If you are looking to switch to tea from those other liquid substances (coffee, colas, etc.) but aren’t sure how to start or if you are just looking to expand your tea horizons, we have some ways for you to make some wise choices. It’s the Tea Decision Tree. Here’s how it works…

How do you choose the right cuppa! (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

How do you choose the right cuppa! (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Step 1 – Why Are You Drinking Tea?

Choosing between teas can often begin with why you are drinking tea. Decide which it is. Often it’s a mix of these.

  • Flavor – A very important part of anything we eat and drink.
  • Mood – Tea is the great uplifter yet soother.
  • Some hoped-for health benefit – Lots of claims out there, some are even supported by scientific evidence.

Step 2 – Choosing the Next Criteria

  • Flavors – bold, fruit, citrus, jasmine, mild, oaky, spicy, etc.
  • Mood – refreshing, soothing, something new
  • Health Benefit – digestion, energy boost, relaxing for sleep

Step 3 – Select One of the Options Presented

Depending on the previous choices you will have various options.

  • A bold and energizing option – English Breakfast blends of black teas balanced to stimulate you and your tastebuds.
  • A citrus option – Lemon-flavored teas often come to mind here, but try some Blood Orange Flavored Black Tea for a change of pace. It has an intense and flavorful fresh citrus character with a delicate sweetness reminiscent of freshly squeezed oranges.
  • For more mild and relaxing – Earl Grey, a blend of teas from India and Sri Lanka with flavoring from oil of bergamot (a small acidic orange).
  • Digestion – Pu-erhs have a reputation for aiding here, so you could give them a try. If you’re new to this style of tea, be prepared for something really different: an aroma and taste that some compare to soil or leaves decomposing on a forest floor. Scottish Caramel Toffee Pu-erh Tea is a great alternative with that toffee adding a sweet touch.
  • Relax and sleep – Chamomile herbal infusion.

Going for It!

Okay, you’ve got your options. Just make your choice, steep it up, and let that tea magic work on you.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

It has become customary to include a novelty tea infuser in each one of these reports whenever possible. So, with no further ado, here’s the latest and greatest. It seems rather appropriate for an object that’s dunked in water and is called a Deep Tea Diver Infuser.

I wrote about tea smuggling at this site not so long ago. It was once a significant problem, particularly in England during the times when exorbitant taxes on tea encouraged this sort of thing. I assumed that it’s not such a common problem today but according to a recent report in the Pakistani press “100 tons of smuggled black tea has been seized by the Customs Intelligence and Investigation” there.

What would five million teabags look like? Probably like a whole lot of tea but, to see it for yourself, you would have had to attend the grand publicity caravan held for the Tour de France recently. Where the well-known English tea firm Taylors of Harrogate gave out that many teabags, along with a mere 60,000 packets of sweetener to help “sweeten the deal.” That’s more than 200 miles of teabags if you laid them end to end. Not that you ever would.

Just exactly what does an exotic tea hunter do? It all sounds very Indiana Jones but, if you’d like to know the details, you can check out a recent Forbes article titled “The Adventures Of Exotic Tea Hunter Rodrick Markus.”

Is tea important to the British? Well, what do you think? From the Department of Research into the Blatantly Obvious comes the revelation that tea is indeed important to the British and is ranked as one of the three top-ranked staples of modern life, along with TV and T-shirts. Results varied depending on the age group of those surveyed and the survey itself was conducted by none other than the online auction giant eBay.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Many of you know that China is the home of tea. In fact, at one point in time virtually all tea drunk world-wide came from China. Eventually, growing tea expanded to northern India and is now is a wide variety of countries. But as the home of tea, China deserves a bit of special acknowledgement, especially their legends related to tea. We’ll start with one of the best known: Guanyin, also called The Goddess of Mercy (Compassion). (The legend of Shen Nong has been covered quite a bit in this blog already, so we shall omit it here and go to some you might not know about.)

Guanyin Iron Goddess of Mercy (Bodhisattva version) (Stock image)

Guanyin Iron Goddess of Mercy (Bodhisattva version) (Stock image)

Guanyin (Kwan Yin, Kuan Yin)

The goddess Guanyin, also known in English as the Mercy Goddess or Goddess of Mercy, is a bodhisattva. That means she has attained enlightenment yet chose not to enter nirvana until all beings on Earth have also attained enlightenment. She is also revered by Chinese Taoists as an immortal. In Chinese art, Guanyin is often depicted either alone, standing atop a dragon, accompanied by a white parrot, flanked by two children, or flanked by two warriors. Some Buddhists believe that when one of their adherents departs from this world, they are placed by Guanyin in the heart of a lotus, and then sent to the western pure land of Sukhāvatī. So she is sometimes shown standing on a lotus blossom (the traditional symbol of Buddha).

