.

You can serve these hot or cold either way they are delicious with tea.

-JAB

Cheese Pastries

(c) Julia Briggs for The English Tea Store, all rights reserved.

I do not eat onions, they are bad for my digestion, so I like to make pastry squares with cheese in them, but if you like you can make them with cheese and onions.  You can make them large or small, but if you make them small they are very tasty warm from the oven with a nice cup of tea.

You will need:

  • A packet of ready rolled flaky pastry and some nice strong tasting cheddar cheese.
  • Just cut the pastry into squares and fill half of each square with slices of cheese, how mu
    Cheese Pastries 2

    (c) Julia Briggs for The English Tea Store, all rights reserved.

    ch cheese is personal taste.

  • Brush the pastry edges with water and fold over each pastry square and  crimp the edges with a fork.
  • Brush with egg wash or milk and bake for 15 – 20 minutes in a hot oven, 220 C, gas mark 8, 425 F, cool on a wire rack.

Of course you can make your own pastry and you can also make a cheese and onion thick sauce for the filling, however you make them I am sure you will enjoy them.

IMG_4444

(c) Julia Briggs for The English Tea Store, all rights reserved.

Sometimes one does not want something sweet with a cup of tea but something savoury but the question is what? I came up with a little ‘biscuit’ type thing after seeing a recipe for a cocktail nibble which was not quite what I was looking for. Now I know some of you are very fond of chocolate and all things nice but there may be some people out there who are looking for a nice savoury snack to have with a cuppa so here goes, my tomato and cheese whirls.

Oven 200 C 400 F or gas mark 6

8 oz rough puff pastry
approx 10 cherry tomatoes or 4 thinly sliced bigger tomatoes
approx 4 oz Cheddar cheese sliced.
a beaten egg.

Either make a quantity of rough puff pastry or use some frozen but thawed puff pastry. (We used rough puff pastry for the mince pies if you remember) If you are making your own then sift 8 oz plain flour with a pinch of salt into a bowl and add 5 oz butter cut into very small pieces and stir and chop. Mix to a stiff dough with approx 4 fluid oz of very cold water and turn out onto a floured worktop. Roll into a rectangle then fold down the top and fold up the bottom, turn a quarter turn and roll out again. Do this three more times then leave to rest for 15 mins.

Roll out your pastry quite thinly into an oblong about 18 inches by 14 inches. With the short sides to top and bottom,  spread the pastry with softened butter. Put slices of fresh tomatoes or halves of cherry tomatoes on top of the butter, I used ten cherry tomatoes cut in half. Thinly slice some strong Cheddar cheese and lay on top of the tomatoes.  Leave a one inch gap in the middle of your pastry and brush this with beaten egg, then roll down from the top to the gap and up from the bottom to the gap until they almost meet. Wrap in cling film and pop into the freezer for about half an hour. After 30 mins remove from freezer and place the roll onto a floured worktop. Cut through the centre strip to separate and slice the roll into approx half an inch slices and put onto a lined baking sheet and brush with beaten egg. Cook for about 10-15 mins until golden brown. Sprinkle with more grated cheese when they are cooked and leave to cool. They are good served immediately warm from the oven or cold the next day. If you want you can freeze one half and cook it another day.  Depending on the thickness you can make about 20 – 30 whirls with these quantities.

This is a very versatile recipe and you can use lots of different things if you want to; for instance, parsley or other herbs, black pepper or bacon cut into very small pieces. You can also drizzle olive oil on top before baking instead of the beaten egg. It is a good recipe to experiment with!  Enjoy!

Ch StrawsCheese straws are a very popular party food here in the UK. or these used to be in the 1970’s anyway!!  They are though, making a bit of a come-back with all the baking shows we now have on TV and they do go very well with Tea.  So if you want to try something savoury with your tea then try these.  They can be made into ‘sticks’ or rounds. you can even sandwich two together with cheese or put grated cheese on top for extra flavour.  If you want them to look nice you can make one straw into a round and put some other straws inside as I did.  The basic recipe is for cheese pastry so if you did not want to make cheese straws you can use this recipe for making a pastry flan case and then make a quiche.  Recipe for that at a later date!