A goddess tea: Ti Kuan Yin Iron Goddess Oolong Tea – A distinctive light cup with hints of orchid in the flavor. Premium grade, at first bitter, then sweet, and finishes with a fragrance that lingers on your palate.

Dragons

Dragons show up a lot in Chinese legends and symbols. They are supposed to be able to transform themselves and so represent adaptability. But they also represent power, good luck, the natural world, and rule of the seas and skies. If they have 5 toes/claws, they become the emperor’s sacred symbol of imperial power and dignity and are one of the 12 Symbols of Sovereignty. The dragon is also one of the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac. In ancient China, dragons were thought live in the mountains or in the seas and to speed across the sky with divine power. They can generally symbolize benevolence, prosperity, longevity, and the renewal of life.

A dragon tea: Nine Bend Black Dragon Tea – Full-bodied with burgundy depth and delightful oaky notes. One of the finest examples of a Chinese black tea available on the market and considered to be one of the luckiest teas in all of Asia.

Monkeys Picking Tea

Monkey-picked tea is one of those tales told to gullible outsiders. Or is it? Some swear that it’s true. The monkey is certainly an important part of Chinese legends and symbols and is one of the 12 animals of the Chinese Zodiac. It is also supposed to drive away evil spirits and can bring good fortune in officialdom. The picture of a monkey on a horse is a visual pun for the wish for an immediate promotion in official rank. The Monkey King was a fictional character in a Ming Dynasty novel (“Journey to the West”). The legend was part of the movie The Forbidden Kingdom, featuring martial arts movie legends Jackie Chan and Jet Li.

Jet Li as the Monkey King (via Yahoo! Images)

Jet Li as the Monkey King (via Yahoo! Images)

A monkey tea: White Monkey Paw Green Tea – Very delicate with an intense full green tea flavor. Made from the top two leaves and the bud of new season growth (late March /early April) that are gently and gingerly steamed and dried for an exquisite hand-made green tea. The dry leaf appearance of these teas is said to resemble a monkey paw.

The Oxherd and the Weaver Girl

The cowherd, Niulang was forced to leave home with only an old cow/ox (a former god sent to earth as punishment) for company. He met Zhinu, a beautiful fairy, while she was taking a bath on earth. They fell in love, married, had a son and daughter, and led a happy life. However, Zhinu was eventually taken back to heaven. The cow/ox said to make shoes from his hide and that these would take Niulang and his children to heaven. Zhinu’s mother was enraged and created the Milky Way to keep them apart, but magpies formed a bridge across it. After that, they were allowed to meet once a year on the 7th night of the 7th month (per the Chinese lunar calendar).

A love tea: Allegra Jasmine Burst Flowering Green Tea – Created as a tribute to the great cultural awakening of the Song Dynasty in China. A man, perhaps while sitting under a sweetly smelling jasmine tree, came up with the idea of scenting tea with the blossoms. This version delivers an intensely delicate infusion that fills the mouth with a bright jasmine character, and pale, grassy notes with a hint of sweet light honey. A wonderful sipping tea.

Wealth pots

These are symbols of good luck and wealth. Fill them with money and place them in the inner wealth corner of your house – southeast. Personally, we think that a pot full of tasty tea set on any corner of the table (or better yet in the middle to avoid any chance of it getting bumped off by elbows, etc.) is wealth indeed.

A wealth tea: Peony White Needle White Tea – A delicate lingering fragrance and a fresh mellow sweet taste with no astringency or grassy flavor. A clean taste faintly reminiscent of fresh apples with a refreshing and lingering flavor.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Our tea cooking adventure has gone decidedly French. With such hot afternoons, indulging in a well-made breakfast while basking in the sun sipping tea seems to be the perfect way to spend a morning.

Tea French Toast (photo by Janet Sanchez, all rights reserved)

Tea French Toast (photo by Janet Sanchez, all rights reserved)

½ cup milk heated to 212°F
1 tsp Puerh tea
4 eggs
½ tsp pure vanilla extract
1 tsp cinnamon
½ tsp fresh ground nutmeg
1 tbsp melted butter (plus a few tbsp for cooking)
8 thick cut slices of bread

Steep the tea in the heated milk for 5 minutes. In a separate flat bottomed vessel whisk the eggs until scrambled. Add in cinnamon, vanilla and nutmeg. Once the butter and milk have cooled slightly whisk in slowly to the seasoned eggs. Ensure all ingredients are thoroughly combined.