100g or 4 ozs plain flour with a teaspoon of baking powder
50g or 2 ozs butter
75g or 3 ozs mature grated cheese
a pinch of salt and/or mustard powder
1 beaten egg

Cheese StrawsHeat the oven to 180 C, 350 F or gas mark 4 and prepare a baking sheet with baking parchment

Mix together the dry ingredients and rub in the butter to resemble fine crumbs. ( It is always good to have cold hands when making pastry!)  Stir in the cheese and add sufficient egg to make a stiff dough, not too wet and not too dry, if the dough comes away from the bowl leaving it clean then that is about right.  Roll out the pastry quite thinly and cut some into strips and some into rounds, make some strips into rounds for serving.  Put one circle on the baking sheet  add some sliced cheese and dampen the edges with the remaining egg or water, then cover with another circle and crimp together.  Brush everything with egg wash (egg and water) or milk and sprinkle more grated cheese on top if required.  Bake for 10-15 mins, leave to cool slightly on the baking sheet before transferring them to a cooling rack with a spatula.  Best served slightly warm on the day of baking or you can heat them in the microwave for a few seconds the next day.  Mine never last more than two days in the tin, in fact there are only three left now and I only made them this morning!

~JB

Cheese scones are delicious smothered with butter, cut into two with melted cheese on top or just on their own.  You can make plain scones without the cheese or sweet scones with sugar. Whichever you decide the results will be good I assure you.

175 g  or 6 ozs (3/4 c) Self Raising Flour
50 g  or 2 ozs (1/2 stick) Butter
75 g  or 3 ozs (1/3 c) grated strong cheese
a little milk and or a beaten egg

Heat the oven to 220 C, 425 F or Gas mark 7.  Prepare a baking sheet with some baking parchment.

Cheese SconeRub the butter into the flour until it resembles fine breadcrumbs, stir in the grated cheese, reserving a little for the top.  Make a well in the centre of the bowl and add a little milk or beaten egg until a soft dough is formed. (It is difficult to say exactly how much liquid you will need because flours do vary so I am afraid it is trial and error!) Sprinkle your unit top with flour and turn out the dough. Roll out with a rolling pin or just flatten slightly with your hand. Half an inch thick is good.  Using a scone cutter make about 6 or 8 scones and put onto the baking sheet. Brush the tops with milk or egg wash and sprinkle with the reserved cheese. Bake for about 10 to 15 mins until golden brown and firm sided.  Enjoy.

~JB

Still more tea and cheese pairings for a “cheesy” tea time (continued from Part II). In the final installment, we’re some general guidelines for pairing up teas and cheeses. (Again, this is a consolidation of the wealth of pairing suggestions available online.)

From someone obsessed by cheese

From someone obsessed by cheese

Some General Guidelines I’ve Seen:

Spring Pouchong

Spring Pouchong

  • Asiago cheeses pair with: Keemun (a Chinese black tea) and Pai Mu Tan (a nutty white tea also called White Peony or Baimudan).
  • Brie cheeses pair with: Long Ching (a fine Chinese green tea also called Longjing or Dragonwell), Ha Giang, Darjeeling, and Tung Ting Oolong.
  • Blue-Veined cheeses pair with: Teas that are sweet, nutty, and flavored with fruits, almonds, and spices such as ginger. These teas help balance the saltiness of cheeses such as Bleu and Gorgonzola, two well-loved examples that are known for their crumbly texture and distinct flavor.
  • Camembert cheeses pair with: Dragonwell/Long Ching/Lungjing, Chun Mee (a special Chinese green tea), Gunpowder, Ha Giang, First Flush Darjeeling, and Sikkim.
  • Cheddar cheeses pair with: Tung Ting Oolong and Darjeeling.