The bread chosen can be practically anything to please personal taste. In this case a store bought cinnamon loaf was used. Some suggested breads are Texas toast, cinnamon rolls cut in half, brioche, and apple bread. The single most important thing when making quality French toast is to use thick-cut bread. Approximately one inch thick is desirable. In addition, this is a recipe where the use of day-old bread is wonderful. The bread needs to have enough mass to absorb the egg mixture without becoming too soggy. Thicker bread will allow both the absorption of the egg mixture as well as still giving a crisper texture on the outside.

In a large skillet over medium heat melt enough butter to coat the bottom of the pan. Take a slice of toast and soak each side for a few seconds into the egg mixture. Place directly into the heated skillet. Do this for as many slices as the pan will hold. Cook about 2-3 minutes per side or until golden brown and a nice crust has formed. Serve this with syrup, fresh fruit, powdered sugar or anything the imagination wishes.

See more of Janet Sanchez’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

That is NOT a typo. We are not discussing how to make tea float (as in those little leaves or bits of leaf dust on the surface of the water). We’re also not talking about parades here. But we are discussing a rather unique dessert idea that is not a latté, not a smoothie, and not even iced tea. It is a tea float. You know, like a root beer float but with tea.

I usually leave the recipes to more able writers on this blog, but ice cream and me have been friends for decades now. Not just friends – more like bosom buddies, as in if ice cream is within arms’ length of me, it doesn’t have to worry about melting. It won’t last long enough for that. Time to introduce this good friend to another good friend: tea. You might say this is a twist on Thai Milk Tea or even Pearl Tea (also called Bubble Tea). Start with one that can go well with milk so it doesn’t clash with the ice cream and optional whipped cream (hey, there’s no sense in skimping here – if you’re gonna have one of these, you might as well accept that the calorie count will be a bit hefty, not to mention the fat content). If you’re a maraschino cherries lover (also optional), be sure the tea you select will go with them. So a fruit flavored one would very likely be out of the question. One thing to note: since you’re not using a carbonated beverage as the base, you won’t get some of that foaming action when you combine the ingredients.

1. Thai Milk Tea Float. 2. Green tea float. (From Yahoo! Images)

1. Thai Milk Tea Float. 2. Green tea float. (From Yahoo! Images)

My recipe:

  • Any black tea blend (my fave is English Breakfast Blend No. 1 Tea with Scottish Breakfast Tea being a close second) – steeped up double strength.
  • Put two scoops of vanilla ice cream in a 12-ounce glass.
  • Pour the tea over it (you can let the tea cool to room temperature or chill overnight in the refrigerator).
  • Top with whipped cream and a maraschino cherry.
  • Enjoy! (the most important ingredient)

I am not the first one to have thought of this idea, though. There appear to be others thinking along the same lines, especially during these Dog Days of Summer.

Other recipes found online:

  • Turkey Hill Float Tea – A single scoop of ice cream in a separate compartment above the one that holds the tea. When the customer is ready to enjoy, he/she pulls a tab on the side of container, which allows the ice cream to drop down into the iced tea.
  • Cold Brew Tea-Time Ice Cream Float – In 2-quart pitcher, pour water over tea bags; brew 5 minutes, dunking tea bags occasionally. Remove tea bags. Stir in brown sugar until blended. Pour tea into four glasses and top with vanilla ice cream. Garnish, if desired, with whipped cream and serve immediately.
  • Green Tea Ice Cream Float – A Summer delight from Japan. Soft green tea ice cream in a cup of chilled green tea. The perfect summer coolant.
  • Creamy Ice Tea Floats – This recipe uses Thai iced tea as the drink’s base, instead of a carbonated pop drink.
  • Ice Cream Tea Float – Step by step photos to create the perfect cooling treat.

Lots more options are available. Choose your style and enjoy. It’ll be Fall before you know it with cooler temps ahead.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

ETS Drawstring Tea Filters (ETS Image)

ETS Drawstring Tea Filters (ETS Image)

The teabag has been around for a while. Over a century now, though the exact figure varies, depending on which accounts you believe. In any event, teabags aren’t going away anytime soon and, as you might have guessed, have inspired a number of creative inventors to try out some offbeat variations on the theme. I covered a few of these here and now it’s time to look at a few more.