    Lychee Congou

    Lychee Congou

  • Cream cheese cheeses pair with: Ceylon, Darjeerling, and Cameroon.
  • Edam cheeses pair with: Ceylon, Autumnal Darjeeling, and Buddha’s Finger Oolong.
  • Gorgonzola cheeses pair with: Chun Mee, Ha Giang, Ceylon, and Pouchong.
  • Intense cheeses paired with: A smoky tea. For example, Gorgonzola with Lapsang Souchong.
  • Muenster cheeses pair with: Tung Ting Oolong and Pouchong
  • Nutty cheeses pair with: Nutty and more astringent black teas, plus earthy, bold teas. For example, Comte Cheese with Ceylon tea.
  • Provolone cheeses pair with: Ceylon and Nilgiri.
  • Salty cheeses pair with: Slightly sweeter, floral or fruity teas.
  • Soft/Fresh cheeses paired with: The earthy flavor of green tea.
  • Soft/mild creamy cheeses paired with:Astringent black teas.

    Bohemian Raspberry Green Tea

    Bohemian Raspberry Green Tea

  • Soft, creamy cheeses paired with: A mild green tea. For example, Chèvre with Sencha.
  • Try salty cheeses paired with: A sweet tea. For example, Stilton Blue Cheese with Lychee Congou.

There you have it. Lots of tea and cheese pairings to explore. Enjoy!

See also:
A Cheesy Tea Time

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

A little over a year ago I took a closer look at the issue of pairing tea and cheese. The topic was hot then and seems to be getting hotter every year. So, it’s time to take a look at more “cheesy” tea time pairings, for tea and cheese go together as naturally as cheese and wine.

Featured in a “name that cheese” contest back in November 2010!

Featured in a “name that cheese” contest back in November 2010!

One of the amazing things about cheese is that there are hundreds of different ones out there. Just as there are hundreds (and some say thousands) of different teas (we’re talking about true tea from Camellia Sinensis and without flavorings added). You probably know about some of the more readily available cheeses. These include: cheddar, Colby, cottage, brie, parmesan, Swiss, American, mozzarella, Monterey jack, ricotta, and Velveeta. You also probably know about the more common teas, such as: black tea blends (English Breakfast, Irish Breakfast, PG Tips, Barry’s, Typhoo, etc.), generic green teas, and flavored classics like Earl Grey, Jasmine, and teas with cinnamon and spices added (often just called “chai”). There are many others that are not as well-known but that go well with teas.

Here I’m going to take the same tack that I did on tea and chocolatepairings recently, that is, I’m going to consolidate a wealth of suggestions found online. Saves you some time and a sore mouse clicking finger.

There were so many that I split the list into three parts. Let’s start with white, green, and oolong teas, and cheeses to pair with them.

White Peony / Pai Mu Tan

White Peony / Pai Mu Tan

White Teas

  • White Peony (also known as Pai Mu Tan or Baimudan) with Buffalo Mozzarella — A mildly salty cheese and a tea with a delicate nectarine flavor combine to give you a subtle and smooth pairing.
  • White Peony with goat cheese blended with honey — The honey in the goat cheese brought out some really nice honeysuckle nectar-like notes in the White Peony.
  • White Peony with Chevre, Marieke Gouda, Hooks 3-Year Cheddar, Hooks Blue Cheese, Sarvecchio, Carr Valley Mobay — The tea complements the very distinct flavors of these cheeses.

Green Teas

Japanese Sencha

Japanese Sencha

  • Kukicha or Sencha with Asiago Pressata — A very mild cheese to go with green teas with a low amount of tannins.
  • Sencha with Manchego — A delicate green tea that mellows out the sharpness of this hard cheese.
  • Mao Feng Young Tips Green Tea and King Island Triple Cream Brie — This tea has a distinctly creamy aroma followed by a light grassy flavor. The cheese is soft white and creamy, making the pairing quite dramatic.
  • Lung Ching / Longjing / Dragonwell with aged raw milk Gruyère (two-year), Walnut Cheese, Emmenthal The nutty, sweet tea makes it a good match for Gruyère (fatty, salty), walnut cheese (nutty), and Emmenthal (nutty, salty).
  • Gyokuro with Lost Lake — This spinachy, kelpy, astringent, and vegetal tea cuts through the fat of this goat cheese (from Fifth Town Artisan Dairy, Ontario, Canada). [my review of Gyokuro]
  • Jasmine Green with Chevre, Marieke Gouda, Hooks 3-Year Cheddar, Hooks Blue Cheese, Sarvecchio, Carr Valley Mobay — Just like White Peony, this tea complements the very distinct flavors of these cheeses.