First up, the Two Part Tea Bag, which was patented about a decade ago. Though it’s hard to believe that no one thought of this before. Unlike many offbeat inventions this one is actually rather clever and may even be potentially useful. As the name suggests, the gadget consists of two bags, one of which consists of tea and the other a “flavoring material.” As the description notes, they “are detachably connected together so that they can be selectively steeped together or separately.”

There are many ways to deal with the problem of the squishy, messy, used teabag when you’re finished with it, and I’ve seen a number of them that resemble the Combination Mug With Integral Tea Bag Receptacle. But given that it was patented in 1989, it’s likely that it was one of the earlier efforts along these lines. As the patent says, “A transverse receptacle is formed into the upper portion of a mug, which slot opens up into the mug. A tea bag which has been dipped into hot water may be slid by the string attached to the tea bag from the hot water into the transverse receptacle where it can rest until it needs to be subsequently reused or eventually discarded.”

Patents aren’t always written in the most user friendly language – or maybe it’s just me. It probably doesn’t help when the text is translated from another language, as is the case with this one for a Tea-Bag String Having Functions of Indicating Soaking Condition. As nearly as I can tell the teabag string changes color for some reason or another depending on that is going on with the tea. Which might be a useful invention that we need but, without fully understanding it, I couldn’t swear to it.

Finally, from 1992, the Holder for Multiple String Suspended Tea Bags seems to be a device that allows one to steep a number of teabags at one time. Again, the text of the patent is a little bit tricky, and I can’t imagine how or why you’d use such a gadget, but apparently someone thought there would be a use for it.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

A mug is a mug is a mug…or is it? A stylish tea mug will usually have certain elements in its design. Here are a few to look for when selecting the perfect mugs for your special tea parties or even those solo tea moments.

(ETS images)

(ETS images)

Some examples:

  1. Beau Rose Bone China Can Mug – White bone china helps the beautiful Beau Rose pattern in soft pink and green really stand out. Note the little butterfly inside and the classic shape of the handle. Dishwasher safe. Holds about 10 ounces.
  2. Blue Butterfly Porcelain Mug with Strainer – Ideal for that solo tea moment – just you and a hot mug of tasty tea. This one is a charming addition to your tea time – with gold trim, a swirl border, and a lovely butterfly pattern on white porcelain. A key element here is the saucer that you can use to hold the white porcelain strainer. Dishwasher safe.
  3. Royal Albert Old Country Roses Mug – A classic pattern from the Royal Albert collection in a classic shape (a great element to keep in mind when shopping). The crisp, white, fine bone china and is decorated with the Old Country Roses’ signature motif of burgundy, pink and yellow roses, accented with lustrous gold banding. Note the easy-to-hold handle shape and slight pedestal at the bottom. Holds 9.6 ounces.
  4. Petite Fleur Mug – White porcelain, purple irises and butterflies, a pedestal base, and a unique handle design make this mug stylish indeed. Holds 14 ounces. Hand wash only.
  5. Summertime Rose Fine Bone China Mug – A classic body shape decorated in the beautiful Summertime Rose pattern. Brilliant white fine bone china makes the design of pink and red roses really pop. The classic handle has a small thumb notch at the apex for more steady holding. Dishwasher and microwave safe. Holds 7 ounces.

Body shape, handle design, and pattern on the exterior all combine to make your mug totally stylish. Fill it with your favorite tea and have a wonderful time.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

It seems sometimes that a lot of the discussions about iced tea revolve around the various methods for preparing it. There are several that are most commonly used. You can steep the tea in hot water like most people do for hot tea and then chill it by pouring it over ice or simply by chilling it. You can cold brew it by pouring water over the tea and chilling it for a specified period of time while it steeps. Or you can try the popular but somewhat controversial method of harnessing sunlight to prepare sun tea, which is kind of a combination of the aforementioned.

Something that seems to not come up as often when it comes to iced tea is the quality of the tea itself. All tea – be it iced or hot – has something in common: it is not created equal. I’ve never run across any research on the matter but, based on my own unscientific and statistically insignificant observations, it seems that a lot of people will use just about any tea to prepare iced tea and in many cases the cheaper the better.

But you get what you pay for with tea, as with so many other things, and the advice that I’ve given many times over is to buy the best tea that you can possibly afford. Perhaps the nuances of a really good tea might not be quite so apparent if you prefer sweet tea or something like it. Which is to say iced black tea with a whole lot of sugar tossed in for good measure.