Oolong Teas

Tie Kuan Yin Iron Goddess Oolong

Tie Kuan Yin Iron Goddess Oolong

  • Tie Guan Yin with Dutch Goat Cheese or Monte Enebro (Spanish goat cheese) — The tea, a lightly oxidized oolong, has a floral/fruity aroma that sets off the tanginess of both cheeses and brings out the lemony quality of the Monte Enebro while softening its more musty aroma.
  • Milk Oolong with Manchego (Aged) — The tea’s smooth, slightly floral notes contrast with the cheese’s deep, rich pepper quality.
  • Big Red Robe (Da Hong Pao) with Australian Blackjack Vintage Cheddar — The tea, a highly oxidized Wuyi Rock oolong with a flavor that is earthy, rich, malty, and mildly charcoal, goes well with the full flavored vintage cheddar, producing a ‘coconut’ flavor that the tea does not have by itself.

Part II covers Darjeeling and black teas paired with various cheeses!

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Something is cheesy at tea time. More and more, people are pairing cheeses with their teas for a truly harmonious taste experience. Time to join in the fun!

Cheese and wine are a well-known combination. In some people’s minds, they are as natural together as apple pie and ice cream, hot dogs and baseball games, or even SUVs and Soccer Moms. Beer is getting more into the act, too, which isn’t surprising with all the microbreweries around. (When I lived in Germany, just about every town there seemed to have one.) Lately, though, cheese is becoming a bigger part of tea time!

Arya Estate Darjeeling 2009 Autumn Flush with sharp cheddar – superb!

Arya Estate Darjeeling 2009 Autumn Flush with sharp cheddar – superb!

Yes, cheese and tea pairings are becoming the rage, with parties devoted to this fine art of selection seeming to be more and more common. Some pros in this area are so adept at successful pairings, they could put the folks at eHarmony.com to shame! (Sorry, cheesy humor there.)

One of these pros is Steven Smith, founder of two well-known tea brands (Stash and Tazo). He is now proprietor of a specialty tea shop in Portland, Oregon, where he blends teas and serves them in his tea room along with cheeses from Rogue Creamery. He pairs creamy, rich, sharp cheeses with Yunnan and blue cheeses with Mao Feng Shui, plus many more.

You don’t have to travel to Portland, though, to put your own pairings together. There are some basics to keep in mind, and you can do your own experiments.

One of the big factors to consider is cheese firmness (texture). If you prefer spreadable, runny, or soft cheeses, your tea choices are different than with firm-to-hard cheeses. Soft cheeses like Brie and Camembert both go well with Dragonwell, and crumbly yet strong tasting goat cheese goes with Assam.

If your taste goes more to those firm-to-hard cheeses such as cheddar or Edam, then some good tea options are Autumn Darjeeling, Tung Ting Oolong, Keemun, Chun Mee, a black Ceylon, and Pai Mu Tan (White Peony). However, Sencha can mellow out a sharp hunk of Manchego.

Flavor strength is another consideration. Limburger is truly odiferous, so you need a stronger flavored tea to go with it such as the rich smokiness of Lapsang Souchong. Milder cheeses like Asiago need a more delicate tea taste like you get in Kukicha or Sencha.

These are just a few tips to get you started adding a bit of cheese to your tea time. Do your own pairings, lining up your teas, labeled with their names, along one side of the table and your cheeses along the other side, little labels proudly declaring “Stilton,” “Feta,” “Havarti,” “Parmesan,” etc. It’ll look sort of like those high school dances where the guys are on one side of the room and the girls on the other. Be sure the cheeses are room temperature so their true flavors will come out. The teas should be served at the temperature that is suitable for them. For example, Assams are great piping hot while Oolongs and greens can be more flavorful when they have cooled slightly in the cup.

Feel free to leave a comment here to let me know how it went. You’ll be doing your part for tea and cheese lovers everywhere. Thanks!

Don’t miss A.C.’s blog, Tea Time with A.C. Cargill!

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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© Online Stores, LLC, and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, LLC., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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