If you’ve never considered the possibility of iced tea without sugar, maybe that has a lot to do with using sugar to cover up the taste of tea that’s not necessarily so tasty on its own. Or maybe you simply like your tea sweetened. It seems to be the standard for iced tea, and in the American South most people apparently don’t know of any other way to serve it.

My advice for iced tea, as I’ve sort of suggested already, is to try forgoing the sugar for a change, as well as those tea bags that contain less than stellar tea. Then, try preparing tea from leaves that are a cut above the rest. Who knows? You might actually find yourself rethinking your ideas about sweetened tea.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

(From Yahoo! Images)

(From Yahoo! Images)

Tea time can get reflective, with memories of days gone by flooding into your consciousness. Thus it was the other day that, while sipping my mid-afternoon cuppa Darjeeling (or was it an oolong?), that the memory of the oscillating fan came to the forefront and imposed itself over all the other things circling around in my brain (from grocery lists to my plans for upcoming tea tastings). Oscillating fans are still quite popular, but there was a time when their importance during those sultry days of Summer was beyond price. Let me explain…

I remember the days of my youth before we had air conditioning. The oscillating fan blew on me – ah! Turned away – agony! It was set in a wide-open window in the bedroom in a vain attempt to give some relief so I could sleep. Heat is bad enough, but coupled with high humidity makes it like lying in a pool of hot water. Even those who are raised in Equatorial or Monsoonal regions never really acclimate. The worst is when the temperature in the evening after the sun goes down stays up relatively high. A drop from 99° to 85° Fahrenheit hardly matters when humidity is 70-80-90%. And neither do oscillating fans. But every time it turned my way I gave a sigh of momentary relief.

I wanted to stop the oscillation and have the fan blowing on me all the time, but it was supposed to be better for air movement with the breeze going around the room. Maybe so, but one thing was for sure … it was even better with a glass full of ice and tea in hand. In the daytime, I would either be outside under a shady tree with that cold tea or inside in front of that oscillating fan. Fortunately, there was only a limited portion of the year when such weather was in force. But I don’t know how I would have survived with the fan and the tea.

These days I drink hot tea year round (and others do the opposite – drinking iced tea year round). And we have air conditioning. But the memories linger. It makes my gratitude for technology all the greater.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

 © Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Nothing seems to drum up headlines like ridiculously expensive tea. Okay, there are plenty of other things that drum up headlines, like problems in the Middle East and celebrities behaving badly. But pricey tea is still good for a headline or two.

Like one from a British newspaper not so long ago. And I quote: Would you pay £180 for a pot of TEA? World’s most expensive brew goes on sale. I’d be more excited about all of this but, as the title of my own article suggests, this sort of thing is hardly unusual. I’ve written on this topic before – here’s a recent example – but I’m always open to taking another look.

The pot of tea in question will set you back the equivalent of just over $300 and can be had at the “prestigious Royal China Club on London’s affluent Baker Street.” The tea in this case is said to be a “Da Honh Pao (Imperial Red Robe)” whose leaves have supposedly been aged for 80 years. The result, “an aromatic infusion with distinctive dark cocoa notes, a toasted fruity flavour and a long smooth aftertaste that lingers for several minutes after consumed.” Which sounds enticing enough.

So, let’s allow that a teapot contains four cups, on average. If you wanted to go in with four of your pals and spring for a pot of this elixir you could each get a cup of it for about 75 dollars. Which is nothing to sneeze at and, while I’m certainly an avid cheerleader for drinking the best tea that you can, I can’t help but wonder if there’s any tea in existence that’s worth that much. But I’ll extend the same offer I have before when writing about such pricey tea. If anyone would like to pass along a sample, I’ll be glad to give it a try.

If you’re not up for paying 75 big ones for a cup of tea, take heart. If you’re ever at the Royal China Club and you’re a little bit short you can get a much more reasonable serving of tea for two for a mere eight dollars.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Categories

Explore our content:

Find us on these sites:


Follow Us!     Like Us!     Follow Us!     Follow Us!     Plus 1 Us!
Follow Tea Blog on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Tweet This!    add to del.icio.us    add to furl    digg this    stumble it!    add to simpy    seed the vine    add to reddit     post to facebook    technorati faves

Copyright Notice:

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Blog Affiliates

blogged
Bloglisting.net - The internets fastest growing blog directory

Networked Blogs

%d bloggers like this: